Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

Arina Ailincai - Romanian ceramic artist, October 2012

ROMANIAN CONTEMPORARY CERAMICS, October 2012: Arina Ailincăi

Arina Ailincai - Romanian ceramic artist, Romanian contemporary ceramics special feature

Interview by Vasi Hîrdo for Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two
Translation by Anca Sânpetrean

What was your first contact with ceramics?

The first meeting with ceramic took place when I entered the university, as I decided to take the admission exam for the Ceramics Department. The reason for this option was the liberal reputation held by the Ceramics Department, mainly due to the young teachers of various formations, who were encouraging the free investigation subordinated to an “interdisciplinary” that at that time was quite attractive.

Because originally I had a sentimental inclination for Graphics - I was more familiar with expressing myself through lines and white / black tonal values. My way of perceiving the world and building volumes remained indebted to the graphic vision.

After graduation, due to my job as a designer at the porcelain factory in Cluj, I familiarized myself with the subtle expressivity of porcelain and its processing technology, practicing with this material for a long time, and ending up loving it.

You have participated in many competitions and international group exhibitions. What are the most important things you have learned by taking part in these events?

For me they represent a form of self-assessment and validation of my personal approach to ceramics in a context of ongoing dialogue with other colleagues. As for the residences and symposiums, they are extremely benefic cultural exchanges for the refreshening of one’s ideas. They also bring the sense of being an ambassador of one’s own culture and historical traditions who makes a personal contribution, no matter how small, to the international artistic context. These kinds of events are especially significant for Romanian artists who have suffered, as we all know, from a period of political restrictions that had made the direct contact with the cultural world outside the Communist Bloc almost impossible.

What message or feeling do you want to convey to your viewer through your works? The portraits and the imprints that constitute your work are part of the artistic approach, or they are simply the result of a process of searching?

I find it hard to give a clear answer to this question, because it implies a number factors of which an artist is not always aware. Maybe is best to say that my works are the imprint of my inner trials and tribulations. In other words, they are a way of sensitively relating to the socio-cultural climate that surrounds me.

How the viewer can “read” my work, depends on one’s cultural heritage or current state of mind, and on other many things… but the perception with its various interpretations will always remains an open question. But oh, what joy we experience when the viewer interpretation comes close to the intended meaning, proving that our discourse is not just a monolog lost in void. 

[] Read the full interview in Ceramics Now - Issue Two

Arina Ailincai Contemporary art

Besides figurative ceramic sculptures, you also create ceramic objects, installations and graphic drawings. What is the relationship between these works and the notion of experiment?

The world of the artist is an ongoing experiment, such as our entire existence. Early in my career, the decorative/ functional ceramic objects and the graphic drawings developed separately. Over time I have “married” them in installations - in which each one had a distinct contribution - or conjugated in one work, the inserted graphics having a textural and semantic role in the body of the sculpture.

In fact, I could say that drawing and photography have helped me to get beyond the decorative functional ceramic, to the exercise of figurative sculpture and helped me make the transition from object to installations. Still, in my figurative sculptures, the graphic signs and the writing have a great weight. In conclusion, I could say that using a wide range of materials and techniques, and crossing boundaries between artistic disciplines is beneficial to the development of the artistic language which puts the idea more easily in circulation.

Are you currently working on a project? Where we can see your works in the future?

The projects create one another and come back to you in time with a cyclic recurrence. Lately, I’ve been working with representations of fragments of the human body. Fragments are a concentration of the vital expression, each one symbolizing the whole (synecdoche); they are an independent sculptural entity, which contains a formal expression and symbolic weight.
My current favorite theme, “Janus” – the Greek myth of the two heads, is important for me because of its ambivalent connotations that can be found in different cultural backgrounds.

Arina Ailincai - Romanian contemporary ceramics special feature

The full interview will be published in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two.

The Romanian contemporary ceramics special feature is a written review of Romanian contemporary ceramics through interviews with internationally-renowned and emerging Romanian artists.

Visit Arina Ailincăi’s website.

→ View our featured ceramic artists list (posts).
Subscribe to our free monthly newsletter | Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Subscribe to Ceramics Now or buy single issues from our dedicated shop.

© The interview is subject to copyright and belongs to Ceramics Now and Arina Ailincăi. Cannot be used without credit and original link.


  • 8 Oct 2012
  • 4 Notes
  • -
  • Interviews
  • Romanian contemporary ceramics
  • Romanian ceramics
  • art
  • ceramics
  • contemporary ceramics
  • Romanian artist
  • October 2012
  • ceramics now
  • ceramics now magazine
  • ceramic sculpture
  • sculptural ceramics
  • Vasi Hirdo
  • 4 notes | Show
    1. fearthisgenderqueer reblogged this from ceramicsnow
    2. sailpompeii reblogged this from ceramicsnow
    3. ceramicsnow posted this
    All work is copyright of respective owner, otherwise © 2014 Ceramics Now. Website design by Thomas Cullen. Powered by Tumblr.