Mark Goudy: Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m70) 7”w x 3”h; (m81) 10.5”w x 4”h; (m71) 8”w x 3.5”h

Mark Goudy: Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m70) 7”w x 3”h; (m81) 10.5”w x 4”h; (m71) 8”w x 3.5”h

Mark Goudy: Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m49) 10”w x 5”h; (m50) 10”w x 4.5”h; (m53) 10”w x 4.5”h

Mark Goudy: Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m49) 10”w x 5”h; (m50) 10”w x 4.5”h; (m53) 10”w x 4.5”h

September Newsletter, Ceramics Now Magazine

September Newsletter, Ceramics Now Magazine

Our newsletter is coming later this month with amazing interviews. Claire Muckian is our Artist of the Month and talks about her career as a young ceramic artist, Simcha Even-Chen is our Recognized Artist and Shamai Gibsh talks about Ceramic Technique. Plus the New Artist we are proposing every month (name to be revealed soon).

Subscribe here to be the first to receive the interviews.

+++ A special feature on Japanese artists, with many interviews and images is coming in early October!

+++ Soon you will be able to pre-order the first printed issue of Ceramics Now Magazine (November)!

Simcha Even-Chen

Simcha Even-Chen's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

In my recent works I use ceramic sculptures to investigate the elements of ambiguity and dynamic of opposites.  Ambiguity is express by the contrast between appearance and reality. Looking at the precise shapes that enclose and contain space gives the impression of solid and massive bodies when they are in fact, surprisingly light and delicate.
The dynamic of opposite is express in a way that juxtaposes the precise and controlled building and graphic design of the ceramic work the unpredictable firing technique of “Naked Raku”.
In these works I’m dealing with issues such as tensions between polarities, with fragmentation and constructions and with illusions. These concepts are guidelines for my treatment of space in the context of surface-volume relationships. The division of the body surface between white and black, as well as the use of lines softens the shape, simultaneously placing the grid or lines on the edge of the shape, so that they follow the shape, completely dissolve the hard lines. Viewing from different angles, surface and volume are blurred, giving an illusion of flatness.
This idea is strengthened and extended by working with pairs or creating a composition of a few units, where new volumes and planes are achieved by way of the lines or grid are virtually joined; the ratio of parts to the whole is changing and two and three dimensions are played against each other in a sophisticated manner.

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Susan Meyer: nude-topia, 2005, wood, HO-scale plastic figures and mixed media with soundtrack, dimensions variable

Susan Meyer: nude-topia, 2005, wood, HO-scale plastic figures and mixed media with soundtrack, dimensions variable

Susan Meyer: work in progress (detail), 2011, concrete, cardboard, acrylic, H-O scale figures, lights and succulent plants, dimensions variable

Susan Meyer: work in progress (detail), 2011, concrete, cardboard, acrylic, H-O scale figures, lights and succulent plants, dimensions variable

Susan Meyer: Swimming Hole, 2010, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures and aluminum, 10” x 7” x 7”

Susan Meyer: Swimming Hole, 2010, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures and aluminum, 10” x 7” x 7”

Shamai Gibsh

Shamai Gibsh's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

Owner of a Cramic Studio in Jaffa, Israel, Shamai Gibsh’s activities include wheel throwing, hand building and sculpturing.
My ceramic works are focused on esthetic designs. Techniques include: Saggar firings of objects covered with terra sigillata and terra sigillata printing, reduction, Raku and oxidation.

I get inspiration from my environment and surrounding. Jaffa, an 10,000 years old port city a part of Tel-Aviv  in Israel - a very old and full of history with its colors and textures, unique architecture and multinational has a big influence on me.
Typically  I burnish and cover with terra sigilata, at times I use copper and soluble salts (Metal chlorides like silver, gold, cobalt), and saggar fired inside clay vessels with organic materials typically pine needles.

For the last 11 years I’ve worked every summer at the Harvard ceramic Studio. My sculptural work an been inspired by the life in israel, the political situation in Israel, as well as my recent traveling to China and Korea. There I took a path of a single 3 dimensional object instead of using multiple objects like in my “wall” Aestela exhibition. Each one of these sculpture represents a wall-barrier.

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