Marianne McGrath: What I See, What I Saw II, 2011, unfired earthenware, plywood, steel rod, wax, 4’h x 10’l x 20’x

Marianne McGrath: What I See, What I Saw II, 2011, unfired earthenware, plywood, steel rod, wax, 4’h x 10’l x 20’x

Suzanne Stumpf: Nest with Eggs III, 2011, 10”w x 2.5”h, altered wheelthrown with handbuilt components; porcelain and porcelain paperclay; oxidation fired to cone 10
Both nests and eggs hold important concepts for reflection and meditation for me. Eggs represent new beginnings, promise, mystery, and fragility. Nests signify “home,” with the intention of comfort and protection, and in the case of wildlife, camouflage. As an avid birdwatcher, amateur naturalist, and sculptor, I am intrigued by the variety of nests found in nature for both their architectural inspiration and symbolism. These three works are from a series of nest sculptures I am making.

Suzanne Stumpf: Nest with Eggs III, 2011, 10”w x 2.5”h, altered wheelthrown with handbuilt components; porcelain and porcelain paperclay; oxidation fired to cone 10

Both nests and eggs hold important concepts for reflection and meditation for me. Eggs represent new beginnings, promise, mystery, and fragility. Nests signify “home,” with the intention of comfort and protection, and in the case of wildlife, camouflage. As an avid birdwatcher, amateur naturalist, and sculptor, I am intrigued by the variety of nests found in nature for both their architectural inspiration and symbolism. These three works are from a series of nest sculptures I am making.

Suzanne Stumpf: Egg Shell Nest, 2011, 16”w x 9.5”h x 10”d, handbuilt with porcelain paperclay; oxidation fired to cone 10Both nests and eggs hold important concepts for reflection and meditation for me. Eggs represent new beginnings, promise, mystery, and fragility. Nests signify “home,” with the intention of comfort and protection, and in the case of wildlife, camouflage. As an avid birdwatcher, amateur naturalist, and sculptor, I am intrigued by the variety of nests found in nature for both their architectural inspiration and symbolism. These three works are from a series of nest sculptures I am making.

Suzanne Stumpf: Egg Shell Nest, 2011, 16”w x 9.5”h x 10”d, handbuilt with porcelain paperclay; oxidation fired to cone 10

Both nests and eggs hold important concepts for reflection and meditation for me. Eggs represent new beginnings, promise, mystery, and fragility. Nests signify “home,” with the intention of comfort and protection, and in the case of wildlife, camouflage. As an avid birdwatcher, amateur naturalist, and sculptor, I am intrigued by the variety of nests found in nature for both their architectural inspiration and symbolism. These three works are from a series of nest sculptures I am making.

Suzanne Stumpf: Tubos, 2010, 28’w x 7”d x 11”h (total area as shown), handbuilt with porcelain paperclay; reduction fired to cone 10Interactive sculpture: evocative of deep sea life, but inspired by organ pipes.

Suzanne Stumpf: Tubos, 2010, 28’w x 7”d x 11”h (total area as shown), handbuilt with porcelain paperclay; reduction fired to cone 10

Interactive sculpture: evocative of deep sea life, but inspired by organ pipes.

Suzanne Stumpf: Urchin, 2010, 3”h x 11” w x 11” d, handbuilt porcelain with wheelthrown components; oxidation fired to cone 10Urchin is an interactive sculpture as well as a puzzle. There are 13 barnacle-like components that have been attached (through firing) to the perimeter of Urchin, and there are 10 others that are removable. The movable “barnacles” can be used to make multiple arrangements (on and off Urchin). However, Urchin is also a puzzle: there is only one way that the free “barnacles” can all be fit securely and comfortably into the center space.

Suzanne Stumpf: Urchin, 2010, 3”h x 11” w x 11” d, handbuilt porcelain with wheelthrown components; oxidation fired to cone 10

Urchin is an interactive sculpture as well as a puzzle. There are 13 barnacle-like components that have been attached (through firing) to the perimeter of Urchin, and there are 10 others that are removable. The movable “barnacles” can be used to make multiple arrangements (on and off Urchin). However, Urchin is also a puzzle: there is only one way that the free “barnacles” can all be fit securely and comfortably into the center space.

Suzanne Stumpf: Spike, 2008, 5.5”h x 8”w x 3” d, wheelthrown and altered porcelain with handbuilt components; black slip and shellac resist; oxidation fired to cone 10I am yet to meet a woman who does not smile knowingly or even laugh out loud when viewing “Spike.” “Für die Schönheit muß man leiden” — “For beauty, one must suffer.”
The fashion industry only seduced me into wearing too-high heels for a short time in my life. It was a long time ago, yet I do have a strong physical memory of how my feet felt after walking an unplanned distance or standing longer than anticipated in them.
“Spike” has innumerable permutations for viewing. When all of the black, orange, yellow, and white “pins” are removed, Spike is somewhat of a trompe l’oeil with the raised black dots disguising its holes. The pins at first glance seem to be playful pain indicators. Yet, because the pins are pointed on both ends, when we place them into Spike, can we feel also a wee bit of revenge?

Suzanne Stumpf: Spike, 2008, 5.5”h x 8”w x 3” d, wheelthrown and altered porcelain with handbuilt components; black slip and shellac resist; oxidation fired to cone 10

I am yet to meet a woman who does not smile knowingly or even laugh out loud when viewing “Spike.” “Für die Schönheit muß man leiden” — “For beauty, one must suffer.”

The fashion industry only seduced me into wearing too-high heels for a short time in my life. It was a long time ago, yet I do have a strong physical memory of how my feet felt after walking an unplanned distance or standing longer than anticipated in them.

“Spike” has innumerable permutations for viewing. When all of the black, orange, yellow, and white “pins” are removed, Spike is somewhat of a trompe l’oeil with the raised black dots disguising its holes. The pins at first glance seem to be playful pain indicators. Yet, because the pins are pointed on both ends, when we place them into Spike, can we feel also a wee bit of revenge?

Deborah Britt: Blue Pitcher Set, 8” x 13”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Blue Pitcher Set, 8” x 13”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Alien Vegetable I, 18” x 12”, Wheel-Thrown and Hand-Built with Slip Decoration, Wood-Fired Stoneware, Cone Ten, 2008

Deborah Britt: Alien Vegetable I, 18” x 12”, Wheel-Thrown and Hand-Built with Slip Decoration, Wood-Fired Stoneware, Cone Ten, 2008

Deborah Britt: Jaunty Pouring Vessel, 9” x 9”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Jaunty Pouring Vessel, 9” x 9”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Whisky Flask I, 5.5” x 6” x 4”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Whisky Flask I, 5.5” x 6” x 4”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Kathy Pallie: The 4 Elements – Earth, Wind, Fire, Water, Earthenware, glazes, 18”H x 14” Diameter, 2011

Kathy Pallie: The 4 Elements – Earth, Wind, Fire, Water, Earthenware, glazes, 18”H x 14” Diameter, 2011

Kathy Pallie

Kathy Pallie's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

"As a commercial artist designing products for retail store windows and interior displays, trade show booths and special events, I worked with many different materials to create three-dimensional objects. When I retired and started working with clay, I realized that clay was an exciting and wonderfully tactile material which I had to explore in depth. 
 
I’m intrigued with the concept that the artist’s hand can manipulate clay into a work of art which expresses an emotion, tells a story, can be functional or is purely visually appealing. At times, the clay seems to have a life of its own as it leads me, morphing from one form and concept to another. On other occasions, I can envision the completed piece before even touching the clay. 

Inspired by Nature, my work reflects the unlimited variety of textures, patterns, and energy I find in my natural surroundings. Texture and the tactile sense have always been an important part of my work. I hand build with clay slabs, coils, and extruded shapes and use various clay bodies, firing processes, glazes and cold finishes for making different forms and surface textures.

I enjoy creating artworks which not only express my love of Nature, but which also allow me to bring the essence of the outdoors into interior spaces.” Kathy Pallie

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