Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

Connections

Robert Montgomery: Echoes of Voices in the High Towers

The project is supported by mono.kultur, who will soon publish three books on Robert Montgomery with funds raised on Kickstarter.

CHANCE ENCOUNTERS IN THE STREETS
"Robert Montgomery is a fine artist based in London, whose work we first discovered a few years ago. Robert writes poems – but instead of publishing them in books, he sends them out into the public space in the form of large light installations or billboards in between advertising.

Robert never signs his work – so when you come across one if his billboards in the streets, you don’t really know where the message came from, but you immediately know who it is addressed to: it is addressed to you – to all of us. His work is not only breathtakingly beautiful, but it also conveys the sense of a very sincere and personal investment – it raises fundamental questions about the world we live in, and how we live in it.

Robert has an amazing way with words. You can instantly relate to his general unease with our modern life – but his works are also open-ended enough for you to bring in your own emotions and experience. They never preach, but rather want to communicate with you – to make you stop in your tracks, and to look at things in a different light.”

mono.kultur is an independent interview magazine based in Berlin, Germany. Their concept is as simple as it is beautiful: one issue, one artist, one conversation – no more, no less. And so every issue is dedicated entirely and exclusively to one artist from different genres – in the past seven years, they have been lucky enough to work with some amazing personalities, such as Tilda Swinton, Ryan McGinley, Ai Weiwei, The Wu-Tang Clan, Miranda July and many, many more.

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  • Tim Hawkinson - Mobius Ship, 2011

    Tim Hawkinson was born in San Francisco, California, in 1960. A graduate of San Jose State University, he later earned his MFA at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1989. Hawkinson is renowned for creating complex sculptural systems through surprisingly simple means. His installation, “Überorgan”—a stadium-size, fully automated bagpipe—was pieced together from bits of electrical hardware and several miles of inflated plastic sheeting. Hawkinson’s fascination with music and notation can also be seen in “Pentecost,” a work in which the artist tuned cardboard tubes and assembled them in the shape of a giant tree. On this tree, the artist placed twelve life-size robotic replicas of himself, and programmed them to beat out religious hymns at humorously irregular intervals. The source of inspiration for many of Hawkinson’s pieces has been the re-imagining of his own body, and what it means to make a self-portrait of this new or fictionalized body. In 1997, the artist created an exacting, two-inch-tall skeleton of a bird from his own fingernail parings, and later made a feather and egg from his own hair; believable even at a close distance, these works reveal Hawkinson’s attention to detail as well as his obsession with life, death, and the passage of time. Hawkinson has participated in numerous exhibitions in the United States and abroad, including the Venice Biennale (1999); Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (2000); the Power Plant, Toronto (2000); the Whitney Biennial (2002); and the 2003 Corcoran Biennial, Washington, DC. Tim Hawkinson resides in Los Angeles with his wife. (via)

    Tim Hawkinson on art21.

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    (Source: likeafieldmouse)


  • Leslie David - Painting Please!

    Painting series on Please! Magazine, for the special birthday Issue that Leslie David art directed.

    Photos by Nagi Sakai for Please! Magazine - Issue 11. (via)

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  • Mimicry Chairs by Nendo

    Japanese design studio Nendo has conceived a collection of ‘Mimicry Chairs’ composed of pressed and punched metal and lacquered white to give it a ghost-like aesthetic. The project’s philosophy is generated through reinterpreting and multiplying a single white chair in ten different ways, where the series will then appear in ten varying locations throughout the V&A Victoria & Albert Museum. During 2012 London Design Festival - the experience beginning in the main entrance of the museum. The journey then carries on throughout the space - positioning the chairs in galleries, staircases and corridors. each design has been carefully created to reflect and ‘mimic’ the location in which it is placed - poetically communicating the relationship an object shares with its environment. (via designboom)

    Photos by Daici Ano.

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    (Source: arpeggia)


  • Martin Creed on My Modern Metropolis
    Contemporary art doesn’t get much more fun than this! First created in 1998 with white balloons and then redone many times over, Half the Air in a Given Space is an interactive installation, by British artist Martin Creed, that’s comprised of hundreds or thousands of balloons of the same color. As the name suggests, half a room’s entire volume is filled with air-inflated balloons and then visitors are encouraged to walk through. “It is important to me,” says Creed, “that the situation is normal, that, as usual, the space is full of air; it’s just that half of it [is] inside the balloons.”

    Meant to evoke a sense of celebration and remembrance of childhood, the installation is almost guaranteed to leave everyone with a smile on their face.

    Last year, Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas was graced with 9,000 giant gold balloons that filled half of an eight-foot high gallery. To get a sense of what it feels like inside the room, Anna Merian of the Dallas Observer wrote, “People kept emerging from the balloons and startling each other — you’d feel totally alone and then suddenly, a face would come looming up out of the yellowness and you’d smile sheepishly at each other, then go back to flailing and squealing and butterfly-stroking your way through the balloons.”

    In Chicago, Creed has installed four versions of this work in neighborhoods throughout the city, choosing a different color balloon for each site. The first two installations (Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago) can be experienced through October 2nd and October 15th at the Hyde Park Art Center and Garfield Park Conservatory. In addition, this fantastically fun installation is coming to The Cleveland Museum of Art from September 30 through November 25, 2012. (via)

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  • Daehyun Kim Illustrations

    Daehyun Kim, also known as moonassi, is a young illustrator from Seoul, South Korea. Kim draws with a beautiful minimalistic approach. He shows an underlying theme of identity and human relationships with a background discipline in traditional Korean painting. (via)

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  • Mircea Cantor – Special Event at Transilvania International Film Festival 2012 / Cluj-Napoca, Romania
    June 1-10, 2012

    The Romanian artist often compared with Marcel Duchamp and scouted by the world’s distinguished galleries and museums, Mircea Cantor, will star in one of TIFF 2012’s special events.

    For the first time, a few of his video works will be screened in Romania, outside the space they were initially conceived for – the gallery. The artist will attend the screening, giving the audience in Cluj a chance to meet him and take part in discussions.

    „Mircea Cantor is on the gallery of Romanian artists who are far more known and valued abroad than in their home country. (…) The screening of his video short films in a cinema is a special program at TIFF by which we try to fix this abnormality”, says the artistic director of the festival, Mihai Chirilov.

    The audience will be able to view at Cluj eight of his video works, already included in the prestigious galleries and museums of the world as part of other exhibitions: 9+1=10? (2003-2005), Dead Time (2003), Departure (2005), Double Heads Matches (2002-2003), Nulle part ailleurs (2000), Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012), The Snow and the Man (2005), Tracking Happiness (2009).

    Mircea Cantor creates images that are at once crystalline in their clarity, yet deeply paradoxical. They are concerned with issues of memory, history, oppression, and the futility—and necessity—of hope. While his thematic concerns may reflect his identity as a Romanian-born artist, his work is also accessible and universal. As he has said, refusing to be pigeonholed by identification with one nation, “art is my country.”

    Mircea Cantor was born in 1977 in Oradea and, at the moment, lives in Paris. After moving to France in 2000, four years later Cantor won the most important award granted to young French artists – the Paul Ricard Award, one of his works being purchased by the Museum of Modern Art in Paris. In 2011, the Romanian artist received the prestigious Marcel Duchamp Award and this year he will host his own exhibition at Pompidou Centre in Paris.

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  • ACGA National Clay & Glass Exhibition: Call for entry

    ACGA National Clay & Glass Exhibition: Call for entry

    ACGA National Clay & Glass Exhibition: Call for entry
    Entry Deadline: October 31, 2012

    Dates: January 26 - March 1, 2013

    The ACGA National Clay & Glass Exhibition will take place January 26 – March 1, 2013 near Los Angeles at the City of Brea Art Gallery. The exhibition will showcase a wide range of handmade ceramic and glass artwork from across the United States.

    The juror is Carol Sauvion, Executive Director of Craft in America, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to presenting the history, practitioners and techniques of craft in the United States, and their impact on our nation’s cultural heritage. The centerpiece of the Craft in America effort is its production of a nationally broadcast documentary series celebrating American craft and the artists who bring it to life. The Peabody Award winning Craft in America series airs nationwide on PBS.

    The competition is open to all forms of handmade clay and glass: functional, decorative and sculptural. The deadline for submission is October 31th. The entry fee is $30 for three pieces of artwork. Awards will be given. The online entry form is available at www.acga.net.

    The Association of Clay and Glass Artists of California (ACGA) is a non-profit membership organization begun in 1945. It is dedicated to establishing and maintaining high standards of craftsmanship and design in clay and glass.

    Eligibility
    This competition is open to artists residing in the United States, 18 years or older. Artwork must be composed of at least 75% clay, glass, or a combination of the two, and may be functional or sculptural. All entries must be original and executed by the artist within the past two years. Works may not have been previously shown at the City of Brea Art Gallery.

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  • 1st Santorini Biennale of Arts: Open Call for Applications

    The Inaugural Santorini Biennale of Arts: Open Call for Applications 2012

    The Inaugural Santorini Biennale of Arts: Open Call for Ceramic Art
    Submissions: March 6 - May 19, 2012

    Dates: July 1 - September 30, 2012

    Within the framework of the 1st Santorini Biennale of Arts in 2012, ceramic artists and potters are invited to send in their artworks for consideration for this international exhibition at which a meeting of artists from all over the world will present their latest achievements.

    The 2012 theme, ‘The Past: Memory and Nostalgia’, will examine intrinsic experiences and social relationships, inspired by how humanity accumulates a catalog of our personal fabric and how these collected manifestations shape the patterns of our lives. The subject ‘The Past’ is an integral part of Ceramics. The medium reflects the Past by default. But we are asking for more than the obvious reference of technique, we want interpretations of scenarios, memories or objects from the Past, contemporary or otherwise. We want to forge pathways of communication linking the Past and Present. Special consideration will be given to artworks relating to Ceremony & Ritual and also to those that will form a connection with the space they will be presented within.  

    The mission of the Biennale is to promote both emerging and established artists through a wide variety of disciplines; from Drawing, Graphic Design, Illustration, Collage and Comics, through Paper, Painting, Glass, Sculpture and Ceramics, to Photography, Short Film, Video Art, Installation and Industrial Design.
    By means of an advanced framework of outreach activities the Biennale will also seek to cultivate the emerging spirit of the island, inviting all participants into an open dialogue concerning new ideas for social change.

    The curatorial team
    Dimitra Bratika and Michael Vlavianos (Photography), Sara Falanga (Glass Art and Graphic Art), iLya (Comics), Rajesh Punj (Sculpture and Installation), Alexa Kusber (Industrial Design), Tracey Holt Walkden (Ceramic Art), Tomas Poblete (Collage), Paola Gentili (Paper), Nicky Peacock (Illustration), Simon Tarrant (Painting), Anneca York (Drawing) and Holly Bynoe (Video Art and Short Film).

    The open call for artist submissions is from March 6 through May 19, 2012.

    For further information visit Santorini Biennale’s website.

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  • Patience EP by Lights Out!

    "Patience" EP is a series of six ambitious voyages through rock grooves and deep, blissed-out psychedelia. Warm, dreamy guitars creating sweeping soundscapes and a voice that will haunt you during your waking hours, stir you from your deepest sleep - let them drill themselves into your subconscious and broodingly melt you.

    Formed in February 2010, Lights Out! are a four-piece psychedelic/indie rock band. Consisting of high school students and friends Teo Retegan (vocals and keyboards), Andrei Bobiş (guitars), Andrei Sîncrăian (guitars), Oana Pop (drums) and former bass-player Alex Bondor, all from Cluj-Napoca, the band made its debut on the musical scene of this Northern Romanian city late April, the same year. A few months later, in November, Lights Out! managed to record their first demo, a song called “Inside Out”, that marked their first breakthrough as young musicians: the band won the popularity award at the 2nd edition of byron|Rock Your High School.

    The beginning of 2012 saw Lights Out! entering the studio to record a debut EP. Their first discographic effort, called “Patience” is to be released on April 7th.

    Teodora Retegan: Vocals / Keys
    Andrei Bobiș: Guitar / Bass
    Andrei Sîncraian: Guitar / Bass
    Oana Pop: Drums

    Follow Lights Out! on Facebook, Twitter, Last.fm and Soundcloud.

  • Shartle Symposium - Shifting Paradigms in Contemporary Ceramics / Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

    Shartle Symposium - Shifting Paradigms in Contemporary Ceramics at Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

    Shartle Symposium - Shifting Paradigms in Contemporary Ceramics / Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

    Saturday, March 03, 2012
    1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Shifting Paradigms in Contemporary Ceramics: The Garth Clark and Mark Del Vecchio Collection.

    Welcome and Opening Remarks
    - Cindi Strauss, MFAH assistant director, programming; curator, modern and contemporary decorative arts and design; organizing curator of the exhibition

    Sealed Capsule
    - Garth Clark, scholar, gallerist, and collector
    Is the 20th-century ceramics movement over? In the 21st century, is ceramics a fully accepted fine-arts material but no longer an autonomous discipline? If so, is this a good thing? Garth Clark examines a turning point in this millennia-old medium.

    On Conscripting Mugs and Other Ceramics into Life’s Battles for Independence
    - Ezra Shales, associate professor of art history, New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University
    In the field of ceramics, a distinction is often made between “functional” objects and “art” objects—a binary opposition that is both reductive and misleading. Ezra Shales critiques the validity of the term “functional” and investigates how drinking vessels remain key tools in the assertion of one’s identity.

    The Well-Wrought Urn
    - Jenni Sorkin, assistant professor, contemporary art and critical studies, School of Art, University of Houston
    This talk reconsiders Garth Clark’s groundbreaking exhibition American Ceramics, 1876 to the Present against the backdrop of mid-20th-century formalism, in particular Cleanth Brooks’s The Well-Wrought Urn (1947), Herbert Read’s criticism on modern sculpture, and the Syracuse Annuals exhibition series.

    From Postmodernism to Postindustrialism
    - Jorunn Veiteberg, professor of curatorial studies and craft theory, Bergen National Academy of the Arts, Norway
    A re-evaluation of the decorative and a reuse of historical forms were central to ceramics in the 1980s, the key decade of Postmodernism. But what has happened since? Are contemporary ceramics still Postmodern, or have new paradigmatic shifts taken place?

    Panel Discussion
    - Mark Del Vecchio joins the speakers. Moderated by Cindi Strauss.

    Reception
    - The audience is invited to a wine reception with the speakers in the lobby of the Beck Building, and to view the exhibition.

    This event is open to the public. Seating is limited. Free with general museum admission. MFAH Members always receive free general admission.

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  • Seiko Mikami - Desire of Codes

    This installation by Seiko Mikami, consisting of three parts, is currently set up in YCAM - Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media. Large number of tentacles-like devices with built-in cameras are placed across a huge wall, while six robotic “search arms” equipped with cameras and projectors are suspended from the ceiling tracking the visitors. Data is collected and assembled, presenting elements of past and present back to the viewer. Video

    (via amslu)

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