Interview with Deborah Britt - Spotlight, January 2012

Interview with ceramic artist Deborah Britt - Spotlight, January 2012

→ Subscribe to our monthly newsletter if you want to receive news and interviews with ceramic artists.
→ The full interview with Deborah Britt is featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two.

Ceramics Now Magazine
: You are in this field for more than ten years now; when exactly did it all start? Tell us how you discovered the passion for ceramics.

Deborah Britt: My passion for ceramics came rather late. Having been born and raised on a farm in Northwest Missouri, far away from big city influences, exposure to the arts was minimal. Art classes in my small-town school were non-existent past grade school—with a student body of 60 students in grades 1 through 12, resources were focused on the practical skills and knowledge essential to a farming community.

My interest in the arts began in college, where I was first exposed to fine arts through an Art Appreciation course. After earning a degree in Business, and subsequently a Masters Degree, I was firmly entrenched in the corporate world. The spark that ignited my interest in art, however, continued to smolder, but it wasn’t until I witnessed a wheel-throwing demonstration at a local art fair that my desire to delve into clay became real. After 13 years in business, I returned to school with a whole-hearted desire to master the art and craft of clay, ultimately earning a BFA degree in Ceramics. I have never looked back.


Deborah Britt Pottery -Ceramics

Blue Pitcher Set, 8” x 13”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011 - View Deborah Britt’s works

You are mostly creating pottery pieces. How would you explain your attraction for functional ceramics?

I was initially attracted to the wheel. Learning to throw basic utilitarian forms was a joy to me.  The tactile sensation of wet clay is so seductive! However, there are some ideas that cannot be conveyed by functional pots, thus I also do sculptural work. I like the idea of making work that is approachable both on an intimate and intellectual level.
Making functional work appeals to the part of me that wants to connect personally with the user. I love the idea that the work will be handled, and I strive to make work that goes beyond the basic utilitarian form. In other words, I strive to make the work “special” for the user, in an effort to elevate the mundane, e.g., drinking a cup of tea, into the conscious enjoyment of the daily ritual, rather than a routine act.

I love to play with form, so even in my functional work I like to bring in a sculptural sensibility. The functional and sculptural forms play off each other—one idea leads to the next—so for me, the back and forth of sculptural vs. functional is essential.

—- The full interview will be featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two.


There is a remarkable touch of sensibility in your decorations. Tell us more about how you decorate and where do you get inspiration from.

I am intrigued by the fact that we as humans are so connected to the earth, from the food we eat to the ceramic cup we drink from. I am drawn to relatively matte surfaces, perhaps because of their tactile nature or maybe because of their relationship to nature itself.

I want the clay to look like clay, and have been drawn to the salt firing process because of the ability to let the beauty of the clay body speak for itself as it fuses with salt. The element of surprise that arises from firing to firing with the phenomenon of flashing and variation of salt distribution has always held great interest for me.

Read More

Deborah Britt

Deborah Britt Pottery - Ceramics

Deborah Britt's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

“My work mainly consists of salt-fired Porcelain and Stoneware. The salt-firing process is unique in that salt is introduced into the kiln when it reaches the proper temperature (2345 degrees F for my work). Inside the kiln, the salt vaporizes and settles onto the pieces, forming its own glaze over the clay body. I also use various slips and glazes to further decorate the pots.

In my functional work, my goal is to make the pieces “special”. I hope that everyday users will appreciate being “in the moment” as they sip from their hand-made cup or enjoy soup from their favorite bowl.

My sculptural pieces all have specific meaning for me, but sometimes are just fun! I don’t wish to impose my views of the work upon others, but would rather viewers lend their own interpretation to the pieces within their own contexts and ideas. Most importantly, I hope the sculptures will inspire viewers to pause and consider how the piece relates to their lives.” Deborah Britt

Read More

Deborah Britt: Blue Pitcher Set, 8” x 13”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Blue Pitcher Set, 8” x 13”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Blue Butter Dish, 4” x 6”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Blue Butter Dish, 4” x 6”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Alien Vegetable I, 18” x 12”, Wheel-Thrown and Hand-Built with Slip Decoration, Wood-Fired Stoneware, Cone Ten, 2008

Deborah Britt: Alien Vegetable I, 18” x 12”, Wheel-Thrown and Hand-Built with Slip Decoration, Wood-Fired Stoneware, Cone Ten, 2008

Deborah Britt: Alien Vegetable, 20” x 14”, Hand-Built with Slip Decoration, Wood-Fired Stoneware, Cone Ten, 2008

Deborah Britt: Alien Vegetable, 20” x 14”, Hand-Built with Slip Decoration, Wood-Fired Stoneware, Cone Ten, 2008

Deborah Britt: Basket, 12” x 6”, Wheel-Thrown with Hand-Built and Wire Handle, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Basket, 12” x 6”, Wheel-Thrown with Hand-Built and Wire Handle, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Covered Casserole, 4.5” x 8.5”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Covered Casserole, 4.5” x 8.5”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Jaunty Pouring Vessel II, 9” x 7”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Jaunty Pouring Vessel II, 9” x 7”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Jaunty Pouring Vessel, 9” x 9”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Jaunty Pouring Vessel, 9” x 9”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Pitcher Set, 9” x 14”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

Deborah Britt: Pitcher Set, 9” x 14”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011