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Design

Esencia 2013 by Sanserif Creatius: Japanese and Valencian Craftsmanship / Valencia, Spain

Esencia 2013 by Sanserif Creatius: Japanese and Valencian Craftsmanship

Esencia 2013 by Sanserif Creatius: Japanese and Valencian Craftsmanship / Valencia, Spain
November 28, 2013 - February 28, 2014

The second edition of the Esencia project is inspired by the reflection of Japanese craftsmanship in the Valencian one and coordinated by Sanserif’s team of designers who worked together with 20 artisans from Alicante, Castellon and Valencia. The aim of this exhibition is to update the image of craftsmanship through the development of a heterogeneous universe of objects that transmit contemporary messages and meet the needs of contemporary society, by the use of traditional techniques and processes.

This investigation project, which annually turns into a travelling exhibition and was awarded in the last edition of the National Crafts Awards (Spain), has been chosen to be part of the official cultural acts to celebrate the Dual Year Spain-Japan, coinciding with the 400th anniversary of the mission of the Keicho Embassy in Europe.

Esencia 2013, which will stay in Valencia until the 28th February 2014, follows the same motto than the first edition, that is, to join the forces of craftsmanship and design in order to develop a collection of pieces where we find a hybridization of Japanese and Valencian tradition. The main objective is to make new products that bring additional values to the consumer, include new languages and fit in with new technologies, while having commercial viability.

The exhibition will show from jewellery to kitchenware, fashion accessories and decoration, all paying homage to the creativity of the craftsmanship of both cultures, in collaboration with different national organizations, like the Spanish Foundation for the Innovation in Crafts (Fundesarte), the Valencian Regional Government –through the Directorate-General of Trade and Consumption- the Gild of Tailors and Couturiers, the Gild of Master Confectioners of Valencia, and artisans of recognised standing like Juan Carlos Iñesta, Sara Sorribes, Marifé Navarro or José Marín, among others.

Actually, a selection of products from the exhibition will be included in the exclusive collections of Sibarita Shop, the first shop of the Arts and Crafts Centre of the Valencian Community. A place to buy pieces such us the olive oil clock Moments by Sara Sorribes and Sanserif Creatius, that had a honourable mention in the 2013 Tortona Design Week; the sheet music peg Score-clip by Sanserif Creatius, present at the Mussikmese 2013 in Frankfurt, among others.

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  • Containment: 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award / The Ian Potter Centre: NGV, Melbourne, Australia

    Containment: 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award / The Ian Potter Centre, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

    Containment: 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award / The Ian Potter Centre, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
    November 23, 2012 - July 21, 2013

    The theme of ‘containment’ will be explored by fourteen Victorian artists for the 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award.

    The Award focuses on contemporary design practice in Victoria and is arguably the most prestigious offered to a contemporary practitioner in Australia with a prize of $30,000 provided through the Cicely & Colin Rigg Bequest, managed by ANZ Trustees.

    Tony Ellwood, NGV Director, said, “This year’s Award presents an exciting mix of Victorian artists and reflects the NGV’s ongoing commitment to contemporary design. The NGV is only able to stage this important event thanks to the vision of the Trustees of the Rigg Bequest and the foresight of the generous benefactors, Cicely and Colin Rigg.”

    Teresa Zolnierkiewicz, Head of Philanthropy, ANZ Trustees, said, “The Rigg Bequest is a generous legacy of the late Colin Rigg (1895-1982). He was inspired by the Felton Bequest to create something in his own will that developed the arts in Victoria. This award, designed by the Trustees in partnership with the NGV, serves as a demonstration of the power of philanthropy to nurture and support artists and designers, vital to a thriving society.”

    The participating artists in 2012 are: Garry Bish, Robin Bold, Emma Davies, Mark Edgoose, Neville French, Titania Henderson, Marian Hosking, Richard Morrell, Ian Mowbray, David Pottinger, David Ray, Owen Rye, Yhonnie Scarce and Katherine Wheeler.

    Amanda Dunsmore, Curator, International Decorative Arts & Antiquities, NGV, said, “The choice of a theme for this year’s Award, rather than a specific area of practice, allows great scope for interpretation. Many of the works employ a sculptural aesthetic while remaining inherently functional, yet they play with the possibilities of what might be, beyond their practical value. Other works are presented in the context of a traditional concept.”

    Previous recipients of the Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award are Neville Assad-Sadha (1994) for ceramics, Robert Baines (1997) for metalwork, Louise Weaver (2003) for textiles, Sally Marsland (2006) for jewellery and Simone LeAmon (2009) for seated furniture.

    Emma Mayall, Assistant Curator, Contemporary Art, said, “This year’s group of artists represents a diverse mix of emerging and established practitioners. The vibrancy of Victorian design is highlighted through the wide range of practice and media represented, including ceramics, glass, metalwork, plastics and natural materials.”

    The recipient of the 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award is Marian Hosking. The prize of $30,000 was awarded to Ms Hosking for her work Clearing. Ms Hosking said, “It’s an honour to be chosen for an award that celebrates the diversity and vibrancy of contemporary Victorian craft and design. I’m overwhelmed to be selected from such a stellar group and appreciate that craft is visible within the National Gallery of Victoria.”

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  • L’usage des jours. 365 ceramic objects by Guillaume Bardet / Musée de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains, Lausanne

    L’usage des jours. 365 ceramic objects by Guillaume Bardet Musee de design et d'arts appliques contemporains, Lausanne

    L’usage des jours. 365 ceramic objects by Guillaume Bardet / Musée de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains, Lausanne
    March 27 - May 26, 2013

    Opening reception: Tuesday, March 26, 6 PM.

    During the period from September 21, 2009, until September 20, 2010, the French designer Guillaume Bardet drew one object a day. As an extension of this «artistic and human performance», from fall 2010 he saw to the creation of each object. He did so in collaboration with fourteen ceramists from the Dieulefit region (Rhône-Alpes, southeast France), where he had settled in 2009 in order to flee the Parisian hullabaloo.

    It took a good measure of determination, passion, enthusiasm and energy for Guillaume Bardet to become the hub of an alliance built up of individuals, companies, institutions and collectivities, all of whom agreed to join this human and creative adventure with him for an over two-year period. It also demanded a great deal of nerve and talent for the designer to bare himself, revealing not only his basic concerns and strokes of imagination, but also his weak spots, his doubts and his trial-and-error approach. And all this in order to uncompromisingly give their full due to his formal and aesthetic solutions.

    Guillaume Bardet entrusted the scenography for this itinerant exhibition to his friend, the designer Vincent Dupont-Rougier, insisting nonetheless on a preconception whereby time passes very slowly (a one-year period) and very rapidly (that of a single day). And this by resorting to elements in the service of simplicity, structuring and narration, so as to bring to mind both linearity and profusion, families and uses, moods and fancies.

    The exhibition also brings to light various phases of inspiration, the artist’s manner of working and his search for solutions. Interspersed among each of the seasons, information is provided alongside Guillaume Bardet’s sketches, his 3D drawings, and photographs, together with a written record of the remarkably fruitful dialogue Bardet inspired between himself and the many ceramists involved. In the words of one of the latter, Guillaume Bardet found out how to «tell a story» and «seek out the lines» in each of the forms he had designed and observed taking shape in the artisans’ hands.

    This outstanding personal challenge entailed a nigh-to-monacal and introspective approach in 2009; it was followed by a more collegial phase in 2010, climaxing in the production of 365 brand new ceramic works. These have since been presented as the theme of a monographic exhibition of a new kind, shown at several museums and exhibition venues partnering this initiative. The mudac represents the last lap on the exhibition’s itinerary, which included Sèvres («City of Ceramics») in France (near Paris), Le Grand Hornu Images in Belgium, the Château des Adhémar (Contemporary Art Center) in Montélimar (France), and the Maison de la Céramique du Pays de Dieulefit in 2012.

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  • Reviving the light: Zsolnay Ceramic Design / ILIAD, New York

    Reviving the light: Zsolnay Contemporary Ceramics, ILIAD, New York
    Zsolnay Contemporary Ceramics, ILIAD, New York - Work by Zsuzsa Fuzesi

    Reviving the light: Zsolnay Ceramic Design / ILIAD, New York
    October 17 - November 30, 2012

    Opening reception: Wednesday, October 17, from 6 - 8 pm

    Works by Eva Zeisel, Julia Kunin, Zsuzsa Füzesi, Viktor Erdei, Sándor Dobány, Edina Andrási.
    Curators: Julia Kunin and Andrea Megyes

    Balassi Institute New York and ILIAD are proud to present the exhibition Reviving the Light: New Zsolnay Eosin Ceramics, featuring contemporary designs by a select group of Hungarian and American artists prepared at the Zsolnay porcelain factory in Pécs, Hungary. The exhibition opens on October 17, 2012 at ILIAD and will be on view until November 30. The Zsolnay Porcelain Manufacturing Company, founded in the 1850’s, has been known to produce the finest in Hungarian ceramics, particularly during its “golden age” in the Art Nouveau and Secession periods at the turn of the 19th and early part of the 20th century. To revive old traditions lost during the Second World War and the Soviet occupation, six artists participated at a workshop held at the Siklós Ceramics Arts Center in southern Hungary in summer 2011. The aim of the workshop was to produce objects that would highlight Zsolnay’s traditional role in producing high-end ceramics and demonstrate the compatibility of techniques like eosin glaze with contemporary art and design. An express goal of the symposium: the presentation of those works in a special showing in New York City.The exhibition testifies to the unique reservoir of traditional techniques safeguarded at Zsolnay while showcasing the innovative potential for contemporary design highlighted by these iridescent and luminous glazes. Of special interest are a series of vases by Eva Zeisel, which she contributed to the Siklós symposium in 2011. These were originally designed for Royal Stafford, and now enriched with iridescent glazes. Re-contextualizing some of her late-career trademark designs, on view will be examples of select forms designed by her in 1983 when she was invited to collaborate with the Zsolnay factory. These designs for eosin-glaze pieces were first executed in 1998 in a limited number.

    Artists include Viktor Erdei, a young designer at the  Zsolnay factory, whose works re-imagine Art Nouveau in their invocations of natural forms. Sándor Dobány is an expert in architectural ceramic design, and creates fantastical porcelain objects painted with surreal imagery. Zsuzsa Füzesi’s Whimsical Vessels series in eosin glaze investigate the geometries of structure and matter, and Edina Andrási’s experimental deconstructions of historical Zsolnay vases create objects that are both evocative of and radically different from their original sources.

    Finally, New York-based artist Julia Kunin’s recent pieces explore concepts of excess, growth, and decay, often bringing to mind memento mori. The works incorporate iridescent glazes, which change constantly with the light, creating psychedelic surfaces on the baroque forms. Apart from her contribution as artist, Kunin both proposed the show to New York City partners and co-curated the exhibition.

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  • Scandinavian Design / Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

    Scandinavian Design / Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

    Scandinavian Design / Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    August 26, 2012 – January 27, 2013

    Scandinavian Design, drawn from the MFAH collection of decorative arts, showcases furniture, glass, ceramics, metalwork, and lighting from the 1920s to the 1970s. The MFAH first acquired examples of modern Finnish glass in 1954, and in recent years the museum has built on this history by acquiring outstanding objects by architects, designers and manufacturers such as Georg Jensen, Orrefors, Alvar Aalto, Bruno Mathsson, Kaj Franck, Timo Sarpaneva, Tapio Wirkkala, Poul Henningsen, Finn Juhl and Verner Panton.

    The objects created by designers active in Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Norway during the 20th century embody a distinctive aesthetic typified by an emphasis on high-quality design distributed widely through mass production. Often Minimalist, and characterized by clean lines, the Scandinavian design movement originated with a 1950s design show that traveled to the United States and Canada to showcase Nordic designers and the “Scandinavian way of living.” Scandinavian design influenced the development of Modernism in North America and Europe, and it continues to shape decorative arts today.

    This exhibition is organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Generous funding is provided by Dr. Marjorie G. Horning.

    Entrance to this exhibition is included with the museum admission. MFAH Members receive free general admission.

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  • Gustaf Nordenskiöld exhibition / Galerie NeC, Hong Kong

    Gustaf Nordenskiöld exhibition Galerie NeC Hong Kong

    Gustaf Nordenskiöld exhibition / Galerie NeC, Hong Kong
    August 24 - September 29, 2012

    Opening: Thursday, August 23, from 6 pm.

    Gustaf Nordenskiölds ceramic work deals with issues about functionality, primitivism, natural forces, and perceptible method. He is exploring the field between design, crafts, arts and industrial production.

    The exhibition consists of new museum collections, post production, the assembly of pre-existing and newly manufactured items, and works transformed to form new en-sembles. The exhibition presents ambivalent ceramic works, virgin archaeological objects of unknown origin that expresses beauty in the making, or in disrepair.

    "My intention is to create works in which the methods are a prerequisite for the final result, where traces of the process remains in the finished work.
    To freeze a moment for posterity. To preserve and display an action. What is worth preserving? Methods where the finished objects conveys trace of effort, different movement patterns or natural deformation/formation.”
    Traces, as a memory of its creation, Gustaf Nordenskiöld, 2012.

    In partnership with the Consulate General of Sweden, Hong Kong.

    Gallery Hours: Monday to Saturday, 11 am - 8 pm. Sunday, 1 - 6 pm.

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  • Langenthal retrospective / Musée Ariana, Geneva, Switzerland

    The Langenthal porcelain manufactory. From industrial design to Sunday china, Musee Ariana, Geneva

    Langenthal retrospective / Musée Ariana, Geneva, Switzerland
    May 23 - November 25, 2012

    Opening reception: Wednesday, May 22 at 6.30 pm.

    #1
    The Langenthal porcelain manufactory. From industrial design to Sunday china

    The fascinating history of the only 20th century Swiss porcelain factory began in 1906 in the Bernese town of Langenthal. Deeply rooted in the Swiss identity, the porcelain manufactory Langenthal SA – affectionately known by its workers as the “Porzi” – became noted for its cutting-edge technology, the diversity of its products as well as the quality of its porcelain. The artistic output followed the dominant aesthetic currents of the century while still preserving its local character. From Art Nouveau and Art Deco to the deliciously “vintage” designs of the 1950s and 1960s, from pseudo-rustic to avant-garde propositions, from collaborations with artists and designers to the influence of the artistic directors of the manufactory, the history of Langenthal is closely linked to the evolution of taste.

    This collaboration with the Langenthal manufactory has been an opportunity to update the rich archives : hand-painted design books, catalogues of forms and motifs, publicity leaflets and brochures, archive photos. Loans from public and private institutions enrich and complete the important collection of the Musée Ariana (over 1000 pieces). All the conditions have been met to allow a portrait to be drawn of 20th century industrial porcelain in Switzerland.

    The History of A Courageous Project
    When some notables of the Bernese town of Langenthal decided to found a porcelain manufactory in July 1906, they were armed with a good dose of courage and staunch enthusiasm. Indeed, after a century without any porcelain manufacture in Switzerland, there were no raw materials and, more particularly, no specialized local workforce available. They had to start completely from scratch in order to rewrite Switzerland into the porcelain history books.

    After a chaotic start, production became more organized and the manufactory began displaying its goods in specialized exhibitions and fairs with encouraging success. The outbreak of the First World War curbed this momentum. In 1937, in order to reduce its dependence on imported coal, the manufactory constructed the first 24-hour electric tunnel kiln. This technological breakthrough allowed the company to increase and diversify its production.
    After the Second World War, the manufactory enjoyed a heyday. The remarkable quality of the Swiss-made products enabled it to fight off the competitors. In 1964, the firm recorded the highest number of employees in its history, with 950 workers.

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  • SEATS 05: Sibylle Stoeckli, Christian Horisberger, Enzo Mari / Depot Basel, Switzerland

    SEATS 05: Sibylle Stoeckli, Christian Horisberger, Enzo Mari at Depot Basel, Switzerland

    SEATS 05: Sibylle Stoeckli, Christian Horisberger, Enzo Mari / Depot Basel, Switzerland
    March 24 - May 6, 2012

    On the 23rd March (17-20 pm), Depot Basel will opened its doors at their residence in Basel once again.

    Depot Basel takes on the topic of SEATS for the prelude of the 2012 season. A regular chair consists of four legs and a backrest, however, according to demands, a chair can also have three legs, diverse dimensions, shapes and outlines. We will take a close look at the past, present and future – of how chairs take shape and how they have changed with time.

    Sibylle Stoeckli and Christian Horisberger will re-interpret Enzo Mari’s “Do It Yourself” chairs from 1974. The workshop will be put into practice at Depot Basel together with the School of Design Basel – Renata Borer and Kuno Nussli.

    The project “Take a seat” initiated by AEKAE for “Café Z am Park” shows Horgen Glarus’ Classic 1-380 chair re-designed by various designers. Additionally, we show the favourite chairs of people from Basel.

    In co-operation with the Czech design collective OKOLO we will present an illustrated selection of unusual seating in the history of Modern Design in the form of a limited edition publication.

    Last but not least, the initiators of “Leuchtturm Kreative Wirtschaft” will round off our programme with the first talk of their new lecture series titled “MILK – Design dialogue #1” starting at 8 pm on Saturday, March 23.

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  • Annie Woodford

    Annie Woodford Contemporary Ceramics, featured artist on Ceramics Now Magazine

    Annie Woodford's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    Intrigued by the tenuous connection between past, present and future and the shadowy, illusive meaning of time, Annie Woodford makes work that is both haunting and enigmatic. Shifting boundaries between science and metaphysics and an enduring interest in parallel universe theory instill the pieces with a heightened intensity, whilst an obsession with hidden worlds has prompted her investigations into microscopy and the nano universe - making the unseen seen.

    Captivated by the natural world and our mysterious, infinite universe - whether seen at macroscopic or microscopic levels - she finds them the source of endless fascination and wonder. Mankind’s place within that universe and the dichotomy between our wish for progress and our proclivity for self-destruction, has become a central theme.

    A passion for frozen environments and the message they embrace, not only from the past but also for the future of our planet has resulted in research trips to the Arctic and Iceland and a detailed study of the coldest place on Earth – Antarctica.

    The work exhibits qualities that reflect the natural world, elements that highlight its beauty and transience. Fragile, frangible, complex and esoteric, delicately balanced between risk and control, her pieces float and oscillate between absence and presence, hovering silently in a place between.

    ‘Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere’ Blaise Pascal, mathematician, poet, philosopher.

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  • Annie Woodford: Piercing Rim, 2007, Porcelain, copper, stainless steel, 28x18x16 cm.

  • Swept Away: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design / MAD Museum, New York

    Swept Away exhibition: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design at MAD Museum, New York

    Swept Away: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design / MAD Museum, New York
    February 7 - August 12, 2012

    MAD (The Museum of Arts and Design) has explored the intersection of traditional or unusual materials and techniques as viewed through the lens of contemporary art and design in a series of exhibitions that include Radical Lace and Subversive Knitting; Second Lives: Remixing the Ordinary; Slash: Paper Under the Knife; Dead or Alive: Nature Becomes Art; and Otherworldly: Optical Delusions and Small Realities.

    The next investigation into unusual mediums features an international group of artists whose major materials are dust, ashes, dirt, and sand. Swept Away: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design will highlight works that deal with issues such as the ephemeral nature of art and life, the quality and content of memory, issues of loss and disintegration, and the detritus of human existence. Sculptures made from ash by Chinese artist Zhang Huan, life-size sculptures of unfired dirt by American artist James Croak, and works created from city smog by American artist Kim Abeles, among others, illustrate the transformative potential of humble, overlooked, and discarded materials.

    Swept Away Projects
    February 28, 2012 - May 14, 2012

    An extension of the Swept Away exhibition, Swept Away Projects will include a series of “live” installations occurring during the run of the exhibition that will allow audiences to experience and interact with artists and their site-specific installations made of ash, dust, sand, and dirt. The series includes a dust installation by Croatian Igor Eskinja, a sand installation by German artist Elvira Wersche, and a chalk installation by British artist Linda Florence. In some instances, visitor will actually get to sweep away the installations by walking through and touching them, participating in the ephemeral nature of these artists’ output.

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  • Joe Caroff: The Liberated Line / The Painting Center, New York

    Joe Caroff: The Liberated Line exhibition at The Painting Center, New York

    Joe Caroff: The Liberated Line / The Painting Center, New York
    March 27 - April 21, 2012

    The Painting Center is pleased to announce the opening of The Liberated Line, an exhibition of recent work by Joe Caroff. He was attracted to the creative freedom possible in book jacket design, and worked with many publishers. His first jacket design was for Norman Mailer’s The Naked and The Dead. His first film poster was for West Side Story. In 1963, Joseph Caroff designed the iconic 007 logo for United Artists and launched a long and distinguished graphic design career. When he observed the widening grasp of the computer and its inevitable descent into homogeneity in graphic design, Caroff sold his commercial art studio and began to paint. In his current work, the spontaneity and control that describe his world, coupled with the urge to manipulate form away from surface eventually matured in works where the flow of linear gesture continues on in independent space. In this thrust to “escape the canvas” he has consistently sought three-dimensional expression that challenges the canvas without abandoning its critical relationship. In his Terni series of 1986, three abstract shapes were produced with overlapping wooden sheets extending beyond the canvas. In the Iconic Metaphor series of 1990, he created works on 30 x 30 inch hollow core wood panels using leather, heavy paper and wood to construct illusionistic figures.

    For the past 30 years he has devoted himself to painting with insight and originality in response to, and frequently in reaction to the fashion of various endeavors currently popular. His interest in perception - both his own and that of the audience to the juxtaposition of flatness and three- dimensionality, has been a major focus; most recently in the works currently exhibited at The Painting Center. These reflect his previous investigations yet are pushing his thoughts forward, sparking ideas that he seeks to pursue.

    Caroff’s color is either subdued or theatrical depending upon its support of his linear choreography. It is either in complete contrast to the ground, or echoes one or other of the colors behind it. In these paintings, the lyrical quality of the line expresses the joy of liberation, declaring itself free of the gravity of the canvas. In pulling the line away from the surface, and turning it into a three-dimensional entity, another critical linear element follows: shadows that link the line back to its source on the surface and provide a bridge between the two. These are not airbrushed shadows as can be seen in some James Harvard paintings. These shadows are real and are integral to the final composition.

    Caroff has never been complacent. He is always inventing. In August, he turned 90.

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