Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

Editors Picks

David Claerbout. the time that remains / Parasol unit, London

David Claerbout. the time that remains exhibition Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London

David Claerbout. the time that remains / Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London
May 30 – August 10, 2012

Preview: 30 May 2012, 6.30 – 9 pm.

On 30 May 2012, Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art will preview a solo exhibition dedicated to the filmic works of the Belgian artist David Claerbout. The exhibition features works spanning Claerbout’s practice from 2000 to the present. The time that remains will be the artist’s first solo exhibition in a London public gallery.

Claerbout situates his striking work between the complex worlds of digital photography and film, investigating this intermediate area in concise and thought-provoking installations. Claerbout’s films often depict everyday activities or events, which once digitally manipulated negate the linear passage of time. His work questions the viewer’s conventional ideas of time and narrative processes.

Filmed in a house designed by contemporary architect Rem Koolhaas and using the same episode shot at ten-minute intervals from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Bordeaux Piece, 2004, lasts nearly fourteen hours. Three actors repeat flat dialogue and use dramatic gestures. They seem to be the protagonists of the work, but as time goes by the narrative slowly collapses into the movement of the sun and the changing light of day. A different sense of time is created and the protagonist is now the natural world. This work contains Claerbout’s first use of dialogue.

The Algiers’ Sections of a Happy Moment, 2008, is set on a small soccer pitch on a roof of the Algiers casbah. Young men, surrounded by a group of elderly people, pause in their game as one of the players feeds a flock of eager seagulls. The succession of images in this ‘happy moment’ provides a reflection on what Claerbout terms ‘the suspicious gaze’. The artist uses the passage of time as a tool for moderating that suspicious gaze, and more generally as a means of reconsidering what we see.

Set within the rigorous architecture of Skywood House, near Denham in the UK, Sunrise, 2009, takes the viewer into near-total darkness. The film depicts a nocturnal scene inside the villa, where a maid goes about her usual routine while the inhabitants sleep. The camera follows her through the course of her work and finally films her as she cycles home along a country road under the rising sun, accompanied by an imposing piece of music by Rachmaninov.

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  • ACGA National Clay & Glass Exhibition: Call for entry

    ACGA National Clay & Glass Exhibition: Call for entry

    ACGA National Clay & Glass Exhibition: Call for entry
    Entry Deadline: October 31, 2012

    Dates: January 26 - March 1, 2013

    The ACGA National Clay & Glass Exhibition will take place January 26 – March 1, 2013 near Los Angeles at the City of Brea Art Gallery. The exhibition will showcase a wide range of handmade ceramic and glass artwork from across the United States.

    The juror is Carol Sauvion, Executive Director of Craft in America, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to presenting the history, practitioners and techniques of craft in the United States, and their impact on our nation’s cultural heritage. The centerpiece of the Craft in America effort is its production of a nationally broadcast documentary series celebrating American craft and the artists who bring it to life. The Peabody Award winning Craft in America series airs nationwide on PBS.

    The competition is open to all forms of handmade clay and glass: functional, decorative and sculptural. The deadline for submission is October 31th. The entry fee is $30 for three pieces of artwork. Awards will be given. The online entry form is available at www.acga.net.

    The Association of Clay and Glass Artists of California (ACGA) is a non-profit membership organization begun in 1945. It is dedicated to establishing and maintaining high standards of craftsmanship and design in clay and glass.

    Eligibility
    This competition is open to artists residing in the United States, 18 years or older. Artwork must be composed of at least 75% clay, glass, or a combination of the two, and may be functional or sculptural. All entries must be original and executed by the artist within the past two years. Works may not have been previously shown at the City of Brea Art Gallery.

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  • 1st Santorini Biennale of Arts: Open Call for Applications

    The Inaugural Santorini Biennale of Arts: Open Call for Applications 2012

    The Inaugural Santorini Biennale of Arts: Open Call for Ceramic Art
    Submissions: March 6 - May 19, 2012

    Dates: July 1 - September 30, 2012

    Within the framework of the 1st Santorini Biennale of Arts in 2012, ceramic artists and potters are invited to send in their artworks for consideration for this international exhibition at which a meeting of artists from all over the world will present their latest achievements.

    The 2012 theme, ‘The Past: Memory and Nostalgia’, will examine intrinsic experiences and social relationships, inspired by how humanity accumulates a catalog of our personal fabric and how these collected manifestations shape the patterns of our lives. The subject ‘The Past’ is an integral part of Ceramics. The medium reflects the Past by default. But we are asking for more than the obvious reference of technique, we want interpretations of scenarios, memories or objects from the Past, contemporary or otherwise. We want to forge pathways of communication linking the Past and Present. Special consideration will be given to artworks relating to Ceremony & Ritual and also to those that will form a connection with the space they will be presented within.  

    The mission of the Biennale is to promote both emerging and established artists through a wide variety of disciplines; from Drawing, Graphic Design, Illustration, Collage and Comics, through Paper, Painting, Glass, Sculpture and Ceramics, to Photography, Short Film, Video Art, Installation and Industrial Design.
    By means of an advanced framework of outreach activities the Biennale will also seek to cultivate the emerging spirit of the island, inviting all participants into an open dialogue concerning new ideas for social change.

    The curatorial team
    Dimitra Bratika and Michael Vlavianos (Photography), Sara Falanga (Glass Art and Graphic Art), iLya (Comics), Rajesh Punj (Sculpture and Installation), Alexa Kusber (Industrial Design), Tracey Holt Walkden (Ceramic Art), Tomas Poblete (Collage), Paola Gentili (Paper), Nicky Peacock (Illustration), Simon Tarrant (Painting), Anneca York (Drawing) and Holly Bynoe (Video Art and Short Film).

    The open call for artist submissions is from March 6 through May 19, 2012.

    For further information visit Santorini Biennale’s website.

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  • Patience EP by Lights Out!

    "Patience" EP is a series of six ambitious voyages through rock grooves and deep, blissed-out psychedelia. Warm, dreamy guitars creating sweeping soundscapes and a voice that will haunt you during your waking hours, stir you from your deepest sleep - let them drill themselves into your subconscious and broodingly melt you.

    Formed in February 2010, Lights Out! are a four-piece psychedelic/indie rock band. Consisting of high school students and friends Teo Retegan (vocals and keyboards), Andrei Bobiş (guitars), Andrei Sîncrăian (guitars), Oana Pop (drums) and former bass-player Alex Bondor, all from Cluj-Napoca, the band made its debut on the musical scene of this Northern Romanian city late April, the same year. A few months later, in November, Lights Out! managed to record their first demo, a song called “Inside Out”, that marked their first breakthrough as young musicians: the band won the popularity award at the 2nd edition of byron|Rock Your High School.

    The beginning of 2012 saw Lights Out! entering the studio to record a debut EP. Their first discographic effort, called “Patience” is to be released on April 7th.

    Teodora Retegan: Vocals / Keys
    Andrei Bobiș: Guitar / Bass
    Andrei Sîncraian: Guitar / Bass
    Oana Pop: Drums

    Follow Lights Out! on Facebook, Twitter, Last.fm and Soundcloud.

  • The performance of Highly Strung featuring the giant 14 meter puppet took place on the night of October 28th 2011 during the Nati Frinj festival. The puppet took ten people to operate and had animation (largely created by the children at the local primary school) projected onto it from projectors mounted both on the ground and in the head of the puppet itself. Music by Stephen Oakes.

    Filmed by, Jacqui Schulz, Dave Jones, Gareth Llewellin and Cindi Drennan.

    More making of / behind the scenes stuff at theartofdave.blogspot.com.au/

    With so many other forms of entertainment the puppet shows of today may seem like an already dead medium. However, you’d be wrong in thinking this, since Australian filmmaker Dave Jones shows us that there is still a fair amount of life in the ancient form of storytelling with his highly ambitious piece, “Highly Strung.”

    Performed on the back of grain silos, “Highly Strung” features an enormous 45-foot tall puppet that took 10 people to operate. The giant work of art was bolstered by projected animation done largely by local school children, giving the production an eerie Tim Burton vibe. This particular performance took place at the Nati Frinj festival in Natimuk, Australia.

    Jones said of the animation, “For the mouth we actually mounted a projector inside the puppets head and gaffer taped it to an iPod which we could control wirelessly from the ground 20 meters below.” Though it is just a five minute edit of the whole performance, the clip is captivating, immersing the viewer in a bizarre, but ultimately innocent world of dreams and wonderment. (via the Huffington Post)

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