Jean and Jacqueline Lerat Tribute / Galerie Capazza, Nançay, Paris

Jean and Jacqueline Lerat Tribute Galerie Capazza, Nancay Paris

Jean and Jacqueline Lerat Tribute / Galerie Capazza, Nançay, Paris
September 29 - December 2, 2012

Openning reception: Saturday, September 29th, 5-8 pm.

To welcome today the artworks of Jean and Jacqueline Lerat is an honor, a recognition. We are proud and moved to have published this book, and we will do our best to present «their treasures», which let us hope to deserve the confidence granted by François and Claire Lerat, their children.
Gérard Capazza

Is it pretentious to consider the artwork as an haiku, a so marginal poem.
This is no about ceramics but creation.
I am not interested in the enamels skills. Skills, technique, are situated before creation. The structure maybe? As for the skeleton, you have to add something. Questions have been asked in a dense way.
Somehow, life has imposed.
Then, you could go from the “object situation” to the “creation situation”.
Jacqueline Lerat, May 5th, 1993

It is fundamental that beauty and meaning depend on the person who look at the piece as much as the quality of the work. The artist has the right to be misunderstood, privilege that «the official artist» refuses by his will to set up in advance the way people will per- ceive his work.
Modestly assuming their function, but always overflowing when they are admired, the ceramics of Jean and Jacqueline Lerat oppose the demanding nature of relationship to the whims of actuality…
Bernard Noël, extract of the book Jean et Jacqueline Lerat, éditions Galerie Capazza

Jean Lerat Ceramics - Rocher Noir

Jean (1913-1992) and Jacqueline (1920-2009) LERAT Biography
Jean Lerat’s family is an old family from Berry (French province), where you can find farmers, cabinet makers, horse breeders, Antique dealers. Jean starts at the Fine Arts school in Bourges to learn wood sculpture. Then, he concentrates on sculpture, drawing and landscapes painting. The encounter with François Guillaume will change his life. Dealer, designer and crockery editor in Bourges since the 30’s, he has a lot of contacts with the ceramics and glass factories which realize his models for the French restaurants. He asks Jean Lerat to work in La Borne in 1941, to “renew the pottery tradition fo the village”. He rents a workshop and asks Armand Bedu to supply Jean with the needed materials and to fire the pieces that will be sold in the shop.

In December 1942, Jean Favière, who works at the Berry Museum, and Henri Malvaux, new director of the Fine Arts school in Bourges, start showing interest to the craft productions of la Borne. The village is already renowned by Parisian institutions (Museum of the Decorative Arts, Ceramics Museum of Sèvres) for its authenticity.

Henri Malvaux asks Jacqueline Bouvet to come to La Borne in July 1943. She is allowed to stay until May 1944 thanks to an agreement with François Guillaume. Jean and Jacqueline get married on February 3rd of 1945. They will work in the same place, but they will follow a personal path. But they share clay, enamels and firing.

In 1955 they moved to Bourges, building a new wood-firing kiln and beginning to create more sculptural and abstracted works. While an attentive observation should lead the collector to distinguish their style, they adopt a mutual signature JLERAT from 1945 to 1948, then JLERAT from 1948 to Jean’s death. After 1992, Jacqueline starts again to sign JLERAT.

Their collaboration in ceramics is considered to be among the most important in post- war France. Their teaching at the Ecole Nationale des Beaux Arts in Bourges has influen- ced new generations of potters.

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Jean-François Fouilhoux / Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France

Jean-François Fouilhoux, stoneware sculpture exhibition Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France

Jean-François Fouilhoux, stoneware sculpture / Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France
17th March - 17th June 2012

Opening reception: Saturday, March 17th, 5.00pm

I love clay.
I’m always moved to see the mark made by my fingers in soil.
Clay remembers their lightest touch and retains the slightest motion transmitted to it.
The mildest inflection – or even hesitation – leaves its trace.
It is a recorder of emotions. Hasn’t a scientist said that given the right tools, one could hear the sounds generated in the studio when a pot is being thrown because they are etched into its surface, like the first recordings of voices on wax cylinders? This highly singular property of clay is all the richer because the firing sets these marks and preserves their traces.
Like the wall of a cave and pigment, or paper and pencil, clay engages with the hands and the body.
I write in the soil.
My pencil? A flexible blade that I bend at will. My medium? A wall of clay.
I sketch in space by drawing the blade through the wall and slicing into its thickness.
The line is a continuous one, just as with writing, and the volume takes form blindly, as imagined by the gesture.
The form is then composed of two interlocking elements, separated by a small gap.
We could say that each is a mould or an impression of the other, with a space that Marcel Duchamp defined as being ‘infra-thin’. They are born of the same gesture: the trace left by the motion of the flexible blade is all that ultimately interests me.
I then sacrifice one of the two parts, which I destroy to allow the impression of the gesture to appear.
Traces of energy, of tension… Like a calligrapher, I have meditated on the gesture before executing it. It is a sort of dance or ritual in which the movement is expansive, dynamic, continuous and without regrets.The goal is freeing up the sensitive impression, after a privileged moment, by emptying its material content and reducing it to a skin,
then bringing it to life as if suspended in the void… and simply capturing the energy of the gesture expressed in space…
This is yet another story of fullness and emptiness, which is recurrent in ceramics. It is also the story of celadon – translucent – another symbol for completeness and void: both matter and light.

Jean-François Fouilhoux

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Tribute to George Jeanclos - Clay and bronze / Exhibition - Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France

Tribute to George Jeanclos - Clay and bronze

Georges Jeanclos (1933-1997) is one of France’s great twentieth-century sculptors. His œuvre is rooted in the traumatic events of the Second World War. To escape the round-ups that threatened French Jews, his family was forced to hide in the woods ; Jeanclos, barely ten at the time, had several close brushes with death. When the country was liberated, he saw the corpses of former collaborationists strung up from lampposts ; shortly thereafter, he discovered the skeletal bodies of camp survivors. Decades later, Jeanclos would respond to these seminal events : not by locking himself away in his own experience but by opening up to universality and paying attention to all forms of suffering, past and present ; not by representing horror, but by finding within himself the strength to create beauty.

Jeanclos’ choice medium was clay. He transformed it into thin sheets with which he then shaped human figures. Simultaneously children and adults, men and women, their faces are almost identical. Some are dormeurs resting beneath a coverlet of clay ; others are hidden within urns bearing Hebrew letters drawn from the Kaddish; others are boat travellers bound for the Beyond; still others are kamakuras, meditating bonzes lost in contemplation of the soul’s gardens. To all these, Jeanclos would later add Pietas, amorous Adams and Eves, couples tenderly grazing or stroking one another other. His images reveal both the undeniable weakness of human beings and the invincible strengh of love ; by the simple fact of their existence, they help us to live.

The present show consists of some sixty works in clay and bronze, representing all the periods of Jeanclos’ career. (Tzvetan Todorov)

19 March - 26 June 2011
Galerie Capazza / Nançay / France

Exhibition space: Grenier de Villâtre, 18330 Nançay, France
T.: +33.(0)2.48.51.80.22 / contact@capazza-galerie.com / http://www.galerie-capazza.com/

Capazza Gallery, a superbly restored place of historic interest (from the XVIIth century), connected with the castle of Nançay, is located in the heart of the Sologne, about 90 minutes from Paris and close to the Loire Valley. In exceptional surroundings of 2000 m², you can admire the works of 80 artists with international reputation. These artist represent contemporary art in the most important fields of Fine Arts.

Georges Jeanclos' profile - View his works