Shane Porter

Shane Porter's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

Read the interview with Shane Porter, Spotlight - May 2011

“My current practice explores the role and function of the vessel within ritual theory and practice. The Vessel contains and protects liquid which during the mass is transubstantiated from wine to the literal blood of Christ. I seek to convey feelings of silence, reflection and reverence by abstracting and subverting religious connotations and metaphors, referencing my uncertainty.” Shane Porter

Shane Porter graduated from the University of Ulster in 2010 with a 1st Class Honours degree in Fine and Applied Art.

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Interview with Shane Porter - Recognized artist, May 2011

Interview with ceramic artist Shane Porter - Spotlight - Recognized artist, May 2011

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Ceramics Now Magazine
: In what techniques do you usually work and what materials do you use?

Shane Porter: My practice is multi-disciplinary in nature, from the way I draw, plan installations and think about different concepts. These areas intertwine from the research that informs my work- by rough scribbled drawings on scraps of paper, to precise computer aided illustrations. I usually need to see my pieces in three dimensions before going any further so after the initial drawing stage, I will construct rough maquettes (usually made from paper, card etc.) to get a sense of scale and presence. The series Vessels 2010 were first made from turned plaster using a lathe and from that initial investigation I played with scale and proportions before turning to clay to make the finished objects. Vessels 2010 were made in two separate stages. A bowl-like press mould was made and a large mass of white stoneware was pinched into it so to not create any seams. A top was then made from a slab of clay and the rather rough pieces where joined together and then slow dried for 4 days. The pieces were then turned on the wheel to create the desired form and finish. I am interested in clinical forms, which flirt with the idea of mass production, but which disrupt this notion by subtle marks of the maker. 


What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces?

“If anyone wishes to come after me, let him deny himself, take up his cross and follow me.”- Matthew 16:24

My work explores the role and function of the Vessel within ritual theory and practice. I am currently developing a new body of Vessels which are inspired by the practice of Corporal Mortification used in Orthodox Christian traditions.  Corporal Mortification is the practice of inflicting pain on the body as a type of spiritual psychology which uses the ‘body to affect the mind’, punishing man for carnal desires and indulgences, therefore becoming closer to the divine.

This work is still in an early stage of development and I am beginning to create a series of porcelain paper clay Vessels which challenge the function and ergonomics of the ritual container. I am interested in juxtaposing materials in unusual ways which enable the viewer to question the various connotations which are deep rooted in society. I manipulate typography, clay and organic materials to create narratives and conversations across the work.

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