Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

art


Ryan Blackwell: Untitled (Red Rectangle), details, 2012, Table Top, Clay, Oil, Acrylic, Curtain Wire, 41 x 28 x 2 in.


  • Ryan Blackwell: Yellow, Table, Curtain Wire and Trowel, 2012, Table Top, Clay, Curtain Wire, Trowel, Oil, Resin, Wood Glue, 72 x 40 x 15 in.

  • Ryan Blackwell: Untitled (Red Rectangle), 2012, Table Top, Clay, Oil, Acrylic, Curtain Wire, 41 x 28 x 2 in.


  • Ryan Blackwell: Untitled (White Shelf), 2012, Shelf, Clay, Oil, Acrylic, Resin, Wood Glue, Hardware, 43.25 x 10.25 x 2 in.

  • Ryan Blackwell: Self Portrait: Spring 2010, Animal Bones, Clay, Resin, Wood, 18 x 11 x 2 in.

  • Month in Review: October 2012

    Month in Review on Ceramics Now Magazine: October 2012, Courtesy Tanoue Shinya

    Hello everyone and welcome to our Month in Review, a summary of the last month of activity on Ceramics Now. Subscribe to our monthly newsletter and follow us on Facebook and Twitter to receive the latest news.
    Check the Subscription offers on our Magazine shop.

    This month’s featured interviews (view list):

    Patricia Sannit - Artist of the month
    Annie Woodford - Spotlight
    Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso - Spotlight
    Anti-Utopias / Sabin Borş - EXTRA!

    This month’s special feature (ongoing - interviews):

    Romanian Contemporary Ceramics
    Eugenia Pop - In memoriam
    Arina Ailincăi
    Marta Jakobovits
    Cristina Popescu Russu
    Bogdan Teodorescu

    This month’s featured exhibitions:

    Ceramics Now Exhibition 3rd / Galateea Gallery, Bucharest
    Francesca DiMattio / Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London
    The Open West 2012 Award Winners exhibition / England
    Caroline Andrin & Francois Ruegg / Puls Ceramics, Brussels
    Melissa Stern: The Talking Cure / Smart Clothes, New York
    Anne Tophøj and Marianne Nielsen / Copenhagen Ceramics
    Cynthia Lahti exhibition / Zentrum für Keramik, Berlin
    Kim Simonsson / Galerie Favardin & de Verneuil, Paris
    Mark Goudy & Liza Riddle / SMAart Gallery, San Francisco
    When I Woke / Llantarnam Grange Arts Centre, Wales
    Three exhibitions at The Clay Studio, Philadelphia, PA
    German Op-Art Ceramics / University of Arizona Museum

    This month’s featured connections:

    Jannis Kounellis / Parasol unit foundation, London
    Olaf Breuning: Human Nature / Pippy Houldsworth Gallery
    Yin&Yang Parisienne Mix for Ceramics Now, October 2012
    The reopening of Fabrica de Pensule 2012 / Cluj-Napoca
    Carsten Nicolai - Unidisplay projection wall installation

    This month’s news on Ceramics Now:

    Published: Guideline for sponsorships and submissions

    Next month’s news:

    The launch of Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two

    For media partnerships or sponsorship please contact Vasi Hîrdo, Editor, at vasi@ceramicsnow.org
    Submissions and general info: office@ceramicsnow.org

  • Marie Torbensdatter Hermann exhibition / Galerie Nec, Paris

    Marie Torbensdatter Hermann exhibition Galerie Nec, Paris

    Marie Torbensdatter Hermann exhibition / Galerie Nec, Paris
    October 26 - November 24, 2012

    "The work reflects on some kind of strange family of domestic objects, they are bound together by a form of action, something undefinable but with a hint of a purpose. As if they are there for one very specific reason, each with a small specific individual function, but on their own they are un-significant, it is as a group how they become useful and self-sufficient. It is in the choice of grouping certain objects with each other and in the spacing of them, that they come into existence. I also see a big part of my practice as an arranger. Someone arranges objects and creates small details, small shots taken from a lager scenario. As if we have the time line in constant flux, I make the decision on where to cut out one image and create that as a memory of what ones was, before it moved on to become something else." Marie T. Hermann

    “Looking around Marie T. Hermann’s most recent exhibition of work, we may well have a similar feeling: that we are in the presence of pots that don’t quite need us. They are just fine on their own, thank you. Poised atop their handmade clay shelves, microcosms like the implacably calm still life paintings of Morandi, or set out in a neat ring on the gallery floor, these ceramic sculptures have a quiet assurance, an ease that belies the difficulty of their own making.

    You almost have to remind yourself that it’s by no means easy to create this sense of completeness. The usual way of doing it is to make objects that are resolutely alien to everyday experience: the abstract geometries of De Stijl, the weird and hermetic object-poems of the Surrealists, the industrial quality of Minimalist sculpture, or the unearthly light and space created by artist James Turrell. While Hermann’s work is influenced by all of these art historical references, she appeals to something more humble and humane than any of them. As is true of most potters, even those working in the manner of installation artists, daily use is constantly at issue for her – either as a haunting presence or a conspicuous absence. The inclusion of two plates, one sunk into its shelf and the other just emerging, gratifies our expectations on this score, even as the closing off of vases at the mouth refuses it.

    While her commitment to achieving a unified aesthetic impression is total, it seems to me that her greatest interest as an artist comes at the level of the detail. Yes, she knows she must (according to some modernist logic) ‘earn’ the right to create an interesting shape, like a sharp break in the profile of a vase, or a gentle curve in the rim of a plate. For her, these subtle touches have to make sense within an overriding context.

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  • Francesca DiMattio: Bloemenhouder and Kandelaar / Pippy Houldsworth, London

    Francesca DiMattio: Bloemenhouder and Kandelaar exhibition Pippy Houldsworth Gallery London

    Francesca DiMattio: Bloemenhouder and Kandelaar / Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London
    October 10 - November 17, 2012

    Pippy Houldsworth Gallery is delighted to present young New York artist Francesca DiMattio’s first solo exhibition in Europe from 10 October to 17 November 2012, and her first showing in London since her large scale canvases were seen in Saatchi Gallery’s Abstract America in 2009. Bloemenhouder and Kandelaar offers us the opportunity to see DiMattio’s vibrant and painterly sculptures standing on their own, showing the vitality and eccentricity of the large-scale ceramic pieces she has been developing over the past two years.

    DiMattio’s paintings have often made reference to feminine craft techniques such as sewing, weaving or quilt making. In an attempt to shift the assumption that these crafts are most often delicate or small-scale domestic creations, she scales them up and uses a rougher, more masculine hand. Keeping with an interest in domestic craft, it is fitting that her sculptures are formed from ceramic. Using a material deeply ingrained in rules, craft and history, she turns it on its head by irreverently pulling from its history and pairing extravagant reference with crude slabs marked by fingers and punch marks.

    In this exhibition, DiMattio investigates the history of porcelain to examine the ways in which visual iconography moves through culture. She looks at how porcelain’s visual history is one of copies, fakes and re-makes; how a revered technique such as the blue and white design found on a Ming Vase was copied by the English, Dutch and French, morphing and changing slightly through each iteration, and can now be found on a kitsch object in a gift shop. Like her paintings, the sculptures here juxtapose conflicting historical references, from 18th century English Wedgwood, French Rococo and Ming Dynasty to kitsch animal figurines. These are grafted objects, fusing disparate elements into a curious new whole. Each piece is made completely as one, rather than from found forms put together after the firing. The different passages affect one another, with glaze from one element interrupting, transforming and connecting multiple facets of the same sculpture.

    DiMattio’s new work incorporates bases and handles of various forms, from gilded heaps of clay to delicately sculpted adorning flowers. Bases of piled up clay are reminiscent of Chris Ofili’s elephant dung, whilst a slumping torso-like coil pot seems on the verge of collapse. Debris made by sculpting animalia has been collected and put on the adjacent surface, creating a rough texture made of dust, chunks and trimmings, and elements in high gloss sit next to bright matte colour. DiMattio creates unstable and shifting objects that are a combination of various logics of taste. In Cuvette à Tombeau, one moment the china-painted landscape is beautiful and the bright rough-textured yellow feels broken, crude or flawed, and on a second look, the texture becomes vibrant and rich, whilst the landscape becomes something you might find in a thrift shop. The changeability of taste is heightened and examined through DiMattio’s uncanny pairings that ask the viewer to look closely at and interrogate these new abstract and de-hierarchised forms.

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  • The Open West 2012 Award Winners exhibition / Gardens Gallery, Cheltenham, UK

    The Open West 2012 Award Winners exhibition Cheltenham

    The Open West 2012 Award Winners exhibition / Gardens Gallery, Cheltenham, UK
    November 15-20, 2012

    Private view: Thursday, November 15, 6 pm.

    Artists: James P. Graham, Haruka Miyamoto, Koji Shiraya.

    Following the open west’s acclaimed exhibition at Gloucester Cathedral earlier this year, curators Lyn Cluer Coleman and Sarah Goodwin are now presenting an exhibition of the three award winners, James P Graham (University of Gloucestershire Award) Haruka Miyamoto (Ecotricity Award) and Koji Shiraya (Curators Award).
    This year’s award winning artists are connected by their concerns for the environment, showing acute awareness of the origins of the materials they use, from base metals to volcanic rock, leather, waste rubber and plastic, porcelain and feldspar.

    James P Graham lives and works in Italy and London and exhibits internationally. Originally trained in film and photography, James’ recent sculptural work is informed by landscape and nature. His new sculpture, Golden Cage, coming to Cheltenham directly from the Chelsea Physic Garden, uses volcanic rocks from the active crater on Stromboli, which have been wound and suspended with gold thread. The work “symbolises man’s attempts to imprison and control nature,” (CNN, Eco Solutions, 20.7.12).

    Haruka Miyamoto lives and works in London. Her training is in textiles (recently graduated from Chelsea College of Art & Design) and she works as a fashion, shoe and product designer as well as an artist. “The idea of my work is based on lifecycles in nature. I rescue materials from the bin and give them a second life, so they don’t end up in landfill. The impact that humans have on nature can be devastating. The dodo, which became extinct due to human activities, is a symbol of extinction.” Haruka showed in British-ish, the best of the UAL design graduates at the V&A for London Design Festival, and auctioned her work ‘Extraordinary Rubbish’ in the Faberge Egg Hunt 2011.

    Koji Shiraya who works in London and is soon to return to Japan, is an artist who completed his MA in Ceramics and Glass in 2010 at the Royal College of Art. His work After the Dream shown in the darkened crypt at Gloucester Cathedral captured an intriguing ambiguity, using porcelain spheres as metaphors for the mind, and its Gardens Gallery setting will stimulate a new language. In his sculpture Trinary 2011 all of the samples in the jars are filled with some of the main components of the earth’s crust. Koji has shown work at Einfall: Beyond Spontaneity at the Freud Museum and at Designers & Makers at Somerset House.

    Applications for the open west 2013 will be received from December. See theopenwest.org.uk for full details.

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  • Caroline Andrin and Francois Ruegg / Puls Ceramics, Brussels

    Caroline Andrin and Francois Ruegg / Puls Ceramics, Brussels
    October 13 - November 17, 2012

    Caroline Andrin exhibition Puls Ceramics, Brussels

    Caroline Andrin
    Swiss ceramist Caroline Andrin maintains her studio in Brussels as well as holding the Ceramics Department chair at La Cambre. Widely traveled and exhibited, this is her second Puls exhibition. Andrin has entitled this series of work Skin Game.

    Much of Andrin’s art has been inspired by the examination of the intimate relationship that we have with the objects in our everyday environment, objects that we wear or use. Throughout her career, Andrin’s work has developed from one object to the next, sometimes by taking into consideration the function of the original object and sometimes by a larger context. She has been inspired by the principle that every form hides another form within it and that through a process of her own using clay, both the inside and the outside of an object can be made visible.

    The title of this series is particularly apt. It asks many questions. Skin: what is it, when and where do we encounter it, and what deeper consequences does it hold for us as individuals and our values. We seldom pause to remember that the skin of a mammal—and specifically humans—is the largest organ in the body. As for game, is it the mere entertainment of stalking and bringing back a trophy to hang on a wall or the hides that kept our prehistoric ancestors alive through the Ice Ages?

    The series consists of an ensemble of Trophies and Accessories. Game here of course assumes its double meaning, referring to play as well as hunting.

    Andrin pits our visual perception against our sense of touch. She has captured the visual qualities of skin and then assaults the innate coordination of our sense with entirely the wrong texture. The work certainly has the look but not feel. She is challenging the very essence of the materiality we expect.

    Each Trophy originates from a pair of leather gloves. The gloves are turned inside out, cut up and sewn back together in order to make a mold into which clay is poured. This process involves the casting of clay slip. Traditionally clay is cast in plaster molds. Since 1996 however, she has used material for molds that leave a trace on the final object. This is a verification of the idea that one form contains another.

    The manipulation of the original object (the leather glove) creates an imaginary bestiary which speaks of the skin. Andrin examines our emotional relationship with objects and in this case, all that the objects represent.

    Francois Ruegg exhibition Puls Ceramics, Brussels

    Francois Ruegg
    Francois Ruegg is an award winning Swiss ceramist exhibited at Puls for the first time. Ruegg intentionally uses allegory to color the figurative presence of his objects and their complex allusions. He plays with our innermost expectations, our stereotypes, and sends us on strange trains of thought. Ruegg deliberately leads us astray as he challenges our internalized landmarks and creates confusion in our perceptions. This is work that provokes, destabilizes, and opens up only enough to give up a few clues to understanding.

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  • Jannis Kounellis / Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London

    Jannis Kounellis exhibition Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London

    Jannis Kounellis / Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London
    28 November 2012 – 24 February 2013

    Preview: November 27, 2012, 6:30 – 9:00 pm.

    Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art is delighted to present a solo exhibition of works by painter, sculptor and performance artist Jannis Kounellis from 28 November 2012 to 24 February 2013 (Private View, 27 November 2012).

    Considered a protagonist of Arte Povera, an art movement that emerged in Italy during the 1960s, Kounellis embarked on his artistic career by creating some of the most radical art works of the time. Often combining the inanimate and animate, he boldly incorporated things such as propane torches, plants and animals as integral if not vital parts of his works. He also introduced the notion of performance within works of art, something that to this day continues to inspire artists around the world. In all these works Kounellis drew from his deep knowledge of and sensitivity to cultures of the past and his own heritage, in itself a spirited discussion between collective and personal experiences.

    The exhibition at Parasol unit aims to consider Kounellis’s early works from the 1960s, 70s and 80s and his own response to them from today’s standpoint, which often culminates in a more recent and spontaneous work. This juxtaposition of works of art from the different decades should thus engender an arena for discussion. On show will be works, such as Untitled (Carboniera), 1967; Untitled (steel plate and braid),1969, on loan from Centre George Pompidou, Musée national d’art; Metamorphosis, 1984, and Untitled, 1977, an electric train moving on steel plates installed around one of the pillars of the Parasol unit gallery.

    Born in 1936 in Piraeus, Greece, Kounellis moved to Rome in 1956, where he still lives and works. In recent years, Kounellis has had numerous solo exhibitions internationally, including, among others, at Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin, 2007; National Centre for Contemporary Art, Moscow, 2011; Today Art Museum, Beijing, 2011; and Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens, 2012.

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  • Olaf Breuning: Human Nature / Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London

    Olaf Breuning: Human Nature exhibition Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London

    Olaf Breuning: Human Nature / Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London
    November 23, 2012 - January 12, 2013

    Private View: Thursday 22 November, 6-8 pm.

    Pippy Houldsworth Gallery is delighted to present a new commission for The Box by New York based Swiss artist Olaf Breuning. Breuning is known for his diverse and humorous explorations of the relationship between art, life and contemporary culture. Working across film, photography, sculpture and drawing, Breuning investigates the absurd and the surreal, creating perpetual punch lines and endless drama resulting from an instinctive relationship with language and materials. Here, Breuning creates a new installation for The Box, translating a new stick drawing into a precarious miniature metal sculpture. The Box is a micro project space consisting of a floating white cube set inside a black vertical opening. It is a unique architectural space through which the gallery facilitates new projects with important emerging and established artists. Previous commissions include Ai Weiwei, Martha Rosler, Ruth Claxton and Daniel Arsham.

    Breuning’s solo exhibitions include the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Chisenhale Gallery, London; Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich; Centre d’Art Contemporain, La Chapelle de Geneteil, Mayenne; Kunstmuseum, Lucerne; and the New Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Group shows include Museum of Contemporary Art, Kraków (MACAK); Saatchi Gallery, London; FLAG Art Foundation, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami; The Power Plant, Toronto; CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco; 54th Venice Biennale; MoMA PS1, New York; MoMA, New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and S.M.A.K, Gent, Belgium. His work is represented in collections including Fonds National d’Art Contemporain; Grafische Sammlung des Museums für Gestaltung, Zürich; Kunsthalle Hamburg; Louisiana Museum, Copenhagen; Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris; UBS Collection and Saatchi Collection, London.

    Above: Olaf Breuning, Smoke Bombs 2, 2011, C-print (1/6), 120 x 150 cm.

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