Matthew Harris & Tim Rowan / Erskine, Hall & Coe, London

Tim Rowan and Matthew Harris exhibition at Erskine Hall Coe Gallery London

Matthew Harris & Tim Rowan exhibition / Erskine, Hall & Coe, London
February 20 - March 20, 2013

An exhibition of works on paper by Matthew Harris and ceramics by Tim Rowan.

Matthew Harris’ work on paper has been shown in many group and solo exhibitions throughout the U.K, Europe, Japan and the U.S. As drawings they are made to be seen in their own right but also to act as starting points or ‘cartoons’ for larger works that are made using dyed and painted cloth.
Working primarily from things seen, the drawings recall, interpret and explore imagery, improvising around a given theme. Matthew Harris lives and works in Stroud, Gloucestershire.

Tim Rowan was born in New York City and grew up in Connecticut along the shore of Long Island Sound.  His art education began during college, receiving a BFA from The State University of New York at New Paltz before journeying to Japan for 2 years to apprentice with ceramic artist Ryuichi Kakurezaki. Upon his return he worked briefly in studios in Massachusetts and New York before receiving his MFA from The Pennsylvania State University.  In 2000 he established his kiln and studio deep in the woods of the Hudson Valley.

"The works in this exhibition have all been completed over the past two years. They are made, primarily, from native clay. This is direct from the earth and unprocessed as opposed to industrially manufactured clay bodies. The forms are slowly constructed from layers, built up over days and weeks then carved. They are fired for seven days and nights in a wood fuelled kiln. No glaze is applied; the surface textures and colours are the result of the interaction of the clay, fly-ash, coals and fire.

I am constantly building on previous work – just as individual pieces evolve in the process of making, the body of work as a whole does as well. Most of my work develops from the process of making, firing, and arranging. While I may have images in my head of some specific things I have seen, for instance the remnants of an old quarry derrick abandoned in the woods near my home, once I start making, new forms emerge. There is a search and discovery.

I am particularly drawn to objects in various states of decay – either through use over time such as tools or the effects of the “elements”. Everything is in a constant state of flux. These are merely markers of a particular time and place.

It is only when I am fully engaged in the making – that the forms present themselves. There is an intuitive process of discovery – of wondering, of noticing, of physically or intellectually feeling the forms. I work on many pieces at once to enable me to become lost in the process - freely moving from one form to another. There is a complete acceptance in the process. Faith. That is the guide. We work together, informing and reacting to each other.

There are four distinct series in this body of work. The sculptures are the most ambiguous and poetic for me. Drawn from a multitude of sources, industrial detritus, tools and abstracting the fragments of a vessel. The vessels are rooted in more of a pottery vernacular. They are there to nourish. We are comforted. We have a sense of place. The cups are individual intimate moments. Each one is a separate story. Held. Caressed. Nourishment. Life-affirming. The boxes may be urns. Shelters. Forced to touch in order to experience the inside. Containment. Security. Protect me. What is revealed?

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SPECIAL FEATURE: Romanian Contemporary Ceramics

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SPECIAL FEATURE: Romanian Contemporary Ceramics
Written review of Romanian contemporary ceramics through interviews with internationally-renowned and emerging Romanian artists.

In December 2011 we have witnessed the rebirth of Romanian contemporary ceramics through the opening of Galateea Gallery, Bucharest, the first gallery in Romania that promotes contemporary ceramics. The exhibition was titled “Ceramic rendez-vous”, poiting out the fact that it brought together fourteen artists from all over the country: Arina Ailincăi, Bianca Boeroiu, Cristina Bolborea, Adela Bonaţ, Vasile Cercel, Gherghina Costea, Georgiana Cozma, Marta Jakobovits, Romana Mateiaş, Aniela Ovadiuc, Monika Pădureţ, Cristina Popescu Russu, Ioana Şetran and Simona Tănăsescu.

With just two days ahead of the opening day of “Ceramic rendez-vous”, in December the 9th, 2011, Ceramics Now organized the opening day of the first Ceramics Now Exhibition in the city of Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The exhibition marked the launch of the magazine by exhibiting works of fifteen artists from eight countries. The third edition of Ceramics Now Exhibition is being held at Galateea Gallery, Bucharest, between 8-26th of November 2012, and presents the works of 22 world renowned contemporary ceramic artists, including three Romanian artists.

ROMANIAN CERAMIC ARTISTS - Read all the interviews:
Arina Ailincăi - by Vasi Hîrdo
Marta Jakobovits - by Ileana Surducan and Alexandra Mureşan
Romana Cucu Mateiaş - by Andra Baban
Aniela Ovadiuc - by Vasi Hîrdo
Oriana Pelladi - by Vasi Hîrdo
Eugenia Pop - by Alexandra Mureşan and Vasi Hîrdo
Cristina Popescu Russu - by Alexandra Mureşan
Bogdan Teodorescu - by Vasi Hîrdo

The feature is an ongoing project developed by Ceramics Now Association in collaboration with the Romanian Fine Arts Union, the University of Arts and Design Cluj-Napoca and the National University of Arts Bucharest.

Above: Oriana Pelladi, Emptiness, 2007, Ceramics, Video projection.

Ryan Blackwell

Ryan Blackwell Ceramics, Featured on Ceramics Now Magazine - Contemporary ceramics

Ryan Blackwell's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

Ryan Blackwell was born and raised in Indiana — receiving a BA in Studio Art from DePauw University in 2009. Expecting to graduate from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth in the spring of 2013 with an MFA, Ryan intends to move to Brooklyn and continue his journey as an emerging artist.

“My practice is rooted in material investigation. I find my work in a consistent state of flux. Processes change and evolve, imagery comes and goes. This minute I’m steeped in symbolism, say, through the repetition of thousands of dustpans, while the other I’m firmly rooted in geometric abstraction.

My fluid framework reflects my experience of American culture—a place where I navigate free choice and inherent socio-political and economic constraints. Through symbols and materials of domesticity my works find some continuity. It is my intention to create works that, in relation to each other, seem as dichotomous as they are connected. Although materials and processes may seem disparate, they find connection through aesthetics and systematic repetition. It is through a controlled failure of my materials and systems that I find consistency. But of course, inconsistency is always present.” Ryan Blackwell

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Romana Cucu Mateias - Artist of the month, November 2012

Interview by Andra Baban for Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two

As a contemporary artist with extensive knowledge in the field of ceramics, can you share with us a significant experience for your career?

There is no doubt that growing up in a family of artists had a major influence on my life and artistic career. The chance to develop myself in an artistic environment, to be in contact with different genres of art, cultivated my taste for diversity. As a defining experience, I can say that the time spent in the ceramics studio during high school was the most interesting for me. In that period, the studio was an experimentation lab and I was encouraged by my teacher, Judita Crăciun, to discover new things, and so I gathered knowledge that further helped me build my artistic identity. A similar stage was during doctoral studies when I had the opportunity to reshape and enrich my knowledge and vision regarding ceramic art.

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13 Ways of Looking at “Natural Great Piece” – Meditations on a performance in clay by Cybele Rowe and Lauren Ari

By Daniel Fleischmann

1. “Natural Great Piece” is an intricate, intimate, communal performance in the medium of clay. Like a dance or a concert, it is more overtly bound to time than most sculptural artwork, and it ends dissolved into the past.

2. Cybele Rowe and Lauren Ari make a large and detailed clay sculpture. It emerges from an improvisational score fed by their combined 60 years of art making experience. Passersby are invited to create self-portraits in clay to be incorporated into the artwork. Its surfaces become covered with these figures, which are painted with underglaze.

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Virginie Besengez - Spotlight, November 2012

SPOTLIGHT, November 2012: Virginie Besengez

Virginie Besengez Contemporary Ceramics - Featured on Ceramics Now Magazine

Interview by Vasi Hîrdo for Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two

Your body of work consists in reinterpretations in stoneware and porcelain of everyday objects. What sparked your interest for ceramics?

Firstly, an attraction toward the household objects led me to ceramic. I am deeply fascinated by clay and the gesture of the hand cupping the bowl.
Beyond the objects, my interest for this art was aroused by a strong link with the origin of humankind, the ancestral tradition of making household objects out of that universal and natural clay. Finally, meeting with ceramists and contemplating their work was a strong incentive to become part of that story.

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Oriana Pelladi - Romanian ceramic artist, November 2012

ROMANIAN CONTEMPORARY CERAMICS, November 2012: Oriana Pelladi

Oriana Pelladi Ceramics - Romanian contemporary ceramics featured on Ceramics Now Magazine

Interview by Vasi Hîrdo for Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two
Translation by Anca Sânpetrean

You are a young ceramist who had started her artistic endeavor early on, during college. How did you discover the passion for ceramics?

I guess it was while working. From one work to another you get new ideas; you get excited, you make things. I remember that at the beginning, in high school, I was fascinated to discover how a crude glaze that was a washy orange became dark green after the firing. When you are applying glazes, a significant part of the process is a mental/ imaginative one. While you are mixing and combining them, you need to imagine their true colors, revealed by the firing process.

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Ryan Blackwell: Untitled (Red Rectangle), details, 2012, Table Top, Clay, Oil, Acrylic, Curtain Wire, 41 x 28 x 2 in.

Ryan Blackwell: Raccoon Skulls with Human Incisor Implants, 2011, Ceramic, Gold Luster, Glaze, Single Skull - 4 x 3 x 2 in.

Ceramics Now Magazine has some treats for you! Our new package for digital subscriptions + Digital Issue One for FREE. Check our offers below.
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Digital Issue One - Ceramics Now MagazineGET IT FOR FREE or name a fair price.

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Digital Issue Two (Pre-Order) - Ceramics Now Magazine

Digital Issue Two - Ceramics Now Magazine (to be published in December - available for pre-order), is our second magnificent printed issue, this time made with more care and attention to detail. This issue sees the inauguration of our new Reviews category.
What you get: Two beautiful .PDF and .EPUB files for your PC (Windows), Mac, iPad or iPhone, delivered in December.+ Digital Issue One as a gift, delivered to your email right after you pay. The links are provided by WeTransfer.Read more about Ceramics Now / Ceramic artists listFollow us on Facebook and Twitter & subscribe to our free monthly newsletter. Contact: office@ceramicsnow.org

Ceramics Now Magazine has some treats for you! Our new package for digital subscriptions + Digital Issue One for FREE. Check our offers below.

Digital Subscription (10 issues) - Ceramics Now Magazine

Digital Subscription - Ceramics Now Magazine: 10 Digital Issues per year! + Digital Issue One as a gift, delivered right after you pay (.PDF and .EPUB files for PC, Windows, Mac, iPad, iPhone). The next one will be delivered in December to your email address.

What’s in a New Digital Issue:
~ 50 pages, interviews, reviews, exhibition releases, images, artist profiles, crisp contemporary design.

Digital Issue One - Ceramics Now Magazine
GET IT FOR FREE or name a fair price.

Digital Issue One - Ceramics Now Magazine, is the first issue of our beloved magazine, featuring over forty contemporary ceramic artists in exactly 100 pages. Get it just like that or you can think of a sum to pay for it (yes, there is a maximum of $1000, so please don’t magnify all the thing).

What you get: Two beautiful .PDF and .EPUB files for your PC (Windows), Mac, iPad or iPhone. The link is provided by WeTransfer.

Digital Issue Two (Pre-Order) - Ceramics Now Magazine

Digital Issue Two - Ceramics Now Magazine (to be published in December - available for pre-order), is our second magnificent printed issue, this time made with more care and attention to detail. This issue sees the inauguration of our new Reviews category.

What you get: Two beautiful .PDF and .EPUB files for your PC (Windows), Mac, iPad or iPhone, delivered in December.
+ Digital Issue One as a gift, delivered to your email right after you pay. The links are provided by WeTransfer.

Read more about Ceramics Now / Ceramic artists list
Follow us on Facebook and Twitter & subscribe to our free monthly newsletter. Contact: office@ceramicsnow.org

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Ceramics Now Magazine website - contemporary ceramics magazine

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We are proud to have collaborated with almost 100 featured artists at 60+ interviews and with 50+ partners at over 100 exhibitions and events.

How about the magazine?

Ceramics Now Magazine is published 10 times per year in digital format, and 2 times per year in printed format. The majority of our readership consists in educated individuals aged between 27-46 years old. Almost all of them are working in the arts field (self-employed artists, galleries, academic, small companies, etc.).

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SPECIAL FEATURE: Keiko Gallery - Japanese artists

Keiko Gallery - Special feature on Japanese artists - Ceramics Now Magazine

SPECIAL FEATURE: Keiko Gallery - Japanese artists, October 2011

In partnership with Keiko Gallery
Written review of “Keiko Gallery” through interviews with represented Japanese artists who work in ceramics, lacquer, textiles and jewelry.

Keiko Gallery is one of the most appreciated art galleries in the United States that focuses on Japanese art, from ceramics to the innovative lacquer art, textiles, jewelry and painting. Founded in 2003 in Boston, MA, the gallery organized numerous exhibitions of world-recognized Japanese artists.

The special feature includes interviews with 10 artists represented by Keiko Gallery, and lots of images with their works. We took this opportunity because we want to introduce the Japanese contemporary art and craft to a larger audience around the world. It is an excellent chance for our readers to learn more from Japanese artists, to see how they think and how they imagine their works.

KEIKO GALLERY - JAPANESE ARTISTS
View images / Read all the interviews:
Niisato Akio, Ceramics - View his works
Kawabata Kentaro, Ceramics - View his works
Takeuchi Kouzo, Ceramics - View his works
Hayashi Shigeki, Ceramics - View his works
Tanoue Shinya, Ceramics - View his works
Fujita Toshiaki, Lacquer art - View his works
Murata Yoshihiko, Lacquer art - View his works
Jorie Johnson, Textiles - View her works
Takeda Asayo, Textiles - View her works
Mariko Husain, Jewelry - View her works

The feature was presented on Ceramics Now in October 2011, and was published in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue One. Keiko Gallery has now closed its physical space in Boston and it is relocating all the activity online. The new email address is keikogallery@gmail.com

Above: Kentaro Kawabata, SOOS: Cao-Col, 2012, Porcelain, Silver, 25 x 18 x 40 cm.

SPECIAL FEATURE: Overthrown: Clay Without Limits (Denver Art Museum)

Overthrown: Clay Without Limits special feature for The Denver Art Museum - Ceramics Now

SPECIAL FEATURE: Overthrown: Clay Without Limits, July 2011

In partnership with The Denver Art Museum
Written review of “Overthrown: Clay Without Limits” exhibition at The Denver Art Museum through interviews with exhibiting artists and the curator.

The twenty-five artists in Overthrown: Clay Without Limits took on adventurous challenges to make the works in this exhibition. Most were made especially for Overthrown and many are in direct dialogue with our dynamic Daniel Libeskind-designed architecture; they move beyond the pedestal to the wall, the floor, and even the ceiling. A few extend beyond the Anschutz Gallery, across the entire museum complex. They break boundaries that are physical, technological, conceptual, and spatial.

Working in all scales, from architecturally expansive to almost impossibly small, the artists in Overthrown employ twenty-first-century technology hand-in-hand with standard modeling and molding techniques. They use digital cameras, computers, laser cutters, 3-D printers, and computer-controlled mills along with more traditional tools.

Some push the forms of functional objects. Others push the limits of fragility. They take risks that draw on material chemistry and maverick kiln techniques. Some of their works include not only clay, but also found objects such as metal, plastic, and abandoned industrial materials. Overthrowing our expectations of ceramic art—its size, its context, its methods, and its meaning—these artists show us new ways of using this versatile and timeless material.

OVERTHROWN: CLAY WITHOUT LIMITS
View images / Read all the interviews:
Gwen F. Chanzit, Curator
Katie Caron and Martha Russo
John Roloff
Clare Twomey
Paul Sacaridiz
Linda Sormin
Del Harrow
Mia Mulvey
Benjamin DeMott

The feature was presented on Ceramics Now in July 2011, and was published in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue One. The “Overthrown: Clay Without Limits" exhibition was on view at The Denver Art Museum June 11 through September 18, 2011.

Above: Linda Sormin, Mine (i hear him unclip me / blood runs cold), 2010–11. Glazed ceramic; souvenir kitsch; and studio remnants from Tim Berg, Gerit Grimm, Nathan Craven, Robyn Gray, and Ted Yoon. Photo by Jeff Wells.