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ceramic artists

CLASS OF 2013 / The National Centre for Craft & Design, Sleaford, UK

CLASS OF 2013 / The National Centre for Craft and Design, Sleaford, UK
November 22, 2013 - January 19, 2014

Each year,The National Centre for Craft and Design in Sleaford, Lincolnshire, UK selects work by the very best of the current year’s graduates from art colleges and universities all over the UK, and gives them the opportunity of exhibitingat the NCCD.

This year’s show explores the theme of function in objects. A range of high quality, visually striking artworks created by 18 specially selected graduates are on display. They demonstrate a diverse range of skills from fashion and jewellery to ceramics and automata.

Class of 2013 will be open to the public until Sunday 19 January 2014 everyday excluding Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Years Day from 10am to 5pm (3pm Christmas Eve).

Ceramicists exhibiting in Class of 2013:

Luke Bishop Ceramics

Luke Bishop, Rongorongo: Forgotten Function 5, 2013, Porcelain and stoneware with latex additions, maximum H46 cm. Photo by Scott Murray.

Luke Bishop
HE Diploma in Fine and Applied Arts in Ceramics
CityLit / London Metropolitan University

Rongorongo; Forgotten Function is an exploration rooted in the language of function where both memory and meaning are lost. False lids, multiple spouts (some obstructed, some fixed, others detachable), curiously and illogically-placed holes and tubes intentionally disturb the recognized and accepted grammar and syntax of function, causing the viewer and potential user to experience a disruption in the affordance towards the object.

In much the same way that an object excavated from the archaeological record only reveals to us a portion of its story, the meaning and uses of these vessels can never be completely recovered and known. Because the link between craft and everyday use has been permitted to slowly slip away from our collective experience, we are left with what we can only interpret but never fully explain. Function is forgotten.

Luke’s work seeks to invite the viewer to wonder at these curious vessels, and to provoke us to awaken to the process of cultural richness being lost. Its creative corollary, however, is that such richness can endure when care is taken to preserve meaning, ritual, skill and knowledge?

Zoe Clare Ceramics

Zoe Clare, Invading Forms #4, #5, #6, #7, 2013, Porcelain, 56x61 / 34x48 / 17x30 / 30x60 cm. Photo by Scott Murray.

Zoe Clare
BA (Hons) Ceramic Design
Central Saint Martins - University of Arts London

Zoe is an artist who works predominantly with ceramic. She creates sculptures that are visually absorbing, rich in layers, texture and integral repetitive patterns.
Zoe is influenced by the natural world around her and the discoveries made during her travels. The natural world, often overlooked, provides her with rich visual resources, which she then interprets and uses as a vessel to convey commentary and observations.

The ‘Invading Forms’ series explores the effects and conservational issues of invasive, non-native plants and their effects on the bio diversity of South Africa’s endangered environment. The sculptures are a metaphor for the conservational issues and endangered biodiversity we are facing today.

The sculptures, created in porcelain, take on the aggressive character of the invasive plants and become an invading form, growing organically and intrusively, absorbing anything and everything that is in its path.
These structural forms are concerned with internal and external spaces and holds remnants of the extinct plants it has devoured inside for spectators to see. Sections of the invading forms are open, allowing the insides to be examined. Within are surprising textures and glazes depicting the exotic nature of the diminishing South African fauna and flora.

Jade Crompton Ceramics

Jade Crompton, Bubble vases, Ceramics, slip cast, semi porcelain, Pieces between 23x24 cm. Photo by John James Clare.

Jade Crompton
BA (Hons) Design
Liverpool Hope University

Combining traditional plaster mould making techniques with the modern techniques of 3D design, Jade uses prototypes and digital model making to create unique moulds for slip casting.
Jade enjoys taking natural forms and applying structure and pattern using digital software, giving an organic and manmade appearance to her work. Overall her work is intended to be both aesthetically pleasing and functional.

Her current work focuses on casting plaster moulds from 3D printed models and layering laser cut pieces of perspex, this process allows Jade to produce more detailed and precise designs. The works are inspired by the layers found in natural formations such as lava, rock and ice.

Instead of using glazes or coloured slips which Jade finds too unpredictable, she uses airbrushed layers of under glaze which leaves a even matte coverage. She also adds a layer of clear glaze to the inside of her pieces which renders them waterproof.

Ruth Harrison Ceramics

Ruth Harrison (Porcelain, 2013, Photos by Scott Murray)
Green Gradiant Strip / Red Gradiant Strip, 200x95 mm.
Blue Disk with Orange Inlay / Yellow Disk with Blue Inlay / Green Disk with Red Inlay, 130x95 mm.

Ruth Harrison
BA (Hons) Ceramics
Plymouth College of Arts

Ruth Harrison uses porcelain to create sculptural forms using repeated elements. She is interested in symmetry and the idea of taking one shape and multiplying it many times over or around a cylinder. Her work evokes the childhood memory of running a hand or stick along a fence.

Ruth chooses to use porcelain due to its white body when fired to 1260°c. Porcelain also works very well with coloured stain which she uses for some of her collections.
Ruth draws the attention of the viewer to a section or strip of the finished piece using colour, texture or pattern which is added to the piece as it is being made. Each disk is hand cut using a cookie cutter from 3mm thick slabs of porcelain which are then cut in half, sponged, scored, slipped and attached to a slip-cast cylinder.

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  • Bertozzi & Casoni: Regeneration / All Visual Arts, London

    Bertozzi Casoni Regeneration exhibition, All Visual Arts, London

    Bertozzi & Casoni: Regeneration / All Visual Arts, London
    October 13 - November 10, 2012

    Private view: October 12, 7-9 pm.

    All Visual Arts are proud to present Regeneration, a unique installation from Italian artists Bertozzi & Casoni. The artists are acclaimed for their delicate depictions of a culture in decay, deftly rendered in fragile ceramic clay. Their latest work Regeneration queries the hierarchy of aesthetics, revealing the beauty in the neglected and discarded ephemera of our seamless culture. The pieces compel the viewer to confront the visceral decay of contemporary society, to expose the cracks between the artifice of the world we are presented with and to explore what lies within these fissures. With this imaginative approach to their practice, Bertozzi and Casoni align the traditional with the experimental, and allow us to construct our own narrative around their evocative scenes.

    Bertozzi and Casoni manipulate the indistinction between the real and the simulacrum in their work, an obsession for detail which evokes the Decadent taste for imitation and crafted artifice as superior to the natural. In fabricating these visually and emotionally compelling still-lifes, the artists engage the viewer in deeper themes of impermanence and mortality. Through rendering the abject and overlooked in such exquisite detail, Bertozzi and Casoni signal the return of the repressed, the avoidance of our own mortality. In one piece in which the memento mori is explicitly rendered, an ox skull is dominated by a vivid monitor lizard, symbolic of both death and rebirth in its habitat across Asia and Australia. In the antonymously titled DisGRACE, vibrant blooms sprout from the polluted detritus of a decadent and avaricious society, a scene of nature triumphing over the excesses of hyper-capitalism.

    Regeneration contemplates the possibility of change through rebirth, rediscovery and reappropriation, manipulating earth into elegant and fragile structures. In one piece, a cluster of butterflies flock to raise the severed head of a deer from an ornamental platter, recalling the Renaissance representations of John the Baptist or Holofernes. In a similar echo of classical scenes, and dominating the Regeneration is the serene image of a silverback gorilla resting in the Buddhist lotus position on a bed of discarded mattresses. A roe deer lies prone across its body, while wrens and goldcrests commune around the pair. The piece is an evocation of symbolic power, from the visceral confrontation of our Darwinian descendent dying out in front of our eyes, to the shift between the viewer and sculpture, object and subject as we find ourselves caught in the compassionate gaze of the animals. Our own mortality is inscribed in the tableaux where urban structures, religion and the animal world collide to reveal the grace in disgrace which Bertozzi and Casoni seek to capture.

    It seems appropriate that the duo push their material to its limits and question the possibility of representation in their work at every turn. Their liberal accumulation and compilation of cultural references is evident in the playful amalgamation of objects in a work where a swordfish’s head juts from a guitar case; the shapes tessellating the natural with the cultural. Their curiosity and playful approach to objects creates a process of continual experimentation and discovery, freeing themselves from convention and the stereotypes of the ornamental and domestic associated with the ceramic medium, and producing unexpected moments of pathos and humour through their synthesis of past and present, nature and artifice. The artists subvert the established rules about the perception of applied arts through inverting the symbolic power of their traditional medium, exceeding the inherent conservativism of ceramics to sculpt fantastic and grotesque scenes that liberate both the artist and viewer’s imagination.

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  • Contemporary Clay Invitational / j fergeson gallery, Farmville, VA

    Contemporaryc eramics exhibition - Contemporary Clay Invitational exhibition j fergeson gallery, Farmville

    Contemporary Clay Invitational / j fergeson gallery, Farmville, VA
    October 5 - December 15, 2012

    Opening Reception: Saturday, October 13, 5:00 pm.

    The latest show at the j fergeson gallery in Farmville, VA, explores the diverse possibilities of what can be done with clay. This show, the gallery’s largest of the year, features works from 30 national artists. Here one will find both sculptural and functional pieces, but perhaps most interesting is the way the artists have settled somewhere in between.

    The show is an extraordinary collection of ceramic work by artists working at the top of their field. Co-curators Andréa Keys Connell, lead professor in clay at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Adam Paulek, lead professor in clay at Longwood University, chose the artists for their commitment to fine craft, progressive thought, sensitivity to material and humor.

    Artist A. Blair Clemo, inspired by the ornate history of European Decorative Arts, creates vessels that are functional, but also ridiculously opulent, as if ready to serve royalty. John Oliver Lewis presents two sculptures inspired equally by architecture, natural land formations, cartoons, and candy - think Monument Valley out of salt water taffy. And then there’s Darrin Ekern’s “potasaurus”: a sculpture of a T-Rex in a studio throwing a pot.

    Featured artists:
    A. Blair Clemo, Kurt Anderson, Tom Bartel, Jason Hackett, Hiroe Hanazono, Mike Jabbur, Bethany Krull, John Oliver Lewis, Richard Nickel, Nathan Prouty, Debbie Quick, Dave Smith, Mikey Walsh, Trent Berning, Kelly Berning, Jeff Campana, Sam Chung, David Eichelberger, Darrin Ekern, Misty Gamble, Meredith Host Kowalski, Nicole Aquillano, Frank Martin, Dan Molyneux, Chris Picket, Adrian Sandstrom, Amy Santafararo, Shawn Spangler, Kendra Sparks, Adero Willard.

    This variety of work isn’t often seen in small galleries, and the curators are excited to present it to an audience that may be unfamiliar with just how adventurous contemporary clay has become.

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  • Open call for submissions

    We’re opening submissions for all contemporary ceramic artists. If you submit your work to Ceramics Now, you could be featured on our website (as a featured artist), and in print, beginning Issue nr. 2 (March 2012). Contact us.

    Ceramics Now Magazine is a contemporary ceramic art magazine published in Romania. We feature exclusive interviews with world-renowned ceramic artists, high quality images with their works and news from the ceramic field. The first printed issue of Ceramics Now will be published next month (Winter 2011-2012), and will contain more than 40 interviews with ceramic artists.

    We think it’s an amazing opportunity for artists to be featured and to be promoted in Ceramics Now. We have a strong presence online and we are trying hard to enter the top contemporary ceramics magazines in the world.

    Read more about us and about Issue nr. 1.

    Subscribe to our monthly newsletter and like our Facebook page if you want to stay in touch with us.

  • Making or unmaking? The Contexts of Contemporary Ceramics - Conference in Bergen, Norway

    Making or unmaking? The Contexts of Contemporary Ceramics, Conference in Bergen, Norway

    The Contexts of Contemporary Ceramics - Conference
    27th - 29th of October 2011

    The opposition between studio and industrial ceramics that has had such a central place in the self-understanding of studio ceramists, no longer seems meaningful. A shift from production to reproduction has taken place. Images and patterns from different sources are appropriated and manipulated. Mass-produced objects, often characterized by disuse, disruption and damage, have come to be increasingly used as raw materials. The relationship between artist and artisan has also changed. The conference focuses on the way in which these changes influence contemporary making, and how they contribute to the unmaking of conventional understanding of ceramics and craft practices in general.

    SPEAKERS
    Glenn Adamson, Barnaby Barford, Marek Cecula, Nicole Cherubini, Mònica Gaspar, Tanya Harrod, Ben Highmore, Gitte Jungersen, Søren Kjørup,Carol McNicoll, Kevin Murrey, Andrew Livingstone, Michael Petry, Mike Press, Paul Scott, Ezra Shales, Richard Slee, Caroline Slotte, Linda Sormin, Hans Stofer, Clare Twomey, Jorunn Veiteberg and Anne Britt Ylvisåker.

    EXHIBITIONS
    West Norway Museum of Decorative Art: Thing Tang Trash. Upcycling in Contemporary Ceramics (curator: Heidi Bjørgan); Galleri Rom 8: Kjell Rylander; Hordaland Art Centre: Shot: Textiles and Photography (curator: Glenn Adamson); Galleri Format: The Red Room (curator: Heidi Bjørgan); Galleri Fisk; S12: Young and Loving.

    LOCATION
    Terminus Hall, Hotel Grand Terminus, Bergen, Norway.

    PROGRAM
    Thursday Oct 27, 10.00-18.00
    Workshop 1: History Lessons

    Glenn Adamson (USA/UK): Ten easy pieces: Postmodernism and the found object
    Carol McNicoll (UK): Domestic collage
    Richard Slee (UK): The way he is sourcing things
    Ezra Shales (USA): The museum as medium-specific muse
    Clare Twomey: Manufactured not made
    Caroline Slotte (FI): Long exposure
    Paul Scott (UK): Willows, windmills and wild roses. Recycling and remediation
    Tanya Harrod (UK): Memory work: Craft and art in post-industrial Europe

    Exhibitions: Thing Tang Trash. Upcycling in Contemporary Ceramics, Art Museums Bergen/Permanenten (19-21)

    Friday Oct 28, 9-17
    Workshop 2: Object Lessons

    Ben Highmore (UK): The poetics of made things
    Hans Stofer (CH/UK): ’Biting into a cherry does not prepare you for the stone’
    Mònica Gaspar (ES/CH): Craft in its gaseous state: An exhibition report
    Andrew Livingstone: The ceramic regurgitant: sustainability and the readymade
    Barnaby Barford (UK): Appropriation, narrative and humour
    Gitte Jungersen (DK): Place to be lost, materiality and meaning in my work
    Jorunn Veiteberg (NO): The Duchamp effect in ceramics

    Exhibition openings: Kjell Rylander Rom 8; B.T.2011, Galleri Format (curator: Heidi Bjørgan); Textiles and Photography, Hordaland Art Center (curator: Glenn Adamson); Young and Loving, Gallery S12.

    Saturday, Oct 29
    Workshop 3: Institutional Lessons

    Michael Petry (UK): The art of not making: The new artist/artisan relationship
    Marek Cecula (PL): Industrial interventions
    Anne Britt Ylvisåker (NO): The museum: New potentials
    Linda Sormin (CA/USA): Chinese Take-out
    Kevin Murrey (AU): The new do-it-themselves ceramics: throwing out the baby with the mud?
    Mike Press (UK): Handmade knowledge. The new challenge for craft.
    Søren Kjørup (DK): A philosophical perspective: A new history, a new order.

    19.00 Dinner, Grand selskapslokaler.

    Reservations

    The research conference is organized by K-verdi (www.k-verdi.no) at Bergen National Academy of the Arts, in collaboration with Art Museums of Bergen. Supported by the Norwegian Research Council, Bergen National Academy of the Arts, Bergen kommune, Hordaland Fylkeskommune and Norske Kunsthåndverkere.

  • » Overthrown: Clay Without Limits, on view until September 18

    The Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition at the Denver Art Museum is on view until September 18, 2011.

    "The scale of the space has pushed all the artists to think big, both physically and conceptually. The exhibition, technically demonstrates the inventive use of such an ancient material, while raising contemporary issues. The works in the exhibition challenge traditional notions of “objectness”, providing a depth of content, and creating a diverse dialogue." Katie Caron

    Location: Anschutz Gallery, Level Two, Hamilton Building / Denver Art Museum

    → View images from the exhibition (in High Quality) - /Overthrown
    → Read interviews we’ve made with some of the exhibiting artists -  /Overthrown_Interviews

    Interview with Gwen F. Chanzit - The curator of the exhibition.
    Interview with Katie Caron and Martha Russo
    Interview with John Roloff
    Interview with Clare Twomey
    Interview with Paul Sacaridiz
    Interview with Linda Sormin
    Interview with Del Harrow
    Interview with Mia Mulvey
    Interview with Benjamin DeMott

    * The Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition will have an extended feature in the first printed issue of Ceramics Now Magazine (November 2011).

  • Overthrown: Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis (detail), 2010–11. Porcelain, paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted tools, steel and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents, electrical cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper, beeswax. #2

  • » Like Ceramics Now Magazine on Facebook

    Our Facebook (and Twitter) fans already have access to the June-July 2011 edition of our monthly newsletter. Like us on Facebook / Twitter or wait until tomorrow, when we will make the interviews available for our visitors!

    The newsletter features interviews with ceramic artists Roxanne Jackson as Artist of the month, Liza Riddle as Recognized artist, Jim Kraft - Ceramic Technique, Chang Hyun Bang as New artist, plus The Young Artists’ Collective for our Tumblr Community interviews.

    Also, you’ll get to read a preview of the interview with Gwen F. Chanzit, Curator of Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition at the Denver Art Museum.

    The special feature for The Denver Art Museum will cover more interviews with artists exhibiting at the Overthrown exhibition, which is on view June 11 through September 18, 2011. Subscribe here and wait until July for the special edition of our newsletter.

  • » The June/July edition of our newsletter is almost done

    The June/July edition of our monthly newsletter is almost done! This edition will feature interviews with Roxanne Jackson as Artist of the month, Liza Riddle as Recognized Artist, Jim Kraft - Ceramic Technique, plus the New Artist (in each edition we’re proposing a new ceramic artist).

    You’ll also receive a preview of the next month special newsletter featuring The Denver Art Museum's Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition, which includes an interview with the curator Gwen F. Chanzit.

    Plus this edition’s Tumblr Community feature: The Young Artists’ Collective.

    Subscribe here. It’s free!

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    Newsletters archive: Nr. 1, April 2011 // Nr. 2, May 2011

  • Debbie Quick

    Debbie Quick's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    “I am a storyteller. Or at least I’ve wanted to be one for as long as I can remember; yet, the verbal telling of situations is not how my mind works. Instead, I physically construct my stories which speak of emotional interactions and reactions experienced during intense social exchanges. Just as social interactions are layered, having a number of interpretations, visual information leads to a multitude of possible understandings as well.  This is why the idiom “A picture is worth a thousand words” describes how I choose to create narratives. Having more than one interpretation of an experience is why I desire to pack multilayered thoughts into every thing I make. Through exploring these concerns I attempt to communicate the numerous nuances of emotion weathered during awkward social exchanges.

    I watch. I love to watch. I draw inspiration from the watching. I collect awkward exchanges between people and then sculpt them into stories. My narratives visually speak of uncomfortable social interactions and the intensity of feeling born out of them. The pieces I build depict the slippery quality of emotional intelligence and how it seems to elude explanation. Since there is often more than one side to a story and no singular truth to a situation, my pieces are stuck at the point of experiencing and contemplating uncomfortable and irresolvable situations. I explore the pain and discomfort of social interactions through the visual narratives I make.” Debbie Quick

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  • » Don't forget to subscribe to our monthly newsletter

    Our second newsletter will be sent in just one week!

    It will feature interviews with ceramic artists Margrieta Jeltema, Carol Gouthro, Shane Porter, plus a new artist from The Netherlands. Photographer Jonathan Vanderweit from Denver, Colorado will also be interviewed for the newsletter.

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  • Grayson Perry

    Grayson Perry's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

    Grayson Perry (born in 1960) is an English artist, known mainly for his ceramic vases and cross-dressing. He works in several media. Perry’s vases have classical forms and are decorated in bright colours, depicting subjects at odds with their attractive appearance, e.g. child abuse and sado-masochism. There is a strong autobiographical element in his work, in which images of Perry as “Claire”, his female alter-ego, often appear. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 2003 for his ceramics, receiving the prize dressed as Claire.

    Perry’s work refers to several ceramic traditions, including Greek pottery and folk art. He has said, “I like the whole iconography of pottery. It hasn’t got any big pretensions to being great public works of art, and no matter how brash a statement I make, on a pot it will always have certain humility… For me the shape has to be classical invisible: then you’ve got a base that people can understand”. His vessels are made by coiling, a traditional method. Most have a complex surface employing many techniques, including “glazing, incision, embossing, and the use of photographic transfers”, which requires several firings. To some he adds sprigs, little relief sculptures stuck to the surface. The high degree of skill required by his ceramics and their complexity distances them from craft pottery. It has been said that these methods are not used for decorative effect but to give meaning. Perry challenges the idea, implicit in the craft tradition, that pottery is merely decorative or utilitarian and cannot express ideas.

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