Güliz Korkmaz Tirkeş: Flow Series, 2010-2013

My work in general may be considered as formed under the effect of an outer force. While this force may reveal itself as irregular linear textures on some forms, in others the body itself is bent or squeezed according to the strength and direction of this force. However, the force is not detrimental, but naturally welcomed by the forms.

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Hannah Wilke: Sculpture 1960s-’80s / Alison Jacques Gallery, London

Hannah Wilke: Sculpture 1960s-’80s at Alison Jacques Gallery, London

Hannah Wilke: Sculpture 1960s-’80s / Alison Jacques Gallery, London
April 24 - May 29, 2014

Alison Jacques is proud to present its fourth solo exhibition of the late American artist Hannah Wilke (1940 – 1993). For this show, the focus is on Wilke’s sculpture from her early terracotta works of the ‘60s through to the more richly coloured installations of the ‘80s. The show also encompasses the theme of her body as sculpture seen in performative photographs as well as drawings from the ‘60s and ‘70s which either refer to her sculptures or demonstrate a visceral physicality that feels completely in dialogue with her sculptural practice.

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Simon Fujiwara / Contemporary Art Society, London

Simon Fujiwara at Contemporary Art Society, London

Simon Fujiwara / Contemporary Art Society, London
January 29 - March 28, 2014

Simon Fujiwara’s Rebekkah was recently purchased for Leeds Art Gallery through the Contemporary Art Society Collections Committee. Established in 2012, the committee selects and buys works by early and mid-career artists to gift to regional museums across the UK.

Rebekkah is inspired by a 16 year old girl from Hackney, Rebekkah, who was one of the protagonists of the 2011 London Riots. Rebekkah was asked by Fujiwara to travel to China to take part in a unique social experiment, where her access to social media was restricted and she visited factories manufacturing the objects she aspired to own and took for granted (fashion clothing, mobile phones, flat-screen TVs). The trip culminated with a viewing of the Terracotta Army, after which Rebekkah was taken to a factory where casts were made of her body to be assembled into modern day versions of the warriors.

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Susanne Silvertant / Terra Delft Gallery, Delft, the Netherlands

Susanne Silvertant exhibition, Terra Delft Gallery

Susanne Silvertant / Terra Delft Gallery, Delft, the Netherlands
November 30 - December 31, 2013

Connection is one of the most important themes of Susanne Silvertant’s work. Art is a language for her. With her art she tries to communicate and show who she is. This vision is enhanced by scratching signs in some of her pieces. Signs refer to language that cannot be understood instantly. This is the most intense way of expressing herself.

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Arina Ailincai - Romanian ceramic artist, October 2012

ROMANIAN CONTEMPORARY CERAMICS, October 2012: Arina Ailincăi

Arina Ailincai - Romanian ceramic artist, Romanian contemporary ceramics special feature

Interview by Vasi Hîrdo for Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two
Translation by Anca Sânpetrean

What was your first contact with ceramics?

The first meeting with ceramic took place when I entered the university, as I decided to take the admission exam for the Ceramics Department. The reason for this option was the liberal reputation held by the Ceramics Department, mainly due to the young teachers of various formations, who were encouraging the free investigation subordinated to an “interdisciplinary” that at that time was quite attractive.

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Mary Fischer and Patricia Sannit / Obsidian Gallery, Tucson, Arizona, USA

Mary Fischer and Patricia Sannit exhibition at Obsidian Gallery, Tucson, Arizona

Mary Fischer and Patricia Sannit / Obsidian Gallery, Tucson, Arizona, USA
March 17 - May 12, 2012

Obsidian Gallery presents a two person exhibition of non-figurative ceramic sculpture by Mary Fischer and Patricia Sannit. The show runs from March 17th through May 12, 2012, with the Artist’s Reception on Saturday, March 24, 2012 from 6pm to 9pm.

The focus of Mary Fischer’s work is architecture, both in the wild and in books. The images “get jumbled” in Mary’s head and later sorted out by her hands.
The timelessness of indigenous architecture is an influence, as is the use of concrete by contemporary architects. Surface treatments and forms change over time as different structures capture her interest.

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Patricia Sannit received her BA in Ceramics, Art History and Norwegian from the University of Minnesota and her MFA from the California College of Arts. She now lives in Phoenix, Arizona. Sannit’s work is influenced by her experiences excavating in the Near East and Ethiopia. Sannit’s most recent project is a large-scale ceramic installation, Citadel, based on an archeological site in Iraq.
Patricia Sannit’s work draws from humanity’s relationship with both its natural and man-made surroundings. She uses both found and repurposed clay to refer to historical art forms as well as the stratigraphy of the Earth. “I am interested in the story of the earth, our species, and pots. History is manifest in the scarred and worn surface of our planet and in a pot well made and well used.”

Obsidian Gallery has presented the best in contemporary craft to Tucson residents and visitors for twenty-five years. There is an emphasis on the traditional craft media of clay, fiber, metal, glass and wood. Contemporary fine art, and works in mixed media complement the selection.

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Jean-François Fouilhoux / Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France

Jean-François Fouilhoux, stoneware sculpture exhibition Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France

Jean-François Fouilhoux, stoneware sculpture / Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France
17th March - 17th June 2012

Opening reception: Saturday, March 17th, 5.00pm

I love clay.
I’m always moved to see the mark made by my fingers in soil.
Clay remembers their lightest touch and retains the slightest motion transmitted to it.
The mildest inflection – or even hesitation – leaves its trace.
It is a recorder of emotions. Hasn’t a scientist said that given the right tools, one could hear the sounds generated in the studio when a pot is being thrown because they are etched into its surface, like the first recordings of voices on wax cylinders? This highly singular property of clay is all the richer because the firing sets these marks and preserves their traces.
Like the wall of a cave and pigment, or paper and pencil, clay engages with the hands and the body.
I write in the soil.
My pencil? A flexible blade that I bend at will. My medium? A wall of clay.
I sketch in space by drawing the blade through the wall and slicing into its thickness.
The line is a continuous one, just as with writing, and the volume takes form blindly, as imagined by the gesture.
The form is then composed of two interlocking elements, separated by a small gap.
We could say that each is a mould or an impression of the other, with a space that Marcel Duchamp defined as being ‘infra-thin’. They are born of the same gesture: the trace left by the motion of the flexible blade is all that ultimately interests me.
I then sacrifice one of the two parts, which I destroy to allow the impression of the gesture to appear.
Traces of energy, of tension… Like a calligrapher, I have meditated on the gesture before executing it. It is a sort of dance or ritual in which the movement is expansive, dynamic, continuous and without regrets.The goal is freeing up the sensitive impression, after a privileged moment, by emptying its material content and reducing it to a skin,
then bringing it to life as if suspended in the void… and simply capturing the energy of the gesture expressed in space…
This is yet another story of fullness and emptiness, which is recurrent in ceramics. It is also the story of celadon – translucent – another symbol for completeness and void: both matter and light.

Jean-François Fouilhoux

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Cindy Billingsley: Giraffes - Out of the ordinary, 2008, 25” x 28” x 22”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Giraffes - Out of the ordinary, 2008, 25” x 28” x 22”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Gorilla, 2008, 22” x 20” 21”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Gorilla, 2008, 22” x 20” 21”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Koala, 2007, 25” x 27”x 15”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Koala, 2007, 25” x 27”x 15”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Tapir, 2007, 15” 15” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Tapir, 2007, 15” 15” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Anteater and baby, 2009, 15” x 28” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Anteater and baby, 2009, 15” x 28” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Ceramic Sculpture during the age of Adolfo Wildt - MIC Faenza, Italy

Ceramic Sculpture during the age of Adolfo Wildt - International Museum of Ceramics Faenza, Italy

Ceramic Sculpture during the age of Adolfo Wildt - The International Museum of Ceramics in Faenza, Italy
29th January – 17th June 2012

Opening ceremony: 28th January at 5.30 p.m.
Event concurring the exhibition devoted to Adolfo Wildt at the Musei di San Domenico in Forlì

The exhibition “Adolfo Wildt. L’anima e le forme tra Michelangelo e Klimt” (28th January – 17th June 2012) curated by Paola Mola, Fernando Mazzocca and Antonio Paolucci, with the scientific coordination by Gianfranco Brunelli, at the Musei di san Domenico in Forlì, highlights the extraordinary creativity of one of the greatest master of the modern sculpture. Wildt (1868 – 1931) was a great artist, self-educated and talented who represented a disputed figure inside the national artistic world: he was venerated from persons who understood his geniality and detested from persons who considered his creations opposing the harmony of the shapes and too linked to the Nordic Decadentism.

The International Museum of Ceramics in Faenza, jointly working with the Fondazione Cassa dei Risparmi di Forlì manager of the event, proposes an exhibition “Ceramic Sculpture during the time of Adolfo Wildt” (28th January – 17th June 2012) curated by Claudia Casali, displayed inside the 20th century collection in order to emphasize the artists who had contacts and relations with Wildt, such as the scholars Fausto Melotti and Lucio Fontana, or others who shared the same extraordinary contemporary artistic experience such as Domenico Rambelli, Galileo Chini, Achille Calzi, Francesco Nonni, Domenico Baccarini, Arturo Martini and Duilio Cambellotti. In the same context the exhibition offers examples of apparent opposite artistic personalities represented by the Futurist movement concretized in the ceramic experience in Faenza (1928-29) and Albisola (from 1929 on).

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Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #9, alternative view, 2010. White stoneware, slab built, 31”H x23”W x 33”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #9, alternative view, 2010. White stoneware, slab built, 31”H x23”W x 33”L, Cone 9 Reduction