Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

ceramics


Alexandra Lerman: Immediate Release at Tina Kim Gallery, New York
May 1 - June 28, 2014

Courtesy artist and Tina Kim Gallery

> More exhibitions (gallery) / View the list of ceramic exhibitions


  • Michael Geertsen: Still Life, Still Lives at Jason Jacques Gallery, New York
    May 21 - June 21, 2014

    Courtesy the artist and Jason Jacques Inc.

    > More exhibitions (gallery) / View the ceramic exhibitions list


  • Kevork Cholakian: Artist’s Studio Chairs, 2012-2013

    Chairs are an essential part for our every day existence,they virtually go unnoticed. Yet how we use them tells us something about the person who uses them. By creating this series of artist’s chairs in clay I transform something otherwise mundane and challenge our preconception of the use of materials and prompt a closer look at the seemingly ordinary.


  • Tristan Stamm: Collections, 2014, Work in progress

    Originally a collection of 26 seedlings/penises, with the tallest being 29 inches and the smallest at 3 inches.

    I had a hard time finding a way to show this collection of seedlings/penises, and eventually found their space when surrounded by my other work.

    I am now working on finding their place in other environments while exploring the idea of collecting and obsessions.


  • Lucy Gresley: Vessels, 2014

    Vessels is a collection of work that explores the idea of vessels, both as containers and as metaphors for people and their emotions.  My artwork is often about thinking and reflecting – in this case, investigating the different meanings and connotations of vessels. For example, I am interested in the psychoanalytic idea of caregivers as emotional containers, who can hold and re-interpret strong feelings. I am also fascinated by alchemy and particularly the use of vessels in alchemy as sites of transformation.

    In making this work, I have become interested in vessels that cannot be used or that will not contain anything. I imagine that vessels can be like people – elegant, funny, self-contained, ineffectual, silly, detached or spilling their contents – and I have played with their form to reflect this. I enjoy mistakes and forms that are intentionally wrong – collapsing spouts and vases without openings. I am also attracted to the anthropomorphic qualities of pots and vases.

    I enjoy the freedom of working in clay, which I find a very direct and playful medium. I am also interested in the dialogue between these ceramic pieces and my collage work, which I can use to infer ideas and create narratives.


  • Güliz Korkmaz Tirkeş: Flow Series, 2010-2013

    My work in general may be considered as formed under the effect of an outer force. While this force may reveal itself as irregular linear textures on some forms, in others the body itself is bent or squeezed according to the strength and direction of this force. However, the force is not detrimental, but naturally welcomed by the forms.

    The flow series also appear as a result of the forces applied by large volumes. The effects of these volumes on these works are embraced with soft and smooth movements and can be traced on the form with a natural flow. As in my other works this also may be seen as traces of an outer force, but these traces are outcomes that are formed within a natural flow and are affirmed by the form. The final form stands upright with its pure, content energy shaped by this feeling of embrace.


  • Brett Freund: Bliss Point - The amount of an ingredient that optimizes palatability, 2013-2014

    This project is a exploration of repetition and balance while researching the aesthetic parameters of different materials. These recent vessels represent an indulgence in making with consideration to how choice creates form. My background is rooted in traditional pottery and it’s important to me for my work to best reflect the world that I feel is around me.


  • Michael Boroniec: Spatial Spirals, 2013

    What began with teapots and a single spiral, has evolved into a series of vases that vary in form, degree of expansion, and number of coils. Each vessel is wheel thrown then deconstructed. This process reveals aspects of the vase that most rarely encounter. Within the walls, maker’s marks become evident and contribute to the texture. The resultant ribbon effect, reminiscent of a wheel trimming, lends fragility, elegance, and motion to a medium generally perceived as hard and heavy. This emphasizes a resistance of gravity, allowing negative space to unravel and become part of the form. The result is a body of sculptural objects, resembling and born of functional vessels.


  • Seth Czaplewski: Onsite Sculpture, 2013-2014

    While researching North St. Louis I have uncovered a history of production and self-sufficiency pushed to the periphery, which today is so prevalent in American society that we barely notice. In the early 1800’s the area just North of downtown St. Louis was a communal farmland for residents. There was also a 15-acre plot along the Mississippi river open to residents to use as they wanted.  Both ideas were very progressive for their time and still are, although neither is still in place today. European immigrants once flocked to this area due to failed farming in their homeland. In the case of Henry Overstolz, originally from Germany, once in America his fortune changed when he opened grocery stores. Since then the rapid development of infrastructure has led to a society of convenience. And once again, like in Overstolz’ time of the mid 1800’s, people have fled, as the site cannot meet the needs of the people. My works are inspired by and situated on sites like these.

    With the agricultural and technological revolutions of the mid-twentieth century, skills were traded for convenience in the United States with the implementation of the assembly line, mechanization, and mass production. Skilled craftspeople traded their skills in to work in a factory. The factory did provide some benefits, but within a generation, previous skills were lost. As a result, people no longer know how to construct goods, arrange living space, or grow food needed to sustain life. In my work, I attempt to understand and teach myself all three skills on a small scale in relation to the sites former production. The chain of passed-down knowledge has been broken and a relearning of these skills is essential to understand where we stand today.

    How people live in relation to agriculture throughout recent history is influential to my work. As society is becoming increasingly disconnected from food production we are losing the most basic and necessary skills. These works re-incorporate food production in direct proximity to dwelling, as it is a necessary step backwards to move forwards. Today the average distance it takes food to get to our homes in the U.S. is 1500 to 2500 miles. Although convenient, “progress  is sometimes deceiving and makes us more vulnerable than we once were.  Likewise my structures are precarious, permanently placed outdoors, and vulnerable to the whim of the passerby.

    I rapidly construct these minature dwellings in relation to food production on a scale reminiscent of the anthropological diorama. They are made out of necessity and use past fragments of mass production related to site as material in creating non-linear historically based sculptural markers. I draw upon past people, industry, patterns, and site uses in the creation of new fragments that anticipate, dedicate, and monumentalize the site. Once constructed, the physical objects are situated outdoors entering the strata. They are then documented digitally as the primary ‘art object’.

    Infrastructural changes since the electrification and gassing up of the United States have been influential to my work. In the making of industry, we often lose culture and community, and there has been a considerable amount of unmaking. This unmaking is not isolated to North St. Louis where I currently work. As my needs change and I move to new locations, my work will respond to local histories.

  • Month in Review: May 2014

    Month in Review, May 2014 at Ceramics Now Magazine

    Hello friends. Welcome to Month in Review, a summary of the last month of activity here at Ceramics Now.
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    Exhibitions galleries
    Hannah Wilke: Sculpture 1960s-’80s at Alison Jacques Gallery, London
    Elements in Harmony: Contemporary Japanese ceramics at Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

    Exhibitions
    Michael Geertsen: Still Life, Still Lives / Jason Jacques Gallery, New York
    Simon Carroll / Corvi-Mora Gallery, London
    Alexandra Lerman: Immediate Release / Tina Kim Gallery, New York
    Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics / Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh
    Dual Natures in Ceramics: Eight Contemporary Artists from Korea / SFO Museum, San Francisco
    Jun Kaneko: A Stage for a Shared Dream / Locks Gallery, Philadelphia
    Nathan Lynch: Another High / Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco
    Emma Woffenden: Falling Hard / Marsden Woo Gallery, London
    SCORES: Fujita, Cole & Lopez / Cross MacKenzie Gallery, Washington DC
    Ewen Henderson / Erskine, Hall & Coe, London
    Edmund de Waal: Atmosphere / Turner Contemporary, Margate, Kent
    State of Flux / An Talla Solais, Ullapool, Scotland
    Anna Maria Maiolino. Between Senses / Hauser & Wirth, New York
    Annabeth Rosen / Ventana244, Brooklyn
    Marit Tingleff and Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl: X–Scapes / Copenhagen Ceramics
    Hannah Wilke: Sculpture 1960s-’80s / Alison Jacques Gallery, London
    InCiteful Clay / Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock, USA
    Sara Radstone / Marsden Woo Gallery, London
    Beverly Mayeri / Duane Reed Gallery, Saint Louis

    Calls for applications and news
    Contemporary Ceramics Festival TseGlyna 2014, Kiev, Ukraine
    2nd International Ceramic Art Symposium LANDescape, Daugavpils, Latvia

  • Month in Review: January 2014

    Month in Review, January 2014 at Ceramics Now Contemporary ceramics

    Hello friends. Welcome to Month in Review, a summary of the last month of activity here at Ceramics Now.
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    We offer limited sponsorship opportunities for those who want to connect with our global readership of professional artists and ceramic art enthusiasts.

    Subscribe to Ceramics Now Magazine, the international bi-annual journal that promotes critical discussion about contemporary ceramics through interviews, artist projects and reviews.

    Featured artists
    Tim Rowan - View works
    Graciela Olio - View works

    Exhibition galleries
    Gareth Mason: More is more at Jason Jacques Gallery, New York
    David Hicks: Nucleus at Cross MacKenzie Gallery, Washington DC
    Living Glass at Musée de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains, Lausanne, Switzerland
    Arlene Shechet: Meissen Recast at RISD Museum, Providence, USA
    Betül Demir Karakaya & Gökçe Özer: 1+1 at Terakki Foundation Art Gallery, Istanbul

    Exhibitions
    Turn, Weave, Fire, and Fold: Vessels from the Forrest L. Merrill Collection / SFO Museum, San Francisco
    Clara Garesio: Desired lands / Linee Contemporanee, Salerno, Italy
    Earthen Bodies: Ceramics as Sculptural Form / Slocumb Galleries, Johnson City, Tennessee
    Being Here & Being Thus. Sculpture, Object & Stage / Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt
    Arlene Shechet: Meissen Recast / RISD Museum, Providence, USA
    David Hicks: Nucleus / Cross MacKenzie Gallery, Washington DC
    Gareth Mason: More is more / Jason Jacques Gallery, New York
    Betül Demir Karakaya & Gökçe Özer: 1+1 / Terakki Foundation Art Gallery, Istanbul
    Jos Devriendt: Day & Night / Pierre Marie Giraud, Bruxelles
    Living Glass / Musée de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains, Lausanne, Switzerland
    By Degrees ceramics exhibition / L5-23 Unit Gallery, Jockey Club Creative Arts Centre, Hong Kong
    Gail Nichols: Atmosphere / Narek Galleries, Tanja, NSW, Australia
    Alexis Rago: Chaos Contained / Crafts Study Centre, Farnham, UK
    Body and Soul: New International Ceramics / MAD Museum, New York
    Fired Earth, Woven Bamboo: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics and Bamboo Art / Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

    Jobs and residencies
    Byrdcliffe Artist in Residence Program, Woodstock, New York
    Red Lodge Clay Center Long Term Residency, Montana, USA
    Assistant Professor Ceramics at Alberta College of Art + Design (ACAD), Calgary, Canada

    Ceramics Now
    Ceramics Now Magazine announces open Call for Papers (Issue 3)

  • Month in Review: March 2013

    Month in Review, March 2013 at Ceramics Now - Contemporary ceramics

    Hello friends. Welcome to Month in Review, a summary of the last month of activity here at Ceramics Now.
    Sign up for our email newsletter and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus.

    We offer limited sponsorship opportunities for those who want to connect with our global readership of professional artists and ceramic art enthusiasts.

    Subscribe to Ceramics Now Magazine, the international bi-annual journal that promotes critical discussion about contemporary ceramics through interviews, artist projects and reviews.

    Exhibitions
    In Harmony: The Norma Jean Calderwood Collection of Islamic Art / Harvard Art Museums, Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Cambridge
    Molly Hatch: REVERIE / Philadelphia Art Alliance, United States
    2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award / The Ian Potter Centre, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
    New Blue and White / Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
    NCECA 2013 National Student Juried Exhibition / Glassell School of Art, Houston
    NCECA 2013 Ceramics Biennial / Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, USA
    Emmanuel Boos and Esben Klemann: Systematic Uncertainty / Copenhagen Ceramics
    365 ceramic objects by Guillaume Bardet / Musée de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains, Lausanne
    Matthew Harris & Tim Rowan exhibition / Erskine, Hall & Coe, London
    Object Focus: The Bowl / Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland
    Ancient Southwest: Peoples, Pottery and Place / University of Colorado Museum of Natural History
    Three Decades of West Coast Ceramics, 1956–1986 / Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    International Glass and Clay Exhibit 2013 / Pepco Edison Place Gallery, Washington DC

    Jobs and residencies
    Taiwan Ceramics Residency Program 2013 / New Taipei City Yingge Ceramics Museum
    Victoria & Albert Museum Ceramics Residency / London, UK
    Studio Art Technician at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, USA
    Ceramics Faculty Position at Indiana Wesleyan University, Marion
    Assistant Professor - Ceramics at Western Illinois University
    Assistant Professor of Art - Ceramics at Westminster College, Salt Lake City
    Assistant Professor of Ceramics at Western New Mexico University, Silver City

    Calls for applications and News
    First edition of Cluj International Ceramics Biennale (CICB 2013)
    Applications are open for the ceramic symposiums in Latvia

    Ceramics Now
    Ceramics Now launches Issue 2 of Ceramics Now Magazine

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