Ceramic artists list
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conceptual


Mimicry Chairs by Nendo

Japanese design studio Nendo has conceived a collection of ‘Mimicry Chairs’ composed of pressed and punched metal and lacquered white to give it a ghost-like aesthetic. The project’s philosophy is generated through reinterpreting and multiplying a single white chair in ten different ways, where the series will then appear in ten varying locations throughout the V&A Victoria & Albert Museum. During 2012 London Design Festival - the experience beginning in the main entrance of the museum. The journey then carries on throughout the space - positioning the chairs in galleries, staircases and corridors. each design has been carefully created to reflect and ‘mimic’ the location in which it is placed - poetically communicating the relationship an object shares with its environment. (via designboom)

Photos by Daici Ano.

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(Source: arpeggia)

  • Jason Hackett: Two Beards, 2012, Ceramic, gold leaf, 14” x 24” x 5”

  • Bente Skjøttgaard

    Bente Skjottgaard Contemporary Danish Ceramics

    Bente Skjøttgaard's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    “The basic elements in my work are the materials: clay and glaze. I enjoy engaging in expressive ceramic experiments that test the boundaries of material and form.
    I often take my point of departure in nature’s principles and regularities of form. This results in strange inscrutable sculptural growths and large wild and amorphous nature abstractions that may be both lush and melancholic with an expression of beauty in both growth and decay.” Bente Skjøttgaard

    “Bente Skjøttgaard is a ceramist: she was born in 1961. In much the same manner as a runner or an existential philosopher, she is cultivating her material, which is clay overcoated with an application of glaze. She is a master of her field and she is “inside” the clay in the sense that she is challenging herself each and every time she creates a new work. The glazed pieces are constantly becoming larger and more voluminous, with interiors consisting of complicated constructions, as is the case inside a person or an animal, a prehistoric creature or another biological phenomenon. And the beauty cannot be mistaken. It is a kind of primeval nature, but accordingly a nature that is created both from within and from without, in the course of a protracted reciprocal interplay.” Excerpt from “Elements in white”, a text By Erik Steffensen - Professor at The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Copenhagen.

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  • Bente Skjøttgaard: Frieze P7 no 1215, 2012, Stoneware and glaze, 176 x 43 x 7 cm. Photo: Jeppe Gudmundsen-Holmgreen

  • Bente Skjøttgaard: Traces – Art along Hærvejen, At the ancient road Hærvejen nature trail, close to the village of Bække in Central Jutland DK, approx. 40 m2. A project by the Danish Arts Foundation, 2010.


  • Bente Skjøttgaard: The “Hærvejen” Art Project under construction at Gråsten Agricultural College, February 2010. Petersen Tegl A/S in Broager has sponsored 10 tons of red brickwork clay.

  • Ruth Power: Stomach (Cephalophilia), 2011, 48cm wide x 42cm long x 14cm deep; porcelain, LED light, cord, plug, wooden box with black paint and flocked interior

  • Annie Woodford: Splinter 2, 2010, Porcelain, copper, stainless steel, 30x25x30 cm.

  • Kimberly Cook: Divided Kingdom, variable, porcelain, copper, electrical wire, 2011

  • Kimberly Cook: Superstition of Security, 33.5” x 23” x 16”, stoneware, glaze, mason stain, gold luster, 2011

  • Marianne McGrath: “Maybe we can grow something on top of it all…”, 2010, unfired earthenware, plywood, string, wax, 5’ x 5’ x 5’

  • Interview with Ian Shelly, Ceramic Installation - October 2011

    Interview with ceramic artist Ian Shelly - Ceramic Installation, October 2011

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    → The full interview with Ian Shelly is featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue One, Winter 2011-2012.

    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : You’re a very prolific artist, with lots of exhibitions, lectures and workshops being held in the last years. How do you find the time needed for all of this? Do you also teach?

    Ian Shelly: Thank you for the considering me prolific, that is an adjective that has been used before to describe not only the breadth and quantity of what I do and what I call “My” art but a diagnosis that I find most properly describes my unyielding need to make. I don’t know how to make art any other way…never have. I think that the only way to find the time to work “prolifically” is by making the best out of all the other tasks that you do. Be it exhibiting, lecturing, and teaching workshops. All of these moments and all of the moments not making provide us with a unique opportunity to think, plan and daydream. I need my time spent talking about other artists to think of how I am different. I also need my time as a Sunday afternoon mechanic fixing things around the house to remind my brain that my hands like moving this way or that. All of this activity then tells my wallet what kind of clay and glaze I need to use to keep my brain and hands satisfied. My brain still cannot keep up with my hands.
    The teaching that I also do is like a buffet. In some ways it provides me with necessary exercises that a growing artist needs to flourish. It also provides me with a multitude of materials and technologies to further understand the science and dexterity needed for ceramics. I find one of the most helpful aspects of teaching to be the communication development. When I started in education, I couldn’t walk a person through making a paper airplane, and now, through all of the practice I can teach all kinds of different styles of airplanes. Most importantly, I, myself, make a better airplane. This has been very helpful. Inevitably though, if you do too much, like any buffet…it isn’t healthy.

    Ian Shelly Contemporary ceramic installation

    Playtime (detail) - View his works

    Like the system and language of chemistry, your works behave like an equation, trying to connect human relationships. Tell us about the process of constructing a new work, from sketch to firing.

    This is a great question. One that I believe all artists answer differently at different times in their careers and lives. My works attempt to answer relationship equations in the final product but also in the process in which they are made. Like I say in just about every artist statement and writing I do, I see my art making and general studio process as a living, breathing, eating, growing and even more important, a mutating organism. One that is fed helpful amounts of media then distilled and filtered clumsily through screens made of new materials and techniques. Like any healthy science project, random samples are taken to ensure the highest quality of homogenization and communication. At times it is absolutely similar to a chemical equation made of compounds and bonds, but one that is never ending, moving and ultimately insolvable.
    Ian Shelly Contemporary ceramic installationI am sure that we all do things like these in our pursuits to make art. For me, I believe it is important to keep the theme and scenarios of my project in mind. In the case of this work, the themes are systematic and a-systematic routines of study and classification. I think what you may be asking is whether or not I start with sketches and end in a fired ceramic work that installs in a viewing space. Of course I do. However, it rarely follows the paths that I see my colleagues using. Sometimes I wish it did, because I wonder if I would be more productive with someone else’s art routine.
    The journey that my work follows often begins with an accidental gluing of one thing to another and after a very calculated series of profanity and failures, what you see is my work…in all of it’s sticky, gooey, orb-ness.

    What is your present project? Tell us about it.

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