Kimberly Cook

Kimberly Cook Contemporary Ceramics on Ceramics Now Magazine

Kimberly Cook's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

“Awkward primitive animal instincts lie unconsciously in our genetic make-up.  Dominance, survival, reproduction, and group instinct feed our propensity to digress into our egos; cruelty, alpha status, fight or flight, sexual exploits, and pack mentality.  In my body of work I create imagery that embodies tension and anxiety, while also reflecting animalistic traits and certain elements of human ritualistic thought and control that intrigue me.  Using clay as my primary sculptural material allows me to explore these thoughts and questions using techniques that actually originated in human ritualistic practices.  Figures, deities, and fetishes were modeled into both animal and human form for magical or religious practices long before clay was used for utilitarian ware.  This harnessing of imagery deemed as powerful has survived for centuries, allowing humans to access manifestations of supernatural forces believed to improve their daily struggles in life. 

Personally and intuitively driven, my work with imagery of animals is grounded in the exploration of the universal human condition, focusing on aspects of the ceremonial; serving as embodiments for the physical, spiritual, and psychological being. My preoccupation with human existence, alienation, fear and apathy, is what motivates me to express elements of autobiography, ritual, and the significance of life’s struggles.  Working between narrative and abstract, revealing both the perception of power and powerlessness, the figures and symbols that I create are often purposely rendered disfigured and dysfunctional.” Kimberly Cook

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Valérie Blass exhibition / Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Canada

Valérie Blass exhibition at Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Valérie Blass exhibition / Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Canada
2 February - 22 April 2012

Employing virtually every sculptural technique—from moulding, casting, carving and modelling to assemblage and bricolage — Valérie Blass explores the territories between animal, human and inanimate forms, creating strange, hybrid objects.

The impact of Valérie Blass’s work resides in the anachronistic way she navigates between two sculptural traditions. She makes free-standing, vertical, handmade, humanscale, autonomous pieces that locate her squarely within the classical tradition of figurative sculpture. But the diversity of her materials and the plethora of mass-produced, bought and found objects she uses, stemming from an enthusiastic engagement with the material culture of the twenty-first century, anchor her art in assemblage and bricolage.

The exhibition, which contains approximately thirty new works, is accompanied by a major publication that includes essays by the curator, Lesley Johnstone, and by feminist art historian Amelia Jones, as well as an interview with the artist by Wayne Baerwaldt. It is Blass’s largest exhibition to date, following her participation in the inaugural Québec Triennial at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal in 2008 and numerous group and solo exhibitions in Montréal and across Canada.

Born in Montréal in 1967, Valérie Blass holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in visual and media arts from the Université du Québec à Montréal. In addition to participating in the first Triennial mounted by the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, she has had solo exhibitions at Parisian Laundry, in 2008 and 2011, and the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto, in 2009. In 2010, she took part in group exhibitions organized by the National Gallery of Canada, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. Her works were also previously seen at the Power Plant and the Blackwood Gallery in Toronto, and at Galerie Clark in Montréal.

Curator: Lesley Johnstone

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Stefano Calligaro / For not turning all my nothing into something - SABOT, Cluj-Napoca

Stefano Calligaro / For not turning all my nothing into something, Sabot Gallery - Cluj-Napoca

STEFANO CALLIGARO / For not turning all my nothing into something, SABOT, Cluj-Napoca

7 October - 12 November 2011

now imagine the water
it being transparent and clean
not only in a glass
but as a pond
a river
as the ocean
imagine as if it were all things
sounds
colours
your thoughts
your gestures
some simple shapes a bunch of photos
an untold story
two angles perpendicular
a wooden brick
the bag that’s hanging on your shoulder
a nice warm summer

Stefano Calligaro / For not turning all my nothing into something

somehow the waves are moving
aligned
somehow they do

now imagine a snowball not bigger than your fist
solid compact white pure
watch it
ten seconds
and turn it
feel its weight
its bright-lit colours nicely shaped

keep yourself busy

stretch out your hands
let fall into the water

—————————————————-
Stefano Calligaro (Cividale del Friuli, 1976) is an Italian artist living and working in Rotterdam. His work revolves around intuitive and simple gestures, hermetic elements, and shapes. The outcome is usually a floating idea, an object, a note, or just a trace almost hidden to our view. Recent exhibitions include Plants, rocks and a fish inhabited pond, Wcw gallery, Hamburg; Quiet is the new loud, Hotel Mariakapel, Hoorn; Lobby, Cell project space, London; and The object of the attack, The David Roberts Art Foundation, London.

www.hardfolk.it / www.pforpond.com/private1.htm

SABOT
exhibition space: 59-61 Henri Barbusse street,
400616, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
mailing address: 12 Horea street, ap. 10,
400038, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Mob.: +40723224105
info@galeria-sabot.ro
www.galeria-sabot.ro 

Natalia Dias: Waterfall, detail of installation over 70 Ox tongues, 2010, porcelain, 250x350x27cm

Natalia Dias: Waterfall, detail of installation over 70 Ox tongues, 2010, porcelain, 250x350x27cm

Overthrown: Linda Sormin, Mine (i hear him unclip me / blood runs cold), detail, 2010–11.    Glazed ceramic; souvenir kitsch; and studio remnants from Tim Berg,    Gerit Grimm, Nathan Craven, Robyn Gray, and Ted Yoon. Photo by Jeff    Wells. #3

Overthrown: Linda Sormin, Mine (i hear him unclip me / blood runs cold), detail, 2010–11. Glazed ceramic; souvenir kitsch; and studio remnants from Tim Berg, Gerit Grimm, Nathan Craven, Robyn Gray, and Ted Yoon. Photo by Jeff Wells. #3

Overthrown: Linda Sormin, Mine (i hear him unclip me / blood runs cold), detail, 2010–11.    Glazed ceramic; souvenir kitsch; and studio remnants from Tim Berg,    Gerit Grimm, Nathan Craven, Robyn Gray, and Ted Yoon. Photo by Jeff    Wells.

Overthrown: Linda Sormin, Mine (i hear him unclip me / blood runs cold), detail, 2010–11. Glazed ceramic; souvenir kitsch; and studio remnants from Tim Berg, Gerit Grimm, Nathan Craven, Robyn Gray, and Ted Yoon. Photo by Jeff Wells.

Overthrown: Linda Sormin, Mine (i hear him unclip me / blood runs cold), 2010–11.   Glazed ceramic; souvenir kitsch; and studio remnants from Tim Berg,   Gerit Grimm, Nathan Craven, Robyn Gray, and Ted Yoon. Photo by Jeff   Wells.

Overthrown: Linda Sormin, Mine (i hear him unclip me / blood runs cold), 2010–11. Glazed ceramic; souvenir kitsch; and studio remnants from Tim Berg, Gerit Grimm, Nathan Craven, Robyn Gray, and Ted Yoon. Photo by Jeff Wells.

Overthrown: Paul Sacaridiz, An Incomplete Articulation (detail), 2011. Porcelain, powder-coated aluminum, steel, paper, cut vinyl, and wood. Photo by Jeff Wells.

Overthrown: Paul Sacaridiz, An Incomplete Articulation (detail), 2011. Porcelain, powder-coated aluminum, steel, paper, cut vinyl, and wood. Photo by Jeff Wells.

Overthrown: Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis, 2010–11. Porcelain,  paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted  tools, steel  and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents,  electrical  cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper,  beeswax.

Overthrown: Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis, 2010–11. Porcelain, paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted tools, steel and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents, electrical cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper, beeswax.

Overthrown: Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis (detail), 2010–11.  Porcelain, paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted   tools, steel and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents,   electrical cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper,   beeswax. #2

Overthrown: Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis (detail), 2010–11. Porcelain, paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted tools, steel and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents, electrical cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper, beeswax. #2

Overthrown: Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis (detail), 2010–11. Porcelain, paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted  tools, steel and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents,  electrical cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper,  beeswax.

Overthrown: Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis (detail), 2010–11. Porcelain, paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted tools, steel and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents, electrical cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper, beeswax.

Overthrown:   Clare Twomey, Collecting the edges. 2011. Red clay dust. Site-specific   project for the Denver Art Museum supported by Jana and Fred Bartlit.   Photo by Jeff Wells. #6

Overthrown: Clare Twomey, Collecting the edges. 2011. Red clay dust. Site-specific project for the Denver Art Museum supported by Jana and Fred Bartlit. Photo by Jeff Wells. #6

Overthrown:   Clare Twomey, Collecting the edges. 2011. Red clay dust. Site-specific   project for the Denver Art Museum supported by Jana and Fred Bartlit.   Photo by Jeff Wells. #5

Overthrown: Clare Twomey, Collecting the edges. 2011. Red clay dust. Site-specific project for the Denver Art Museum supported by Jana and Fred Bartlit. Photo by Jeff Wells. #5