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conceptual

Interview with Ian F. Thomas, Ceramic Installation - October 2011

Interview with ceramic artist Ian F. Thomas - Ceramic Installation, October 2011

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→ The full interview is featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue One, Winter 2011-2012.

Ceramics Now Magazine
: You are a very creative artist, working with large scale installations, ceramic objects, sculptures, vessels and various drawings. When do you have time to transpose all your emotions and ideas into them?

Ian F. Thomas: Thank you. I obsess about ideas. My methodology for making, for creating, has me developing many works at the same time, not just in the beginning phases, the thought process, but also during the construction phase. Mold making, throwing, painting, welding, drawing, functional, non-functional—everything that happens, it all develops simultaneously. I enjoy working right up to, and, sometimes, past my limit. I view making work on all of these different platforms, using different materials, and incorporating as many ideas as I can ideas in the same way that I see conversations. Each day I have vastly different types of conversations with many different people; from humorous to serious, political to chit chat and minutiae. When an idea surfaces, the process may demand a particular size, finish, or material. Following the concept and its needs supersedes the necessity of conforming to a particular style or material. 

As a father of two, husband and professor, it is difficult to manage time. My wife, Lori, who is not an artist, has an amazing tolerance for the creatively obsessed mind. If it were not for her support, I would never find the time to work on so many projects. Working with clay, I can take advantage of the timing/drying constraints, and toggle between works, maximizing my available studio time. I have also recently taken on an assistant, Eli Blasko, to help better manage my time so that I can focus more in the studio.

Ian F Thomas Contemporary Ceramic Installation Art

Di-analytic Variables - View Ian F. Thomas’ works
Wheel-thrown, altered, hand-built, earthenware, electric fired cone 02, steel, paint, gold leaf / 38x37x30 inches, 40 lbs

How do you see this relationship between idea/intuition and the final work itself? Is it always continuous or sometimes gap comes through?

The final work is an entity all of its own. An idea starts the work and then intuition supports that idea during the development of the piece. I keep true to a cautious respect for the moment. While I’m in the process of working, my intuition may shift the work’s original intentions, or trigger a new idea(s) that can rearrange the work while I’m still in the process of making it. My idea can fluctuate as much as the physical object I’m making. Using this method, gaps occurs naturally and when that happens, I embrace that.

Read More

  • Stefano Calligaro / For not turning all my nothing into something - SABOT, Cluj-Napoca

    Stefano Calligaro / For not turning all my nothing into something, Sabot Gallery - Cluj-Napoca

    STEFANO CALLIGARO / For not turning all my nothing into something, SABOT, Cluj-Napoca

    7 October - 12 November 2011

    now imagine the water
    it being transparent and clean
    not only in a glass
    but as a pond
    a river
    as the ocean
    imagine as if it were all things
    sounds
    colours
    your thoughts
    your gestures
    some simple shapes a bunch of photos
    an untold story
    two angles perpendicular
    a wooden brick
    the bag that’s hanging on your shoulder
    a nice warm summer

    Stefano Calligaro / For not turning all my nothing into something

    somehow the waves are moving
    aligned
    somehow they do

    now imagine a snowball not bigger than your fist
    solid compact white pure
    watch it
    ten seconds
    and turn it
    feel its weight
    its bright-lit colours nicely shaped

    keep yourself busy

    stretch out your hands
    let fall into the water

    —————————————————-
    Stefano Calligaro (Cividale del Friuli, 1976) is an Italian artist living and working in Rotterdam. His work revolves around intuitive and simple gestures, hermetic elements, and shapes. The outcome is usually a floating idea, an object, a note, or just a trace almost hidden to our view. Recent exhibitions include Plants, rocks and a fish inhabited pond, Wcw gallery, Hamburg; Quiet is the new loud, Hotel Mariakapel, Hoorn; Lobby, Cell project space, London; and The object of the attack, The David Roberts Art Foundation, London.

    www.hardfolk.it / www.pforpond.com/private1.htm

    SABOT
    exhibition space: 59-61 Henri Barbusse street,
    400616, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
    mailing address: 12 Horea street, ap. 10,
    400038, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
    Mob.: +40723224105
    info@galeria-sabot.ro
    www.galeria-sabot.ro 

  • Matt Johnson, Star in a Jar, 2011, Glass, electronics, 6 1/2 x 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches, Pedestal: 40 1/2 x 21 x 21 inches (via)

    Exhibition at Blum & Poe, September 10 - October 22, 2011

  • Ian F. Thomas: Di-analytic Variables, Wheel-thrown, altered, hand-built, earthenware, electric fired cone 02, steel, paint, gold leaf / 38x37x30 inches, 40 lbs

  • Ian F. Thomas: The Eagle and the Arrow, interior detail, Plastic army men, arrows, paint, 4 inches thick

  • Ian F. Thomas: The Eagle and the Arrow, Wheel-thrown porcelain, slip, gas fired cone 6, graphite, image transfer, arrows, elementary school chair, gilded brick kiln stilt, paint / 40x16x16 inches, 45 lbs

  • Ian F. Thomas: Buttoning Buttons and Loosening Teeth, Wheel-thrown platter, solid-carved/hollowed tooth, earthenware, electric fired cone 02, paint, graphite, string, vintage doorknob / 50x20x8 inches, 12lbs

  • Susan Meyer: unité d’habitation, 2009, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, aluminum, wood, video and sound, dimensions variable

  • Susan Meyer: Vinyl, 2011, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, aluminum, 35” x 10” x 10”

  • Susan Meyer: work in progress (detail), 2011, concrete, cardboard, acrylic, H-O scale figures, lights and succulent plants, dimensions variable

  • Susan Meyer: Swimming Hole, detail #2

  • Susan Meyer: Together, alternative view, 2008, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, wood, video and sound, dimensions variable

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