Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

contemporary art


Constance McBride: The Lonely Girls, 2013

In this series, works depicting physical aging and a gendered issue surrounding dementia are engaged from a female point of view. Questions surrounding social responsibility are visited through an intimate look at a mother’s dilemma. My focus shifted to my mother after a few years of observing and caring for her while she navigated her days living with Alzheimer’s disease. My mother’s countenance emerges in the work through clay figures over a period of time and through multiplicity. By investigating concrete representations and creating situations that the viewer will identify with, I hope to engage the viewer in a deeper way.

  • The Dance of Infinity

    Article by Hagai Segev, 2014

    “Up until two years ago, my father, Yaakov, had an agricultural mechanization workshop. Every time I visited the workshop, I found myself entranced by the power of the iron boards and the pile of black and rust colored iron pipes of different diameters, waiting to be used”, Simcha Even-Chen reminisces.

    “When I saw the call for entries for the contest and exhibition at Kapfenberg, Austria, entitled “At the Moment”, I decided to use these memories of my father’s workshop. This was the birth of “A Moment Before…” a work I created in 2009, which has since led to the growth of a whole body of works”.1

    Simcha Even-Chen Contemporary Ceramics

    A moment before…, 2009, Mixtures of stoneware and porcelain, 11.5 x 30 x 24 cm.

    The memories that awakened this body are the evolution of the artistic research Even-Chen had been immersed in during the period of 2006-2009. This group of sculptures, entitled “Illusion”, was exhibited at The Fifth Israeli Ceramics Biennale at The Eretz Israel Museum (2008), among other places, and even received the Gold Coast International Ceramic Art Award. The article that appeared in the biennale catalogue read: “Simcha Even-Chen creates arrays of objects, reminiscent of game pieces. The pieces and geometric shapes simulate complex mathematical relations, based on scientific principles of simplification, alongside an awareness of the complexity of the game”.2

    In her works from the period of 2009-2010, as her research progressed, the cubic shapes and structures gained a softer sculptural presence. They were positioned on solid, dominant foundations, where the first, barely noticeable signs of a light, flowing motion began to appear. In a piece named “Triple Balance” (2010), the massiveness and relatively harsh geometry of the top object is softened somewhat by the gentle presence of the foundation, which seemingly serves as only that, but its connection suggests an integrated statement, alongside a message of contrasts. This piece was featured in important exhibitions in Italy and Korea.3

    In the piece entitled “Motion” (2011), all the elements of movement and flow can for the first time, be seen in the object itself, while the pattern printed on the object surface continues to explore the geometric shape, namely, the grid, which stands out against the background of evenly hued material. This piece was awarded first prize in an exhibition in Slovenia.4

    Simcha Even-Chen Contemporary Ceramic art

    Motion, 2011, Mixtures of stoneware and porcelain, 25 x 46 x 25 cm.

    “My decision to add the element of movement to the existing physical balance gave birth to the open, broad, flowing motions and expanded the variety of imaginary shapes”, says Even-Chen. Her intentional break-away from defined shapes gave way to a new abundance of form, organic and free. The well-defined lines of geometric shapes were unleashed, and became the flowing lines that outline the movements of a dance, in which the body of the dancer is pushed to its limit. The flowing lines move in circles, twist, constrict and expand again. They face the material’s ability to carry itself to the limits of its natural properties.

    While her earlier works studied the foundations of the material, these works examine its potential to reach infinity. Even-Chen’s work tests the material’s point of collapse, asking which points need to be supported to prevent the structure from breaking down or falling. This constant fear of collapse can be seen even now, when the sculptures are fired and stable. Their fragility is present in each and every moment. Within this fragility lies a hidden power: the almost inconceivable resilience of gentleness.

    All of Even-Chen’s works address the tension between that which is planned and that which is not; between the expected and the unexpected. Inside the scientific thought-process, the basis of Even-Chen’s thinking, there is also a search for an emotional balance – an important element in her life, which has now found a clear outlet. But at the same time, these works continue to manifest their scientific foundation by dealing with the existence of movement within the limitations of the material.

    Even-Chen’s study of the materials she has elected to work with reveals a search for release from familiar outlines. Her dealing with organic shapes is an expression of her search for freedom within the framework of her beloved material. The conceptual framework, too, leans on that, which is known, or can be derived from accrued knowledge; or on a memory that surfaces from time to time. But this reliance is but a starting point, a jumping board towards new destinations, which may not be as familiar, but are certainly more intriguing.

    Simcha Even-Chen Ceramic exhibition at Benyamini Contemporary Ceramics Center Tel Aviv

    Balance in Motion is on through July 5, 2014, at the Benyamini Contemporary Ceramics Center, Tel Aviv.

    Even-Chen’s sculptures are autonomous bodies that stand independent of narrative or objectification. They have no practical use; one can only gaze upon them and marvel at the tackling of space, sculpting and aesthetics. In this aspect, they are unique in the field of applied ceramics. Their intrinsic presence allows the viewer to disregard the personal and psychological associations and examine them as autonomous bodies, existing in a sculpting space, evoking thoughts of an object’s place in the universe and raising for discussion values that stand apart from the body of their creator, if only for a moment. This possibility offers many different levels of coping with the artistic creation: a sort of Möbius strip that leads the eye and the hand in a seemingly paradoxical trajectory that cannot exist in the real world.

    These abstract qualities, the flow of curves in the ceramics, raise associations of the enormous sculptures of minimalist sculptor, Richard Serra. In his colossal, steel structures, Serra managed to formulate a refined minimalistic presence that has a profound effect on viewers who walk in their vicinity. Dwarfed by the presence of these monumental pieces, the viewer is invited to follow their outline and form sequential shapes, as he strolls between them or alongside them. The active walking and touching of the fierce metal bodies make the viewer a participant in the physical experience of sculpting.

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  • Lucia Pizzani: The Worshipper of the Image at Beers Contemporary, London
    June 6 - July 26, 2014

    Artist talk with Lucia Pizzani and Lorena Muñoz-Alonso: Thursday, July 3, from 7 pm.

    Courtesy the artist and Beers Contemporary, London.

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  • Matthew Szösz: Complications / Zane Bennett Gallery, Sante Fe

    Matthew Szosz Glass exhibition at Zane Bennett Galery

    Matthew Szösz: Complications / Zane Bennett Gallery, Sante Fe
    June 27 - July 19, 2014

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art is pleased to announce Complications, an exhibition of works in glass by Matthew Szösz. The opening is Friday, June 27, at the gallery, from 5-7 pm as part of the Railyard Arts District Last Friday Artwalk.

    Matthew Szösz, born in Providence Rhode Island, resides and practices in northern California. He holds a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts, a Bachelor’s of Industrial Design and a Master of Fine Arts in Glass all from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), and has been awarded grants by prestigious institutions in his field such as the L.C. Tiffany Foundation. Szösz has held numerous artist residencies all over the world including the Danish Royal Academy. Szösz has an extremely impressive resume for an artist of such a young age.

    Szösz’s creative process involves investigation of his chosen materials, resulting in a dance or a dialogue between artist and material. His interest lies in the moment of transformation which is what fuels his impulse to create.

    Szösz’s interest is focused on what glass can do and will do when exposed to a variety of conditions inflicted by the artist, resulting in a state of controlled chaos. Of this, Szösz states "The work produced is left deliberately unmodified as much as possible after the shaping so that the connection of the finished form to the process is emphasized to the viewer, as this relationship illustrates the central thrust of the work, that form is the result of physics, rather than the artist, and that the work itself is creator of its own identity." The invention of new techniques and processes not only keep Szösz interested in his medium, the results inform him and push his process further.

    Matthew Szösz’s latest works consist of several separate bodies of work including Inflatables, Expandables, and Rigging pieces. The Rigging pieces appear as delicate strands of rope fused together into different shapes. The viewer does not, at first realize the works in this series are glass. The minute detail in each of the Rigging works are a wonder to behold. With the Inflatables compressed air is added to fused pieces of glass while still hot, creating forms that are full and at times pillow-like.

    The Expandables are created by pulling glass apart. Inflatables and Expandables compliment each other in their opposition to each other, one feeling more solid while the other appears almost stretched and pulled to its limit, showing strength in its delicate construction. These works clearly prove Szösz’s statement: "Much of my work is an effort to achieve a synergy between opposites- order and chaos, craft and experimentation, the deliberate and the accidental, allowing two opposites to come together and complement and enhance each other."

    Matthew Szosz’s work incorporates science and art. Both the process and the outcome are equally intriguing. His work embodies, as American physician and NASA astronaut, Mae Carol Jemison so eloquently stated: "The difference between science and the arts is not that they are different sides of the same coin, or even different parts of the same continuum, but rather, they are manifestations of the same thing. The arts and sciences are avatars of human creativity."

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  • Jamie Bates Slone: Phenotypes, 2014

    I have developed a process utilizing my knowledge of various casting methods and glaze, chemistry to create forms made entirely glaze. The color and texture is appealing and repulsive at the same time. When viewed through a magnifying glass the surface resembles Scanning Electron Micrographs of cancer cells. The fragile and fleeting appearance of these pieces symbolizes the transient nature of human life. This series of glaze, casted hands represent the genetic passing of disease from generation to generation. It is my fear that my family’s history with cancer is somehow genetic.

  • Watt’s Up? Ceramics and Light / Bernardaud Foundation, Limoges, France

    Watt’s Up? Ceramics and Light / Bernardaud Foundation, Limoges, France
    June 13 - November 29, 2014

    Watt’s Up? explores the relationship between ceramics and light by presenting some thirty works of art from all over the world, all created in recent years. Oddly enough, this relationship seems to inspire artists more than designers, trained to create objects such as lamps. Perhaps that’s because light transcends objects and gives us a whole new take on the world. Light affects our vision by modifying our perception of space and movement. In addition, there is a symbolic, poetic and mysterious element to it. As the French author Jean Giono once put it, very clever mysteries hide in the light. If light and ceramics go hand in hand, it’s mainly courtesy of porcelain’s unique properties of translucency, which can give light – produced by a candle or a tungsten filament – a soft, poetic aura and elicit a feeling of wonder. Ceramics offers a broad palette of sensations to play with. Faience is heavy, glossy and sensual in its interaction with light. Pottery absorbs lux units and asserts its own material plasticity to counter the intangible nature of light. Porcelain is lightweight and translucent, and the matte aspect of unglazed biscuit forms a striking contrast with the gloss of the glaze. Watt’s Up? is an unprecedented investigation of the latest innovations and know-how, both sensorial and intellectual in scope. As the topic was complex and broke new ground, it took nearly two years of research to bring these thirty or so works together. These works are by fifteen artists exhibiting for the first time in France. They are the result of technical prowess – manual and technical – as well as fresh creative thinking. None of them represent any particular school of thought, creative trend or artistic movement. Each work is an explosion of creativity, born of the artist’s reflections and inspiring a sense of wonder. This exhibition sheds new light on the art of ceramics.

    Curated by Cédric Morisset
    A double major in art history and cultural management, Cédric Morisset started out in contemporary art and gravitated towards design. He then moved into curating art shows, starting in 2003 at the invitation of the international design biennial in Lisbon and continuing in this line of work for several exhibitions presented in France and other countries, including French Reference (Shanghai and Canton, 2008), Icons of Design (Sao Paulo, 2009) and Nouvelle Vague (Milan, 2011 and 2013). Cédric Morisset contributes articles on design to AD magazine and the daily newspaper Le Figaro on a regular basis. From 2010 to 2012, he served as head curator for the annual AD Interieurs exhibition held by AD magazine. Since 2013, Cédric Morisset has headed the design department at the PIASA auction house in Paris.

    Exhibiting artists

    Frances and Dominic Bromley Ceramics

    Frances & Dominic Bromley, Shoal 1672, 2008, Natural unglazed English fine bone china © Mark Wood Photography

    Frances & Dominic Bromley
    Since Frances & Dominic Bromley started their design studio Scabetti in 1999, their work in ceramics has earned considerable critical acclaim in the UK and across the world. Their designs are light, precise and elegant, and realised in fine bone china in their studio in Leek, North Staffordshire. Their first venture into light sculpture in 2004, was inspired by moths being attracted to candle light. Drawn to the Light, was composed of sculpted curved elements made out of bone china which appeared to be floating around the central light source. During London’s Design Festival in 2007, the couple presented Shoal, a suspended light sculpture suggesting a school of fish with more than 1500 bone china elements. These pieces paved the way for a series of bespoke commissions, which are now a Scabetti specialty. One commission for the International Maritime Organisation had 3,434 stylised bone china anchors arranged in a 5m tall sculpture and is on permanent display at their London Headquarters. Frances & Dominic Bromley have created Ascension especially for the Watt’s Up exhibition and their imagination has reached new heights. This new installation, made of English fine bone china, features hundreds of human forms that seem to be rising through the air towards the light. The creative talent of this design duo has added poetry to technical expertise.

    Frances Bromley (b. 1969) and Dominic Bromley (b. 1971) majored in Industrial Design at Brunel University, London. They live and work in Leek, near Stoke-on-Trent, England.

    Jeremy Cole Ceramics

    Jeremy Cole, Cymbidium chandelier, 2012, Porcelain © Lindsay Keats

    Jeremy Cole
    The master artisan from New Zealand has been highly sought-after by the luxury sector since 2005. His remarkable porcelain lighting fixtures are inspired by the plant kingdom (e.g. flax, aloe vera, a chyrsalis or orchids). In his studio on the other side of the world, he creates beautifully crafted masterpieces that end up in Bulgari or Harry Winston show windows or at Four Seasons hotels. His unique lamps feature spectacular, poetic forms that imitate Nature; his magical lighting can make them look stylish, disturbing or amusing. And the porcelain orchids in his hanging lamp Cymbidium Orchid actually look dead until the light is turned on, making them come vibrantly alive.

    Born in 1973 Jeremy Cole is a self-taught artists. He lives and works in Wellington, New Zealand.

    Coup de foudre: Goedel Vermandere and Jan Arickx Ceramics

    Coup de foudre: Goedel Vermandere & Jan Arickx, La Vierge, 2010, Porcelain © Peter Verplancke

    Coup de foudre: Goedel Vermandere & Jan Arickx
    Goedel Vermandere used to teach school but became a ceramic artist in the mid 2000s. In 2004, she met an event planner named Jan and it was love at first sight… including at the professional level. As a design team, they went on to create light sculptures from cast porcelain that were remarkable for their sensuous quality and their harmony. The pair also works in steel, copper, stainless steel, paper and tree bark. They are always experimenting with new techniques to illuminate porcelain’s transparence more effectively, express a feeling of warmth and fulfillment, and open up new horizons.” Their creations – whether a hanging lamp forming a horizontal line in space, a standing lamp like a totem pole or a suspended lamp as round as a full moon – are striking for their simplicity and originality. One reason is that each of their pieces, which are fired gradually, starting at a low temperature and building up to 1260°C, is fashioned from hundreds of translucent porcelain petals and gives off a soft, romantic light. This talented twosome knows how to use technical skill to create poetry.

    Goedel Vermandere (b. 1969) is a school teacher trained in ceramics at Syntra-West, Bruges. Jan Arickx (b. 1959) is an event planner. They live and work in Courtrai, Belgium.

    Pucci de Rossi Ceramics

    Pucci de Rossi, Cartona, 2007, Porcelain © Made

    Pucci de Rossi
    Born in Verona, Italy, the artist and designer Pucci de Rossi moved to Paris in 1979. In step with the Memphis Art Movement, launched in Italy in 1981, he influenced the European art and design scene of the 1980s and 1990s. Throughout his career, he developed the wildly poetic side of his nature, not to mention his unbridled imagination. Constantly seeking to reinvent and reinterpret, he liked to use ordinary materials like lead or cardboard to create elegant, highly imaginative objects, and to turn preconceived ideas upside down. Poking fun at the “art or design” controversy, which is still raging, the artist gave everyday objects an ironic narrative treatment that rendered them precious. In the last decade, De Rossi exhibited at art galleries in Paris, such as Catberro, Downtown (François Laffanour) and Anne de Villepoix. Not only did his work impress collectors, but creations bearing his signature made their way into the collections of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. His designs were produced by the editor Made who suggested In 2001 to release limited editions of his one-off objects. Among the latter were Dondola (rocking chair with book shelf, 2004) and his Cartona lamp (2005), which is presented in this exhibition and pays tribute – whether intentionally or not – to Arte Povera. Using fine porcelain to imitate humble cardboard, this creation flirts with contrasts and brings a little whimsy to everyday life.

    Pucci de Rossi, 1947-2013

    Bernadette Doolan Ceramics

    Bernadette Doolan, Nostalgia, 2008, Porcelain © Rory Nolan

    Bernadette Doolan
    For more than fifteen years, the Irish artist Bernadette Doolan has been creating works marked by their intimacy. She sets out to capture and express emotions in porcelain and bronze as well as in her paintings. “My work focuses on life, from the cradle to the grave and everything in between… on our dreams, desires and fears” she explains. The work presented in this show is an assemblage of illuminated box panels using engraved porcelain, which looks different depending on whether the lights are on or off. The artist is interested in our memories and in the motifs, landscapes and impressions stored in our subconscious. “I use objects that are meaningful in a personal way, such as the lace from a First Communion dress, to print on the porcelain surface,” comments Bernadette Doolan. “Sometimes, I even use plastic bubble-wrap, because I love the sound that the bubbles make when they pop!” When the panels are illuminated, the pattern communicates the emotions inherent in the private experience to the viewer.

    Born in 1973 Bernadette Doolan is a self-taught artist. She lives and works in Wexford, Ireland.

    Volker Haug Ceramics

    Volker Haug, Rudolf, 2012, Porcelain © Paul Allister

    Volker Haug
    Based in Melbourne, Australia, the German-born designer Volker Haug designs one-off artisanal lighting creations. He got the idea for his clever Rudolf pendant from the double adaptors to be found on plastic lights in Berlin. The designer amused himself dreaming up all sorts of combinations. After a trip to Milan and a conversation with Ingo Maurer, a master of lighting design, Volker Haug returned to Australia determined to use porcelain for his Antler line. Rudolf revisits traditional chandelier design by assembling porcelain modules in every direction, combining industrial style with porcelain craftsmanship; modularity with unity.

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  • Alexandra Lerman: Immediate Release at Tina Kim Gallery, New York
    May 1 - June 28, 2014

    Courtesy artist and Tina Kim Gallery

    > More exhibitions (gallery) / View the list of ceramic exhibitions


  • Michael Geertsen: Still Life, Still Lives at Jason Jacques Gallery, New York
    May 21 - June 21, 2014

    Courtesy the artist and Jason Jacques Inc.

    > More exhibitions (gallery) / View the ceramic exhibitions list


  • Tristan Stamm: Collections, 2014, Work in progress

    Originally a collection of 26 seedlings/penises, with the tallest being 29 inches and the smallest at 3 inches.

    I had a hard time finding a way to show this collection of seedlings/penises, and eventually found their space when surrounded by my other work.

    I am now working on finding their place in other environments while exploring the idea of collecting and obsessions.


  • Seth Czaplewski: Onsite Sculpture, 2013-2014

    While researching North St. Louis I have uncovered a history of production and self-sufficiency pushed to the periphery, which today is so prevalent in American society that we barely notice. In the early 1800’s the area just North of downtown St. Louis was a communal farmland for residents. There was also a 15-acre plot along the Mississippi river open to residents to use as they wanted.  Both ideas were very progressive for their time and still are, although neither is still in place today. European immigrants once flocked to this area due to failed farming in their homeland. In the case of Henry Overstolz, originally from Germany, once in America his fortune changed when he opened grocery stores. Since then the rapid development of infrastructure has led to a society of convenience. And once again, like in Overstolz’ time of the mid 1800’s, people have fled, as the site cannot meet the needs of the people. My works are inspired by and situated on sites like these.

    With the agricultural and technological revolutions of the mid-twentieth century, skills were traded for convenience in the United States with the implementation of the assembly line, mechanization, and mass production. Skilled craftspeople traded their skills in to work in a factory. The factory did provide some benefits, but within a generation, previous skills were lost. As a result, people no longer know how to construct goods, arrange living space, or grow food needed to sustain life. In my work, I attempt to understand and teach myself all three skills on a small scale in relation to the sites former production. The chain of passed-down knowledge has been broken and a relearning of these skills is essential to understand where we stand today.

    How people live in relation to agriculture throughout recent history is influential to my work. As society is becoming increasingly disconnected from food production we are losing the most basic and necessary skills. These works re-incorporate food production in direct proximity to dwelling, as it is a necessary step backwards to move forwards. Today the average distance it takes food to get to our homes in the U.S. is 1500 to 2500 miles. Although convenient, “progress  is sometimes deceiving and makes us more vulnerable than we once were.  Likewise my structures are precarious, permanently placed outdoors, and vulnerable to the whim of the passerby.

    I rapidly construct these minature dwellings in relation to food production on a scale reminiscent of the anthropological diorama. They are made out of necessity and use past fragments of mass production related to site as material in creating non-linear historically based sculptural markers. I draw upon past people, industry, patterns, and site uses in the creation of new fragments that anticipate, dedicate, and monumentalize the site. Once constructed, the physical objects are situated outdoors entering the strata. They are then documented digitally as the primary ‘art object’.

    Infrastructural changes since the electrification and gassing up of the United States have been influential to my work. In the making of industry, we often lose culture and community, and there has been a considerable amount of unmaking. This unmaking is not isolated to North St. Louis where I currently work. As my needs change and I move to new locations, my work will respond to local histories.

  • Territorios Conmovidos / Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Latinoamericano MACLA, La Plata, Argentina

    Territorios Conmovidos exhibition at MACLA, La Plata 2014

    Territorios Conmovidos / Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Latinoamericano MACLA, La Plata, Argentina
    May 15 - June 29, 2014

    Curated by Lucía Savloff.

    The exhibition was born from the sensations that were aroused to a group of artists from La Plata after the perception of what happened during the terrible flood that hit their city last April 2nd of 2013. The artworks of Marcela Cabutti, Mariela Cantú, Gabriel Fino, Graciela Olio and Paula Massarutti display a diverse set of poetics that allows us to think about how the construction of images and artistic devices participates in the process of building a collective memory.

    Certain circumstances constitute an event to the extent that causes a deviation in the course of our everyday experience. Natural or social tectonic movements displace the foundations on which we build us. The unpredictable breaks, hits, and then opens, letting us see what was below that which has been moved. The flood brought our attention to what we usually don´t look, putting our fragility in public, and revealing that the way we live, build and socially act modifies the territory we inhabit. The artworks in this exhibition do not try to “represent” what happened. The artists conceive the practice of memory from the field of poetry, creating works and devices that function as meeting spaces that enables dialogues unknown a priori. As blocks of sensations or resonance boxes, the artworks create meeting infrastructures and invite to build from its empty spaces. If the disruptive experience operates as a large gap in our symbolic order, the poetic has the ability to register, give presence, or make visible that which escapes in our attempt to narrate what happened.

    Graciela Olio builds small houses with porcelain planes, which cuts and splices together. The house, symbol of the cosmos, is the materialization of our attempt to protect ourselves. But her houses are precarious, sometimes without ceiling or a wall, shelters that rather than creating an interior space, makes themselves visibles. The house crossed by the river has to be one of the most terrifying images. Then comes the adjusting, things acquire a new order, some get lost, others deteriorate. How to move on? The question translates into an impulse to work with what we have, what is left, the remains.

    Worlds are constructed from pre-existing worlds, and in that way to make is to remake says Nelson Goodman. Olio takes some pieces of his series Home and Mil Ladrillos that in After the Storm, are crossed by a transformation processes. She intervenes in her ceramic pieces, testing operations that multiply the work of the unpredictable in its forms. Her works become a testing ground, where she experiments encounters with the possible. Putting back in the process something that was finished entails working with error, with failures. Putting back in the kiln some ceramic pieces, reinforced the deconstructive the process of the forms, to the point where some could no longer stay up. Olio built for them small platforms, supports that served as bases, and became palafittes, structures that rise the houses above the water level in coastal areas or rivers. The support structure becomes a metaphor for the idea of care, of guard of the other. What political infrastructure of affection, encounter and care must we build to create strategies that allow us to survive in this complex and unpredictable territory? How to rethink lifestyles, work, organization and collaboration to create sustainable ways of life? How to coordinate actions of citizen participation in the management of the common, the territory?

    Paula Massarutti delves into the testing of social bonds that implied the emergence of collective strategies to respond the abandonment during the flood. The forms of solidarity and energetic presence of the other, in rescue, shelter and hospitality actions. Starting from a dialogue with the neighbors that live in the adjoining blocks to her house, she creates a fictional space that asks: What are we willing to compromise with the other? Her project imagines the possibility of elaborating an act of agreement or contract between neighbors, which materializes the commitment to mutual aid in case a new catastrophe occurs. Tensioning the boundaries between fiction and the real, the project transits the space between the spontaneous and anonymous solidarity and the will to build a sustained commitment.

    Mariela Cantú overlaps images of the day after the flood, with fragments of a poetic discourse that relates the steps to oblivion after a breakup and audios of old argentine news that talk about the floods in the territory of the province of Buenos Aires. History repeats itself? Cantú intersects the plans for the personal and intimate memory, with those of the great social tragedies. Is it just a matter of scale? Intimate garbage, exiled objects, piles of stuff that become portraits of an unknown other. What images are built in the disordered accumulation of belongings from a certain person when they are devoid of any value? Cantú explores the process that involves any kind of mourning, wondering about intricate work of memory construction, with a critical eye towards the dimension of oblivion.

    Gabriel Fino creates images of the storm, of the chaos-seed, of a transformed landscape in which the structures and boundaries dissolve. His work proceeds by accumulation of layers, and densities of meaning. Produced with infinite patience, it requires from the viewer a similar attitude, an attentive gaze, looking below, in the detail, in the fragment, into the interstices, beyond the delicate gesture that gives strength to the whole. Watching between the lines, and get a glimpse what is born of that mix of the whole, of the beautiful and the ugly, of darkness and light; the life emerges in the mixture of the dirt, the rotten and the forgotten. Allow the water to stagnate, to see the birth of the water lily. To see what germinates from chaos.

    The installation Mirá cuántos barcos aún navegan! (Look how many ships still sail!) by Marcela Cabutti configures a territory that puts our attention in the moment after. An instant that seems to be frozen but which we perceive as vibrant. The work in its apparent stillness does not cease to deploy images. There is something treasured in the traces of its constructive, manual and methodical process. If art preserves, according to Deleuze, a bloc of sensations, in front of this piece we can´t but shudder at the way in which a work may operate as a memory machine. What connections and memories activates, that make us stand before the constructed landscape? Accidentally we assume the attitude of the character, and we find ourselves contemplating as well. Along the way, we become landscape, we become animal, we become others and suddenly we find ourselves playing. The memory that is activated is one certain way of being in the world, one that resonates in the strings that connect us with the looks of childhood, surprise and wonder at the beauty of the world.
    —Lucía Savloff

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  • Michael Geertsen: Still Life, Still Lives / Jason Jacques Gallery, New York

    Michael Geertsen exhibition at Jason Jacques Gallery

    Michael Geertsen: Still Life, Still Lives / Jason Jacques Gallery, New York
    May 21 - June 21, 2014

    Jason Jacques Gallery is pleased to announce its second contemporary exhibition with contemporary ceramic master Michael Geertsen. Following a ceramic installation at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and a show at Puls Ceramics in his native Denmark, Michael Geertsen has come back to show in New York. Geertsen is known for sleek ceramic works with alien-like sculptural bodies, and stacked sculptures of utilitarian objects like plates and cups. His whimsical and animated forms are executed with machine-like precision, thanks to his background in industrial ceramics. Michael claims American streamline design and Italian Futurism as his primary influences.

    His most recent works have reinterpreted ancient Greek pottery, taking the classical forms and integrating them with modernist elements. He adds antlers, knobs and nipples in metallic gold and platinum. The gold and platinum protrusions create mirror like reflections which, when placed next to other works, distort the forms further, shifting perceptions of their form or shape.

    Geertsen says his use of gold and silver is a nod to Western decadence. He started using these elements in his work while exploring Soviet constructivism where Gold and silver screamed hedonism, abundance and American kitsch. The use of gold and silver is also a reaction against 1960’s naturalistic pottery, making the works cheeky and stylized. The artist and scholar Edmond de Waals described his work as always “questioning the place that ceramics has inhabited, as well as the place that ceramics will inhabit in the future.” Michael’s most recent innovations have made that statement even more fitting.

    Geerstsen’s work can be found in the preeminent collections of museums worldwide, from as close as the Metropolitan Museum in New York City to as far as the Incheon Museum in South Korea. His incredible installations can be seen all over the world, from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London to a three dimensional mural in downtown Hanoi Vietnam.

    This exhibition explores the full spectrum of Geertsen’s work from his use of utilitarian objects in stacked futurist sculptures, to free standing sculptural life forms that seem to come from another planet, to his new classical inspired vessels with gilded protrusions. The show is sure to be a spectacular cementing his place among the contemporary greats.

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