Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

crafts

Jason Hess: New Work / Plinth Gallery, Denver, CO, USA

Jason Hess: New Work exhibition at Plinth Gallery, Denver

Jason Hess: New Work / Plinth Gallery, Denver, CO, USA
April 6 - 28, 2012

Opening reception: Friday, April 6th, 6-9 pm.

Jason Hess is a professional ceramic artist and professor who lives in Arizona and instructs at Northern Arizona University. As an “avid wood firer”, his research for over 15 years has focused on the alchemy of the process — how the clay color, wood type, kiln design, and ash dispersion at high temperatures work together to “render a surface that is unattainable in other ways.”

A desire to have objects that fulfill specific purposes inspires him to make functional pots. The infinite and elusive variety of texture and color attainable through the various making and firing processes has generated an interest in the notion of presentation. Some of his work is presented so that a viewer might notice and appreciate subtle diversities in form and surface. By grouping similar forms of differing size and color the compositions create a visually dynamic display, which invites the viewer to enjoy the tactile nature of each individual piece and how they relate to one another.

His ceramic art has been featured in over 125 exhibitions worldwide. Jason has participated in residencies at the Archie Bray Foundation, in Montana, and at The Pottery Workshop in Jingdezhen, China. He has also received numerous research grants from Northern Arizona University to research his medium and for the construction of the kilns. Jason’s work is either utilitarian or refers to utility in form while the presentation is more like characters relating to one another. He holds an MFA degree from Utah State University.

Gallery Hours: Thursday - Saturday, 12-5 pm, and by appointment.

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  • David Gómez Blaya / B4ZAAR Creative Market, Madrid, Spain

    David Gómez Blaya exhibition at B4ZAAR Creative Market, Madrid, Spain

    David Gómez Blaya / B4ZAAR Creative Market, Madrid, Spain
    March 26-30, 2012

    The Adolfo Dominguez Foundation presents the plastic artist and ceramic sculptor David Gómez Blaya in Madrid, Spain.

    The Adolfo Dominguez Foundation will present the ceramic work of David Gómez Blaya, a plastic artist from Madrid between March 26 and March 30 in the B4ZAAR CREATIVE MARKET. The Foundation headquarters are located at calle Serrano, number fifth, next to Puerta de Alcala, subway station of Retiro in Madrid.

    The B4ZAAR CREATIVE MARKET of the Adolfo Domínguez Foundation is dedicated to the promotion of emergent artists and designers. During the last week of March, David Gómez Blaya, a creator born in Madrid, will show his concept of sculptural pottery throughout his work. The visitors will have the opportunity to contemplate his ceramic pieces, as well as to meet personally with this versatile craft maker, and also to acquire his art that will be for sale.

    David is a master potter and has a Bachelor Degree in Fine Arts from Universidad Complutense of Madrid. He began his career in the art world through painting to later work mostly in artistic ceramics. He brings a renewed vision of the ancient potter skills which have been developed through humankind history and applied them to art creation. Departing from the intrinsic functionality of a wonderful tool, the pottery wheel, he reinvents his use as an artist instrument to elaborate very complex technically sculptures. Nonetheless, his artwork has great simplicity and visual impact. In addition, his neat drawing, with explicit lines and full of details, is an elaborate exercise of descriptive plastic images. Therefore, the decoration of his pottery becomes a visual surprise of rich and luminous colors for the human eye that projects his vision of the world.

    Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 12:00 pm to 8:00 pm.

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  • Kira O’Brien: The Meeting, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 12x15x26cm

    Kira O’Brien: The Meeting, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 12x15x26cm

  • Annie Woodford: Piercing Rim, detail, 2007

  • Fine Lines ’12, Jewelry by Yoshiko Yamamoto / Keiko Gallery, Boston, USA

    Fine Lines 12 exhibition, Jewelry by Yoshiko Yamamoto at Keiko Gallery, Boston, USA

    Fine Lines ’12, Jewelry by Yoshiko Yamamoto / Keiko Gallery, Boston, USA
    March 3 – April 4, 2012

    Opening Reception: March 3, 3:00pm — 6:00pm

    Since no theme was suggested by the gallery for this exhibition, I fully embraced the freedom to choose my own materials and subject matter.

    As I have quite a few collections of copper, monofilament and silver wire, I decided to use the `domestic crafts` of knitting and crocheting to approach the work. The copper wire was already colored and the nylon monofilament was hand-dyed. The 34 gauge colored copper wire has a silky quality that I could treat as soft, fine thread. When tightly crocheted, the material became stiff and I was able to transform its character into a wearable piece. Just like copper wire, monofilament is a marvelous material for knitting and crocheting. The difference is that nylon needs a more taming approach because of its unyielding nature.

    I also decided to make jewelry using wire. One reason is that I wanted to create the jewelry / object based on lines. I used very thin fine silver wire coiled up, then flattered and fused into various shapes that became stronger as I worked. The end product was quite an exciting discovery. The gold wire jewelry required a degree of precision. These works are based on the traditional processes and craftsmanship yet the end product is much different than conventional gold work.

    The four self-portraits are important to me as it expressed my physical dysfunction at that time. Annoyingly, a pinch wouldn’t allow me to go to my studio, so I was looking at myself with both frustration and hope. These figures are spontaneously depictions of my feelings.

    Keiko Gallery is one of the most appreciated art galleries in the US that focuses on Japanese art - from ceramics to the innovative lacquer art, textiles, jewelry and painting.
    View our special feature on Japanese artists from Keiko Gallery, October 2011.

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  • Swept Away: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design / MAD Museum, New York

    Swept Away exhibition: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design at MAD Museum, New York

    Swept Away: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design / MAD Museum, New York
    February 7 - August 12, 2012

    MAD (The Museum of Arts and Design) has explored the intersection of traditional or unusual materials and techniques as viewed through the lens of contemporary art and design in a series of exhibitions that include Radical Lace and Subversive Knitting; Second Lives: Remixing the Ordinary; Slash: Paper Under the Knife; Dead or Alive: Nature Becomes Art; and Otherworldly: Optical Delusions and Small Realities.

    The next investigation into unusual mediums features an international group of artists whose major materials are dust, ashes, dirt, and sand. Swept Away: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design will highlight works that deal with issues such as the ephemeral nature of art and life, the quality and content of memory, issues of loss and disintegration, and the detritus of human existence. Sculptures made from ash by Chinese artist Zhang Huan, life-size sculptures of unfired dirt by American artist James Croak, and works created from city smog by American artist Kim Abeles, among others, illustrate the transformative potential of humble, overlooked, and discarded materials.

    Swept Away Projects
    February 28, 2012 - May 14, 2012

    An extension of the Swept Away exhibition, Swept Away Projects will include a series of “live” installations occurring during the run of the exhibition that will allow audiences to experience and interact with artists and their site-specific installations made of ash, dust, sand, and dirt. The series includes a dust installation by Croatian Igor Eskinja, a sand installation by German artist Elvira Wersche, and a chalk installation by British artist Linda Florence. In some instances, visitor will actually get to sweep away the installations by walking through and touching them, participating in the ephemeral nature of these artists’ output.

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  • Paula Bellacera: Owls, 2012, handbuilt, low-fire clay, glaze, underglaze


  • Debra Fleury: Barnacle, 2011. Dark Stoneware hollow forms fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 12 cm x 11 cm x 8 cm

  • Suzanne Stumpf: Diatoms, detail

  • Deborah Britt: Covered Casserole, 4.5” x 8.5”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011

  • Kjersti Lunde: Vase, 2011 - Porcelain (Photo: Tor Lie)

  • Jorie Johnson (Joi Rae): Confetti Shawls 2008, hand-woven silk fabric, wool. Photo by Toyoda Yuzo.
    / Keiko Gallery - Japanese artists

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