Mark Goudy: Vessel (m61) - 8.5”w x 4”h; handbuilt burnished earthenware, soluble metal salts, fired to cone 04

Mark Goudy: Vessel (m61) - 8.5”w x 4”h; handbuilt burnished earthenware, soluble metal salts, fired to cone 04

Mark Goudy: Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m70) 7”w x 3”h; (m81) 10.5”w x 4”h; (m71) 8”w x 3.5”h

Mark Goudy: Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m70) 7”w x 3”h; (m81) 10.5”w x 4”h; (m71) 8”w x 3.5”h

Mark Goudy: Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m49) 10”w x 5”h; (m50) 10”w x 4.5”h; (m53) 10”w x 4.5”h

Mark Goudy: Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m49) 10”w x 5”h; (m50) 10”w x 4.5”h; (m53) 10”w x 4.5”h

Mark Goudy: Two Pods - closed forms, left: Pod (m91) 11.5”w x 5.5”h; right: Pod (m92) 10”w x 4.5”h; handbuilt burnished earthenware, soluble metal salts, fired to cone 04

Mark Goudy: Two Pods - closed forms, left: Pod (m91) 11.5”w x 5.5”h; right: Pod (m92) 10”w x 4.5”h; handbuilt burnished earthenware, soluble metal salts, fired to cone 04

Amanda Simmons

Amanda Simmons' profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

Amanda Simmons makes kiln formed and cameo engraved glass vessels - tall, sculptural, thin walled columns - from her studio in Corsock. She is fascinated in the forms created by gravity within the kiln, the vessels becoming more complex as she perfects the slumping method. She has worked with glass for the past 9 years, studying at Central St Martin’s School of Art & Design in London, before re-locating to Dumfries & Galloway in 2005.

She combines these techniques with her interest in making marks in glass with diamond point engraving and a diamond wheel lathe. Her work involves many processes of firing, coldworking (working with diamond tools to shape and smooth) and sandblasting. She recently exhibited at the Crafts Council show for contemporary applied arts, COLLECT with Craftscotland and has since become a member of Contemporary Applied Arts in London. A winner of the Gold Award for Innovation, Creativity and potential to export at Origin 2010, she has just returned from a research trip to investigate the applied arts market on the East and West coast of USA funded by the Crafts Council and Uk Trade & Investment.

A keen supporter of the contemporary craft scene, she has just been selected to become the Creative Business Advisor (for Crafts) by Dumfries & Galloway Council, to stimulate, strengthen and support the creative industries sector across the region.

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Johannes Nagel

Johannes Nagel's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

“A vessel has as its reference its own stylistic history and the function. To conserve, or serve out or to present a certain content, is an orientation towards basic human needs. The necessity of producing the form in order to protect contents, meets up with the need to express oneself and to consecrate things and attribute a value to them. From the outset vessels were always designed. The forms emerged from out of the technical capabilities, the practical necessities and a sense for rituals. Rituals are the source of civilization and culture. They bestow a form upon what is lacking in design. A shared meaning develops in them, which goes above and beyond what is merely necessary to life and relates towards what is sublime and greater. From the need to represent and pay homage to this, all art has developed.
The rituals have changed, civilization has brought forth many flowers, art is ever the mirror. The manufacture of vessels is a self-evident cultural technique for all of mankind, and analogue to the role of the figure in sculpture, we can maintain that the ritual is the concrete opposite of the vessel.

And so the „vessel“ can today be a theme, in which function and ritual, our own history and the future may be reflected.
Do rituals relate to something sublime? Can they create a shared meaning? What sort of a function do vessels have today?”

“In the original axiom the form follows the function, as the shape which corresponds to the purpose. The functionality in this work is not related to the potential of a thing to be useful, but rather to the logic involved in its manufacture.
The necessary work steps to make a form mould with which objects can be reproduced in porcelain, are subject to specific preconditions. A sort of three dimensional stereotype has to be made in plaster, which forms a closed volume, or receptacle for the liquid porcelain. The usually many-pieced stereotypes must then be capable of being taken apart, so that the model around which they have arisen, and subsequently the reproduced object shall not be damaged.
I interrupt this process before it is finished and use the stereotype incompletely. The function of (pouring) the form is extended. As a fragment it becomes part of the object and forms a threshold, a border, like the frame which separates the picture from the wall.” Johannes Nagel

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Rika Herbst

Rika Herbst's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

“If my work is to speak I want it to whisper. In this my aim is to create unique pieces for contemplation and enjoyment. Nature is my source of inspiration and delight and it plays a significant role in my work.

The shadows cast by the interplay of light are an integral part of each piece and through this I want to give my work a contemporary feel whilst enhancing the quality of the clay.  Paper porcelain is versatile and allows me to constantly push the boundaries of my work.

I worked with glass initially before turning my full attention to clay, first as a hobbyist and then full-time from my studio which I opened in September, 2003.  During this time I have worked tentatively and experimentally with porcelain and felt it possessed the very qualities I needed to create the desired texture.

Porcelain is a difficult medium in which to work, but I found it a very rewarding challenge.  It has a welcome degree of unpredictability but when the results are good, I feel that our partnership is a successful one.

My work was exhibited at various CSA Regional and National Exhibitions and also showcased at Decorex 2009 in the SA Handmade Collection where I was selected as one of the Ikons and tribute was paid in the field of South African Ceramics. In October 2010 a piece called “Singing Trees” was awarded BEST PORCELAIN PIECE at the biannual CSA National Exhibition.  In April 2011 a piece called “Sickel Bush” was selected for the 9th International Ceramics competition Mino, Japan which will be held in September 2011.  In June 2011 a piece called “Deep forest” was selected as a finalist in the Gyeonggi International CeraMIX Biennale 2011 International Competition in Korea.” Rika Herbst

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