Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

glass

Debra Fleury: Exopool, 2010. Porcelain, glass and glazes. Multiple firings to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere) and cone 6 (neutral atmosphere). Dimensions 18 cm x 11 cm x  15 cm


  • Debra Fleury: Colony, 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and Glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 7 cm x 7 cm x  5 cm

  • Teresa & Helena Jané: Tile (Cónicos), 2008, glass door kitchen Knob, ceramic, handmade flat face, h=6,5x6,5x1,1”

  • Els Wenselaers: Mrs Odeur, 2009, 16 x 33 x 24cm, Ceramics, metal, rubber, glass

  • Kjersti Lunde: Triplets, 2008 - Found object, porcelain and glass (Photo: Tor Lie)

  • Kjersti Lunde: Polarbear, 2010 - found object, porcelain and glass (Photo: Tor Lie)

  • Matt Johnson, Star in a Jar, 2011, Glass, electronics, 6 1/2 x 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches, Pedestal: 40 1/2 x 21 x 21 inches (via)

    Exhibition at Blum & Poe, September 10 - October 22, 2011

  • Baldwin / Guggisberg, Beyond Glass and 20th Century Venetian Glass - Exhibitions at Ariana Museum, Geneva

    Baldwin / Guggisberg, Beyond Glass exhibition - Musee Ariana, Geneva

    Baldwin / Guggisberg, Beyond Glass Exhibition - Ariana Museum, Geneva
    13 October 2011 - 25 March 2012

    The internationally-renowned master glassmakers, Philip Baldwin and Monica Guggisberg have the techniques of glass to develop a fascinating aesthetic of forms and colors sublimated by a mastered articulation of light. The Musee Ariana is devoting a major exhibition to this artistic duo that explires their recent as well as earlier work in order to acknowledge a highly personal poetic universe combining two visions of an inner world.

    20th Century Venetian Glass - a private Genevan collection
    13 October 2011 - 8 April 2012

    This Genevan collection brings together an ensemble of vases, bowls and dishes from the 1920s to the 1990s that illustrated the diversity and the quality of the Venetian glassmaking industry in the 20th century. The majority of the models presented were produces in their hundreds by the Murano glassblowers for companies such as Venini, Cappelin, Barovier, Martinuzzi, Seguso and Barbini. This multiplicity should not disguise the fact that all these pieces are unique.

    And a gift from the Friends of the Musée Ariana:
    an 18th century Nymphenburg porcelain rocaille pot-pouri vase

    Musée Ariana - Musée suisse de la céramique et du verre
    Avenue de la Paix 10
    CH-1202 Geneva, Switzerland
    Tel. +41(0)22 418 54 50
    Fax. +41(0)22 418 54 51

    ariana@ville-ge.ch
    www.ville-ge.ch/ariana

  • Interview with Kawabata Kentaro - Japanese ceramic artist, Keiko Gallery

    Interview with Kawabata Kentaro - Japanese ceramic artist represented by Keiko Gallery, October 2011

    The special feature in partnership with Keiko Gallery includes interviews with 10 Japanese artists represented by Keiko, and many images with their works.

    → This interview is featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue One, Winter 2011-2012.

    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : You were among the first contemporary Japanese artists to combine ceramics and glass when constructing a new work. How did you start to connect these materials?

    Kawabata Kentaro: I wanted to to extract the ingredients from the glaze and embed them into the clay. For example, I tried to use fragments of smashed glass bottles, feldspar, silica stone and beachsand in my white porcelain works, and I did that by mixing these fragments with the glaze. I also wanted to observe the chemical reactions between those materials and the clear glaze after the firing. Throughout these experiences, I was fascinated about the harmony of the different kinds of translucency between glass and white porcelain. I also love touching the unfired clay with bits of glass inserted into it, and I want to get the similar feeling after the firing. I want to constantly develop my work, so I am still looking for new glazes and new kinds of glass as well as interesting materials which go well with my style of work.

    Kawabata Kentaro Japanese Ceramics - Contemporary Ceramics Magazine

    Batista, 2011, Glazed clay, glass, silver, 26” x 18” x 12 1/2”. Photo by Taku Saiki - View his works


    What is your present project and how do you make the pieces? Tell us more about the process.

    Now I am trying to construct a few sculptures using slip casting. After making several different kinds of plaster casts, I connect them. I use my original technique in my newest works, which consists in applying small clay balls and sand on the surface.

    Read More

  • Kawabata Kentaro: Bowl, 2011, Glazed clay, glass, silver, 5” x 5 1/4” x 5”
    / Keiko Gallery - Japanese artists

  • Kawabata Kentaro: Batista, 2011, Glazed clay, glass, silver, 26” x 18” x 12 1/2”. Photo by Taku Saiki.
    / Keiko Gallery - Japanese artists

  • Amanda Simmons

    Amanda Simmons' profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    Amanda Simmons makes kiln formed and cameo engraved glass vessels - tall, sculptural, thin walled columns - from her studio in Corsock. She is fascinated in the forms created by gravity within the kiln, the vessels becoming more complex as she perfects the slumping method. She has worked with glass for the past 9 years, studying at Central St Martin’s School of Art & Design in London, before re-locating to Dumfries & Galloway in 2005.

    She combines these techniques with her interest in making marks in glass with diamond point engraving and a diamond wheel lathe. Her work involves many processes of firing, coldworking (working with diamond tools to shape and smooth) and sandblasting. She recently exhibited at the Crafts Council show for contemporary applied arts, COLLECT with Craftscotland and has since become a member of Contemporary Applied Arts in London. A winner of the Gold Award for Innovation, Creativity and potential to export at Origin 2010, she has just returned from a research trip to investigate the applied arts market on the East and West coast of USA funded by the Crafts Council and Uk Trade & Investment.

    A keen supporter of the contemporary craft scene, she has just been selected to become the Creative Business Advisor (for Crafts) by Dumfries & Galloway Council, to stimulate, strengthen and support the creative industries sector across the region.

    Read More

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