Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition feature

This month we’re making a special feature for the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition, which is on view June 11 through September 18, 2011 at the Denver Art Museum.

It’s the first feature made by Ceramics Now Magazine, and includes images from the Overthrown exhibition and interviews with 10 of the exhibiting artists, plus with the curator of the exhibition. At the end of July, we will also send a special newsletter. Subscribe here to our monthly newsletter.

NAVIGATION (HOW TO):

About Overthrown - About the Overthrown feature on Ceramics Now Magazine
/Overthrown - Images from the exhibition (in High Quality).
/Overthrown_Interviews - Interviews with 10 of the exhibiting artists.
/nameofthe_artist (ex: /Linda_Sormin) - Images with the works of the artist you’re looking for.

Interviews (many will be published at the end of July):

Gwen F. Chanzit - The curator of the exhibition.

Overthrown: Mia Mulvey, Mast Year, 2011. Stoneware, porcelain, cable ties, and pins. Photo by Jeff Wells.

Overthrown: Mia Mulvey, Mast Year, 2011. Stoneware, porcelain, cable ties, and pins. Photo by Jeff Wells.

Overthrown: Paul Sacaridiz, An Incomplete Articulation, 2011. Porcelain, powder-coated aluminum, steel, paper, cut vinyl, and wood. Photo by Jeff Wells.

Overthrown: Paul Sacaridiz, An Incomplete Articulation, 2011. Porcelain, powder-coated aluminum, steel, paper, cut vinyl, and wood. Photo by Jeff Wells.

Paul Carey-Kent’s Top 10 London Shows for April

The most literal kind of figurative is figures themselves: they haven’t always been fashionable but there are plenty around at the moment, ranging from Nancy Spero at the Serpentine to Bill Viola at Blain/Southern to the examples (more to my taste) with which I start, before moving on to works which evoke people less directly… (via)

Paul Carey-Kent’s Top 10 London Shows for April

The most literal kind of figurative is figures themselves: they haven’t always been fashionable but there are plenty around at the moment, ranging from Nancy Spero at the Serpentine to Bill Viola at Blain/Southern to the examples (more to my taste) with which I start, before moving on to works which evoke people less directly… (via)

(Source: saatchiart)