Susan Meyer: Together, 2008, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, wood, video and sound, dimensions variable

Susan Meyer: Together, 2008, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, wood, video and sound, dimensions variable

Susan Meyer: Together, alternative view, 2008, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, wood, video and sound, dimensions variable

Susan Meyer: Together, alternative view, 2008, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, wood, video and sound, dimensions variable

Susan Meyer: Vinyl (detail), 2011, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, aluminum, 35” x 10” x 10”

Susan Meyer: Vinyl (detail), 2011, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, aluminum, 35” x 10” x 10”

Susan Meyer: Vinyl, 2011, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, aluminum, 35” x 10” x 10”

Susan Meyer: Vinyl, 2011, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, aluminum, 35” x 10” x 10”

Susan Meyer: Shaft, detail, 2010, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures and aluminum, 50” x 14” x 14”

Susan Meyer: Shaft, detail, 2010, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures and aluminum, 50” x 14” x 14”

Susan Meyer: Shaft, 2010, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures and aluminum, 50” x 14” x 14”

Susan Meyer: Shaft, 2010, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures and aluminum, 50” x 14” x 14”


Modern Art Oxford presents Teacher of Dance, the first major UK exhibition of the Seoul- and Berlin-based artist Haegue Yang. Yang has developed a distinctive practice of colourful and sensorial installations and sculptures that seek to occupy the spaces where public and private meet and contend with one another. Through her work, Yang discloses narratives, individual portraits and her own sentiments, reflecting the balance of research and intuitive enquiry that underlies her practice. She predominantly uses materials drawn from the domestic realm, yet employs an abstract language to free the work from any narratives that influenced her production process. (via)

Haegue Yang at Modern Art Oxford

Modern Art Oxford presents Teacher of Dance, the first major UK exhibition of the Seoul- and Berlin-based artist Haegue Yang. Yang has developed a distinctive practice of colourful and sensorial installations and sculptures that seek to occupy the spaces where public and private meet and contend with one another. Through her work, Yang discloses narratives, individual portraits and her own sentiments, reflecting the balance of research and intuitive enquiry that underlies her practice. She predominantly uses materials drawn from the domestic realm, yet employs an abstract language to free the work from any narratives that influenced her production process. (via)

Haegue Yang at Modern Art Oxford

(Source: artnotartnot)

Johannes Nagel

Johannes Nagel's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

“A vessel has as its reference its own stylistic history and the function. To conserve, or serve out or to present a certain content, is an orientation towards basic human needs. The necessity of producing the form in order to protect contents, meets up with the need to express oneself and to consecrate things and attribute a value to them. From the outset vessels were always designed. The forms emerged from out of the technical capabilities, the practical necessities and a sense for rituals. Rituals are the source of civilization and culture. They bestow a form upon what is lacking in design. A shared meaning develops in them, which goes above and beyond what is merely necessary to life and relates towards what is sublime and greater. From the need to represent and pay homage to this, all art has developed.
The rituals have changed, civilization has brought forth many flowers, art is ever the mirror. The manufacture of vessels is a self-evident cultural technique for all of mankind, and analogue to the role of the figure in sculpture, we can maintain that the ritual is the concrete opposite of the vessel.

And so the „vessel“ can today be a theme, in which function and ritual, our own history and the future may be reflected.
Do rituals relate to something sublime? Can they create a shared meaning? What sort of a function do vessels have today?”

“In the original axiom the form follows the function, as the shape which corresponds to the purpose. The functionality in this work is not related to the potential of a thing to be useful, but rather to the logic involved in its manufacture.
The necessary work steps to make a form mould with which objects can be reproduced in porcelain, are subject to specific preconditions. A sort of three dimensional stereotype has to be made in plaster, which forms a closed volume, or receptacle for the liquid porcelain. The usually many-pieced stereotypes must then be capable of being taken apart, so that the model around which they have arisen, and subsequently the reproduced object shall not be damaged.
I interrupt this process before it is finished and use the stereotype incompletely. The function of (pouring) the form is extended. As a fragment it becomes part of the object and forms a threshold, a border, like the frame which separates the picture from the wall.” Johannes Nagel

Read More

SKATE 1.0 (2011) by Damon Seeley and Cameron MacNall (link)

An abstract visual skateboard park manifested through an immersive light and sound installation. (via)

Overthrown: Clay Without Limits, on view until September 18

The Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition at the Denver Art Museum is on view until September 18, 2011.

"The scale of the space has pushed all the artists to think big, both physically and conceptually. The exhibition, technically demonstrates the inventive use of such an ancient material, while raising contemporary issues. The works in the exhibition challenge traditional notions of “objectness”, providing a depth of content, and creating a diverse dialogue." Katie Caron

Location: Anschutz Gallery, Level Two, Hamilton Building / Denver Art Museum

→ View images from the exhibition (in High Quality) - /Overthrown
→ Read interviews we’ve made with some of the exhibiting artists -  /Overthrown_Interviews

Interview with Gwen F. Chanzit - The curator of the exhibition.
Interview with Katie Caron and Martha Russo
Interview with John Roloff
Interview with Clare Twomey
Interview with Paul Sacaridiz
Interview with Linda Sormin
Interview with Del Harrow
Interview with Mia Mulvey
Interview with Benjamin DeMott

* The Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition will have an extended feature in the first printed issue of Ceramics Now Magazine (November 2011).