Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

interview

Interview with Suzanne Stumpf, Interactive sculptures - Techniques, April 2012

TECHNIQUES, April 2012: Suzanne Stumpf, Interactive sculptures

/ Read the full interview in Ceramics Now - Issue Two

Ceramics Now Magazine
: The versatility of your work is very inspiring and makes the viewer ask himself whether he should play with your works or just to admire their universe. When did you begin to create such intricate pieces?

Suzanne Stumpf: Thank you for your kind words. I began to create interactive sculptural pieces about 7-8 years ago, after I had been working in clay for about about three years or so. From the outset, drawing the audience in to touch and explore has always been a goal. But also, I have intended for each work to have its own strong essence that invites contemplation/reflection.

Modularity and interactivity are two main characteristics of your work. How much time does it take to complete a new work? Do you make many sketches?

My interactive sculptures generally take many weeks. The germination of an idea and realization of each work can also be a lengthy process, particularly when there are complicated construction or even “engineering” issues involved. I can sometimes spend a couple of months in the “head-scratching” stage and work on other projects while I sort out the steps and best approaches. I do keep a notebook with sketches and notes, but I do not personally find it easy to translate some of these projects onto the page. With a fairly good aptitude for spatial relations, I hold much of the planning in my head initially. Because I build primarily in porcelain, extremely slow drying is key — I cannot emphasize this enough. And, of course, this also adds to an already long creation process.

[]

Suzanne Stumpf Interactive sculptures, Contemporary Ceramics
Spike, 2008, 5.5”h x 8”w x 3” d, wheelthrown and altered porcelain with handbuilt components; black slip and shellac resist; oxidation fired to cone 10 - View her works

Some of your works consist in multi-component pieces that, put together, metamorphose each time in different compositions. Do your Interactive Sculptures illustrate the ludic dimension of art? How important is this element for you?

My answer depends on the tenor of the word “ludic”. Although the mere invitation to rearrange components may seem a playful act and some of my sculptures may even possess qualities of games, the interaction by the audience has never seemed aimless to me. To the contrary, I witness people being extremely thoughtful about what they are creating as they rearrange components. The idea with these works is that there are nearly innumerable permutations that the viewer can create, all of which will reveal different aspects of the sculpture’s essence for contemplation.

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  • Interview with Mark Goudy - New artist, September 2011

    Interview with ceramic artist Mark Goudy - New artist, September 2011

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    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : Your work with ceramics has been active only in the last three years. What did you do before that? Tell us about your first experience with ceramics.

    Mark Goudy: Well, my mother was a potter, starting back in the early 70’s, and so when I was a teenager I was exposed to clay through her work. She had a studio in our basement, with a wheel, kiln, glaze mixing area, etc. I tried throwing on the wheel back then, but I didn’t really connect with the craft aesthetic or the making process during that time. I was more interested in playing music and adventuring outdoors than working with mud.

    Somehow thirty years went by before getting my hands back in the clay again. I ended up studying engineering and enjoyed a twenty-year career in the computer industry (designing graphics chips for companies such as Pixar, Silicon Graphics, and nVidia). It wasn’t until a little while after my mother passed away that my wife Liza had the idea of paying homage to her creative spirit by taking a raku class at our local adult school. Pull pieces directly out of a red-hot kiln and drop them into burning sawdust? …sign me up! It was fun performance art, but it was the building process that really drew me in. I started hand-building and designing systems to create forms that reflected my own sensibilities. More classes followed, and within a couple years I left the virtual world of computer engineering and was spending a lot of time in the clay studio. It was refreshing to be working with such a physical material and in a process where every piece created embodies its own unique identity.


    Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m70) 7”w x 3”h; (m81) 10.5”w x 4”h; (m71) 8”w x 3.5”h


    You usually work with soluble metal salts, that give impressive shapes and patterns. How do you make the pieces?

    I may have been influenced by my experience in computer graphics, where you can render all sorts of interesting objects composed from intersecting curved surfaces, but early on I wanted to get away from the radially symmetric forms that come about from working with the wheel. So I learned about slab construction and ended up making a series of special hump molds (by pouring plaster into stretchy fabric suspended through triangular cutouts in plywood) to shape the clay. These molds enabled me to construct forms out of asymmetric parabolic curved surfaces, which had immediate appeal. My basic process is to shape, and then join these surfaces together to make my rounded vessels. The arcs in these pieces are designed to fit the sweep of my hand as I burnish the surface by rubbing with a smooth stone. For now, I enjoy working in a scale that fits easily into the hands, with forms that feel like waterworn stones.

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  • Interview with Katie Caron and Martha Russo, exhibiting artists at the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition

    Interview with Katie Caron and Martha Russo, exhibiting artists at the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition, Denver Art Museum, July 2011

    The special feature for the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition includes images from the exhibition and interviews with some of the exhibiting artists, plus with the curator. Subscribe.

    Katie Caron:

    Ceramics Now Magazine: Your collaboration transformed into an outstanding piece of contemporary art, Apoptosis. What can you tell us about this collaborative work?

    Working in collaboration with Martha Russo was such a positive and inspiring experience.  We have known each other’s work for years, and always seem to be following similar paths and forms.  It was exciting to work with someone who is so on the same page as you.  For example, the day I did my preliminary sketch of the work on an airplane ride to Detroit, Martha created a small model of the work.  We were shocked to discover, that separate from each other, we both sketched pretty much the same piece.  It was quite eerie! 

    Artist Statement for Apoptosis:
    The site-specific installation connects the museum’s own architecture to a floating swirl of motivated chaos made from a host of ceramic and mixed media materials.  Apoptosis references the genetically directed process of cell self-destruction that makes way for new growth to occur.

    Evoking growth and development, lightness and weight, the work suggests both biological membranes and intertwining industrial lines, conjuring up a tangle of beauty, grotesquerie, buoyancy, and energy.

    The suspended composition has a brace of vantages: the first, a treasure-mesh conceals from the viewer the cryptic viscera of this complex organism, while the second vantage unfolds and unfurls, being pulled by gravity and holding the viewer in a state of suspended wonder.

    Ceramics Now Magazine: Apoptosis looks powerful, twisted, and somehow embrace you to look further. Maybe it’s because of Katie’s previous works that experience illusions, or because of Martha’s work with the physical nature of sculpture?

    Katie Caron : Both of our goals were to engage the viewer to look further, but in different ways. My previous work, as you mentioned, involves the creation of illusions where the viewer is asked to question: what’s real and what’s fabrication?  I am fascinated with our cultures need for escapism, and how we have become addicted to the virtual windows of social media and entertainment.  I hope to tap into this obsession, using theatrical effects to create objects and environments that entice the viewer to look closer and longer.  Asking how virtual objects may compete with virtual media?

    Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis (detail), 2010–11. Photo by Jeff Wells.

    Ceramics Now Magazine: Is this a site-project? Did you experience any challenges? (here you can tell us when did you start working on it, or how was the process, if you had any difficulties with the space, etc.)

    Katie Caron : Selection of the space came first, and then the concepts for the work.  We were interested in using a space that had never been used to show work, a space that was unusual.  The architecture of the Denver Art Museum is so powerfully unique, and so we chose a 30 foot slanted wall as our catalyst.

    I began drawing concept sketches for forms, materials, and use of the space.  I wanted to create an installation that looked like it was co-dependant, both foreign to the space, but dependent on the space for survival.  I compare it to animal architecture; the way some insects parasitically transform man-made spaces to suit their needs. 

    The Denver Art Museum was a huge technical support to our installation.  They provided us with the necessary lifts, equipment, and assistance to stage such a complex work.  Mounting the utility poles took some serious preparation and support.  There are over 200 lit porcelain and paper forms, plus another 3,000 other components mounted to the 30 foot slanted wall with steel rods.  The installation was quite labor intensive to say the least.

    Ceramics Now Magazine: What do you think about the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition?

    Katie Caron: It has been an honor to exhibit with such a prominent group of artists.  Gwen Chanzit, curator for Overthrown: Clay Without Limits, has done an admirable job of selecting and encouraging artists to be ambitious.  The scale of the space has pushed all the artists to think big, both physically and conceptually.  The exhibition, technically demonstrates the inventive use of such an ancient material, while raising contemporary issues.   The works in the exhibition challenge traditional notions of “objectness”, providing a depth of content, and creating a diverse dialogue.

    Ceramics Now Magazine: Where do you get your inspiration from and what motivates you, what do you want to discover through your works?

    Katie Caron: We started off with the idea of a chaotic tangle, which led us to look at all kinds of forms, both from biology and industry.  My personal interest was in power lines.  For years, I have looked upward at utility poles, and found their functional aesthetic inspiring.  After undergoing major spinal surgery in 2009, and looking at x-rays of all the hardware in my back, I began to draw connections between the aesthetics of my hardware and the power lines.  Both aesthetics were determined by utility and appeared parasitic to their host forms. 

    While creating the work, I discovered I was pregnant.  I believe this change in my biology positively affected the work to create an illusion that the work was alive, and powered by an external energy force.  Creating cell-like forms with illuminated interiors became my focus for the work.


    Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis (detail), 2010–11. Photo by Jeff Wells.

    Ceramics Now Magazine: Where can we find you and your works in the next future?

    Katie Caron : We are currently looking for another site for the work on both east and west coasts.  I have two solo shows in 2012 in Denver, at Ice Cube Gallery and Hinterland Gallery, where I look to explore the progression of these ideas and materials further.  You can find my work online at http://www.icecubegallery.com/ , and http://www.katiecaron.com/


    Ceramics Now Magazine: Please give an advice to young ceramic artists.

    Katie Caron: My advice to young ceramic artist is two fold:  First, make, make, make!  Ceramics is such a challenging material, so practice exploring all the ways to manipulate the clay is very important.  Don’t be afraid to fail or let the work lead you.  Too often ceramic artists try to control the clay, rather then using it as a guide.  Second, explore other materials as well!  Do not limit yourself to just clay, but build confidence with other materials, processes and concepts.  The more interdisciplinary your work becomes the more questions it can raise.

    Martha Russo:

    Ceramics Now Magazine: Your collaboration transformed into an outstanding piece of contemporary art, Apoptosis. What can you tell us about this collaborative work?
     
    We both started with something that we wanted to investigate from previous works. For Katie is was light and translucent porcelain and paper and for me it was clay combined with metal. We would work independently in our studios and then show each other what we had done and then make more work off of what each other responded to. Conceptually, we started with the word “tangle” and sent each other a flurry of images of any kind of tangle.  Our “image swap” generated a rolling progression of ideas and possibilities. What began to resonate with both of us were notions of electricity and wires, morphing cell production, masses of jumbled objects, and much more. We tested different groupings of the pieces in our studios and got a sense of how to make them physically cling to the wall.  With time our ideas began to coalesce into a hazy notion of what the thousands and thousands of pieces would form.  Because of the enormous scale (30 feet high and 25 feet wide) we really did not know how the installation would work until we put it up in the museum. I think the most important thing about our collaboration is that Katie and I gave each other complete freedom. We deeply trusted each other.  Working with Katie has and continues to be a complete joy and one of incessant wonder and possibility.  I feel infinitely fortunate to know and work with her.  The future is BIG.
     
    Ceramics Now Magazine: Apoptosis looks powerful, twisted, and somehow embraces you to look further. Maybe it’s because of Katie’s previous works that experience illusions, or because of Martha’s work with the physical nature of sculpture?
     
    Martha Russo : I think Apoptosis is a wonderful hybrid of our aesthetics, ways of working, trust in the unknown, and ideas about art.
     
    I just learned of a new word, phototaxis, which means that light compels one to move closer to an object.  I think the mystery and lure of the glowing porcelain forms and the hovering translucent paper spheres draws the viewer in closer to decipher the mass and weight of the cascade of objects, the jumble of metal burned into the clay coupled with the odd beauty and decisive scale of the utility poles. I think Katie and I share the fascination and try to mind the psychology of what intrigues someone to stay with a work of art.


     
    Ceramics Now Magazine: Is this a site-project? Did you experienced any challenges? (here you can tell us when did you start working on it, or how was the process, if you had any difficulties with the space, etc.).
     
    Martha Russo : Because of so many conceptual crossovers and interests in experimenting with materials, Katie and I toyed with the idea of some day doing some work together. When we were invited to the show, separately, the thought of having such a huge gallery space seemed like a great opportunity to collaborate.  After we decided to work together, we picked the space, which had not been used before to exhibit work. The prospects of such an unusual space set us in motion. I was most interested in creating some kind of wave of objects that would appear to have tumbled down the slanted thirty foot wall and Katie had the brilliant idea to connect an existing free-standing gallery wall to the slanted wall with some sort of floating forms.

    The turn-around time for the show was about eleven months, so we had no time to waste. The time pressure really made us work quickly and intuitively while also solving a plethora of technical challenges like using translucent porcelain, learning how to cast and create forms with paper, and coaxing the clay to co-mingle with lots of different kinds of metal. The process was all about discovery - brilliant fun and incessant challenges.  With a very carefully orchestrated plan, full support from the Denver Art Museum every step of the way, and an extremely smart, professional, and adventurous installation crew, the knitting together of the thousands of forms went off really well. Each day brought different challenges and unknowns and after two solid weeks of installing, Apoptosis came into focus.
     
    Ceramics Now Magazine: What do you think about the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition?
     
    Martha Russo: The exhibit, curated by Dr. Gwen Chanzit, is smart, diverse, beautiful, and eye-opening. With every turn in the gallery, there is something really compelling to experience and to ponder.  The show gives a fresh look into the contemporary art world at artists who use the clay process in some innovative and inventive ways.  Being included in the exhibit has not only been and continues to be a great honor but has opened up a breath of possibilities for the future.
     
    Ceramics Now Magazine: Where do you get your inspiration from and what motivates you, what do you want to discover through your works?
     
    Martha Russo: Here is the short list:
     
    not knowing
    cellular complexity and simplicity
    a burl on a tree
    logs jammed in a river bend
    the odd hardware and connective gear on utility poles
    the periodic table
    the miracle of systems in the body
    how my kids explore things
    goo and glue and Dragon Skin
    my husband, Joe, the scientist telling me about how chemicals interact
    how to negotiate with the water content of clay
    being a pyro
    the light of the moon eking out behind the clouds

    Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis, 2010–11. Photo by Jeff Wells.
     
    Ceramics Now Magazine: Where can we find you and your works in the next future?
     
    Martha Russo: In the upcoming year, I may be in exhibitions in Seattle, Denver, and Aspen. I am in an art collective, called “Artnauts, which is a group of artist put together by Dr. George Rivera and Garrison Roots, from University of Colorado, Boulder. This year we have shows in Chile, Cuba, Brazil, and two venues in the Middle East.  To see more of my work please go to: http://www.martharussostudio.com/
     
    Ceramics Now Magazine: Please give an advice to young ceramic artists.

    Martha Russo : WORK WORK WORK and WORK SOME MORE. Making anything takes a long time. Staying in the studio and staying with a new idea or process simply takes time, concentration, and focus. Avoid editing away ideas too early. Give everything a long incubation period with unfettered flurries of making and then look at the work carefully.  And lastly, be open to every possible material and process in order to bring an idea to fruition.  Plus have fun.

    ——————————————————————-

    Apoptosis
    2010-2011
    Porcelain, paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted tools, steel and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents, electrical cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper, beeswax.

    Apoptosis is a floating swirl of motivated chaos that inhabits the museum’s architecture.  The cascading mass of morphing cell-like forms evokes growth and development, lightness and weight, and connects biological membranes with intertwining industrial lines. With a cacophony of sculptural forms, colors, textures, cables, utility poles, and lights it conjures up a tangle of beauty, grotesquerie, buoyancy, and energy.  Our goal is to create a state of suspended wonder.


    Katie Caron
    Born 1978 in Manchester, Connecticut; lives in Lafayette and works in Lakewood, Colorado

    Katie Caron graduated summa cum laude from Boston University in 2000, and received an MFA in ceramics from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 2009. Her work has been in national exhibitions such as Breakdown at Guggenheim Gallery: Chapman University, California, Reinventing Beauty at the Museum of New Art: MONA, Michigan, and Elastic Authenticity at the Morean Art Center in St. Petersburg, Florida.   Caron is presently an Assistant Professor in Fine Arts & Art Education at Rocky Mountain College of Art & Design, and a member of Ice Cube Gallery.   She lives with her husband in Lafayette, CO.

    I am fascinated by escapism: how and why our senses transport us to imaginary worlds, how electronic media change the way we feel the present moment and how it can mediate our lives. Through film and theatrical effects, I immerse viewers in the experience of an illusion—what’s real and what’s fabrication?
    These new worlds are uncanny and mysterious. I explore how unconscious reactions shape emotion; how certain spaces, sounds, and objects may provoke fear or incite wonder.


    Martha Russo
    Born 1962 in Milford, Connecticut; lives in Ward and works in Lakewood, Colorado

    Martha Russo earned a BA in developmental biology and psychology from Princeton University,1985.  Formerly a world-class athlete, she suffered a career-ending injury in 1984 while preparing for the Los Angeles Olympic Games.  After her recovery from surgery, attracted to the physical nature of sculpture, Russo studied studio arts in Florence, Italy, and continued at Princeton University.  In 1995 she earned her MFA at the University of Colorado, Boulder.  Martha is represented by Allan Stone Gallery, New York, New York and Ron Judish, Denver, Colorado.  Martha also teaches at Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design, Lakewood, Colorado.

    Before children have the language and cognitive skills to name an object, they explore the world with all of their senses.  For instance, a chair is not a “chair” but rather something to climb on, to crawl under, and, perhaps, even to lick.  With the acquisition of language and the awareness of the purpose of something, the investigations dwindle and the senses simmer. My hope is that people approach my work and stay with it because they are not quite sure what it is:  What are the forms?  What are they made out of?  How are they suspended in space?  I make abstract organic sculptures to give people a place to let language and purpose slip away and to allow the senses to frolic, to delight, to muse.

    Visit Katie Caron and Martha Russo's websites.

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    Interview by Vasi Hirdo - Editor of Ceramics Now Magazine with help from Miruna Pria.

  • Interview with Jim Kraft - Ceramic Technique, June-July 2011

    Interview with ceramic artist Jim Kraft - Ceramic Technique, June-July 2011

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    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : What was the starting point in your investigation (research) with earthenware clay?

    Jim Kraft: When I set up my studio I bought an electric kiln which satisfied  my needs as I was interested in making objects that were not meant to be functional or to be displayed outdoors.  I did not want to cover the clay with a glaze, I wanted the earthen colors of the clay to be prominent.

    In what techniques do you usually work and what materials do you use?

    My work is solely hand-built. I roll  25# slabs of clay by hand. I use a clay extruder to make my coils .I imbed dry colorants in both the slabs and the coils. I throw dry colorants on the ware boards as I roll the slabs, the moist clay picks up the dry materials.  Depending on what series I’m working on I build the vessel forms using cut up or torn slab pieces and twisted off sections of coils. I use earthenware clay in either a buff or a red color.  After the piece is bisqued I brush on a black/brown slip, I let that dry and the next day I wipe it off.  It stays in the cracks and crevasses.  Then I brush on a clear glaze.  I let that dry and wipe it off the next day.  I leave enough to give it life but not shine.  I want the surface of the clay to absorb light not reflect it. This is a building up of the surface, layering, as you might do in print making or painting. Then I fire it a final time.

    Cord 5 - View Jim Kraft’s works

    What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces? Tell us more about the process.

    Currently I’m building vessel forms using short torn pieces of clay coils and stacking them, like cord wood.  The end of each torn piece faces the viewer.  It’s like building with wine bottle corks or cigar butts, but end up looking more like natural, organic objects such as bird nests, bee hives or tree stumps.  The trick is finding the place where they don’t look like any of those things but allude to any and all of them. However I always want them to read as vessel forms, something that contains.

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  • Photographer Jonathan Vanderweit - EXTRA!, May 2011

    EXTRA!, May 2011: Jonathan Vanderweit

    Interview by Vasi Hîrdo for Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two

    Ceramics Now Magazine: Tell us who you are and what you do.

    My name is Jonathan and I make photographs in Denver, CO, USA. I have been shooting for about ten years, but have really begun to focus on the craft of photography since early 2010. I also work as a videographer and creative director for a small nonprofit organization here in Denver.

    Jonathan Vanderweit monocle photo

    What is your present photography project, what’s its history and how do relate to it?

    Jonathan Vanderweit: My work focuses on the exploration of the world around us with specific regard to the interaction between humans and the natural environment. This means finding areas where nature has begun to reclaim the world of people, which here  in the US often happens in formerly industrial/manufacturing areas as well as at the fringes of cities and towns. I love finding where our maintenance crews haven’t caught up or which taken on a kind of serendipitous equilibrium between the forces of creation and ruin.

    My next two photo projects are extensions on this theme. One is a series of portraits of people who wear glasses or contact lenses. The photos will be displayed in pairs, the left a normal portrait of the subject in their glasses and the right will be a shot without them.  The image on the right will have the focus corrected to account for the person’s natural visual acuity, with a different effect for each person depending if he/she is nearsighted, farsighted, or has astigmatism.

    The second project will use some of the locations I have discovered over the last year–walls, doorways, stairs, the urban features of Denver–as settings for exquisitely-dressed floating protagonists. These photos will explore the habitation of spaces that have previously been considered industrial or austere by inhabiting them with individuals bursting with style and weightlessness. Gven the labored past of many of these dwellings, one would expect that they be drab and deserted. In fact the opposite is proving true, homes in lofts and warehouses have strong draw for creative people and have become a highly desired place of residence.

    Jonathan Vanderweit monocle photo


    How it all started? What was your first camera and what devices do you have now?

    My first camera was an Olympus OM-1 with a 50mm lens, which was a gift from my father when I was around 15 years old. Today, I primarily shoot with a  Nikon D700 and I also have a Nikon FE2 that I use when I don’t feel like carrying much, as well as a Mamiya RZ67 medium format system which is huge and exquisite serves as a constant reminder of what a camera actually does.

    The instant feedback of shooting digital has accelerated my learning curve and gives me loads of flexibility when processing my images, but I will continue to shoot film for the sheer fact that it feels like creating a real thing (which makes me shoot more slowly and thoughtfully), and that the look of many film types is hard to duplicate digitally.

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  • 
Leivos is a website that features interviews and works of new and recognized illustrators and graphic artists. Shyra & Veronika are the editors.

Super talented illustrator and wonderful person from Barcelona Javier González Pacheco has found time in his busy schedule and answered our questions.
L: What drew you to illustration in the first place? Where did all begin?
J G.P: All started when my mother, when I was only a baby, showed me for first time in my life a lot of color pencils in the floor, my small hands went directly for catch the first color of my life and draw a lines, this color was the yellow, and since this time, I have a special connexion with it.
L: Describe your personal style in 3 words.
J G.P: Free squares brushstrokes

L: Your works have stunning kind of “golden inner light”! What methods do you use to apply colors?
J G.P: How I said before, I have a obsession with this “golden inner light” as you say, this yellows, this hot colors, like burning sometimes, is a pleasure for me use it, I need it, so, in the mayority of my works, you will can see always a detail in hot colors, even if is a cold illustration, sure that will have a little red brushstroke in some zone for example, I like the contrast between cold and hot colors, because I feel how the eyes and mind vibrate with this play of contrast, so infact, my method of apply colors is only painting in totally instinct way, in all my life I has been a totally observer of the nature, because is the best teacher for use the colors, you have only to see a sunset for know it, or see how some animals have a amazing mix of colors, like some frogs, some insects, the wings of a butterfly for example, or the great giant color pattern of a lot of flowers, all around you will be your teacher in the use of colors, lights, shadows, forms and much more.
 So, with all this knowledge acquired with the observation, I try to do it in my creations too, I like to work traditional and digital and I like to mix both disciplines too, when I do it in traditional style I use watercolors, acrylics, ink, graphite of different hardnesses, calibrated markers tip, pens etc, when I work in digital I use Photoshop, creating my own brushes and textures, and sometimes, what I said before, I mix traditional and digital, painting a base in the old fashioned way, scanning thousands of things in search of textures, mixing traditional strokes with digital strokes, I try to create confusion for the people don´t know what is digital and what is traditional. 

L: Do you love to travel? What is your typical day like in Barcelona?
J G.P: Yes, I like to travel, is a way of learn too about all, for the life, for be good with myself and for inspiration, a travel always activate me the desires of paint, I can´t stop of do what I love, so I will have always a moment for draw something, even in the corner of a paper napkin of a pub, I will have the necessity of draw some stupid thing!.  My days in Barcelona are very simples, I like a lot to be with my friends that, as me, they like, value and love the art in all the giant aspects that have this world, so for me, I enjoy of a good afternoon of talk, drink a beer in good company and eat some “tapas”!, but the most important for me is walk, I need to do it, because is my moment of me with myself, looking the city, the lights in the builds, the persons, their expresions, as I say before, all around me is my teacher for create, so this is my moment of study and learn, I feel very good after a good walk, I feel more clear my mind and I like to thought the next works and ideas while I´m walking. 
L: Who inspire you - some famous people or maybe your friends? 
J G.P: I love the expressionist painters like Klimt, for his use of the decorative elements with the human forms, Egon Schiele for his style doing the anatomy and faces and his strokes, and the mix of colors of Kandinsky, a lot of cómic artist too like Bill Sienkiewicz, Ashley Wood, James Jean, Sean Phillips, Brian Bolland, Alex Ross, Teddy Kristiansen, Tim Bradstreet, Travis Charest, Dave Mc Kean, Mignola, Drew Struzan, John Bolton, Scott Hampton, P. Craig Rusell, Frank Miller, Miguelanxo Prado, Dave Johnson, Dave Gibbons and much more, and of course, I admire great friends and amazing artists  Bruno Redondo, Iban Coello and  Sergio Sandoval.

L: What can we expect from you in the nearest future?Any projects?
J G.P: The life of an illustrator is always a surprise!, anyway, in this period, I´m concentrated in editorial works.
L: If you were a superhero, what would your special powers be?
J G.P: For me the best power would be teleportation:
“All the day painting, so tired, ehmm, let´s go to Miami Beach! (teleportation now!)”“I have to draw a lion, let´go to Africa! (teleportation now!)”“I need a break!,  would be a pleasure feel free sensations in Big Canyon, let´s go! (teleportation now!)”Yeah!
Thank you Javier!
http://javiergpacheco.blogspot.com/
→ Like Leivos on Facebook.

    Leivos is a website that features interviews and works of new and recognized illustrators and graphic artists. ShyraVeronika are the editors.

    Super talented illustrator and wonderful person from Barcelona Javier González Pacheco has found time in his busy schedule and answered our questions.

    L: What drew you to illustration in the first place? Where did all begin?

    J G.P: All started when my mother, when I was only a baby, showed me for first time in my life a lot of color pencils in the floor, my small hands went directly for catch the first color of my life and draw a lines, this color was the yellow, and since this time, I have a special connexion with it.

    L: Describe your personal style in 3 words.

    J G.P: Free squares brushstrokes

    L: Your works have stunning kind of “golden inner light”! What methods do you use to apply colors?

    J G.P: How I said before, I have a obsession with this “golden inner light” as you say, this yellows, this hot colors, like burning sometimes, is a pleasure for me use it, I need it, so, in the mayority of my works, you will can see always a detail in hot colors, even if is a cold illustration, sure that will have a little red brushstroke in some zone for example, I like the contrast between cold and hot colors, because I feel how the eyes and mind vibrate with this play of contrast, so infact, my method of apply colors is only painting in totally instinct way, in all my life I has been a totally observer of the nature, because is the best teacher for use the colors, you have only to see a sunset for know it, or see how some animals have a amazing mix of colors, like some frogs, some insects, the wings of a butterfly for example, or the great giant color pattern of a lot of flowers, all around you will be your teacher in the use of colors, lights, shadows, forms and much more.

     So, with all this knowledge acquired with the observation, I try to do it in my creations too, I like to work traditional and digital and I like to mix both disciplines too, when I do it in traditional style I use watercolors, acrylics, ink, graphite of different hardnesses, calibrated markers tip, pens etc, when I work in digital I use Photoshop, creating my own brushes and textures, and sometimes, what I said before, I mix traditional and digital, painting a base in the old fashioned way, scanning thousands of things in search of textures, mixing traditional strokes with digital strokes, I try to create confusion for the people don´t know what is digital and what is traditional. 


    L: Do you love to travel? What is your typical day like in Barcelona?

    J G.P: Yes, I like to travel, is a way of learn too about all, for the life, for be good with myself and for inspiration, a travel always activate me the desires of paint, I can´t stop of do what I love, so I will have always a moment for draw something, even in the corner of a paper napkin of a pub, I will have the necessity of draw some stupid thing!.
      My days in Barcelona are very simples, I like a lot to be with my friends that, as me, they like, value and love the art in all the giant aspects that have this world, so for me, I enjoy of a good afternoon of talk, drink a beer in good company and eat some “tapas”!, but the most important for me is walk, I need to do it, because is my moment of me with myself, looking the city, the lights in the builds, the persons, their expresions, as I say before, all around me is my teacher for create, so this is my moment of study and learn, I feel very good after a good walk, I feel more clear my mind and I like to thought the next works and ideas while I´m walking. 

    L: Who inspire you - some famous people or maybe your friends? 

    J G.P: I love the expressionist painters like Klimt, for his use of the decorative elements with the human forms, Egon Schiele for his style doing the anatomy and faces and his strokes, and the mix of colors of Kandinsky, a lot of cómic artist too like Bill Sienkiewicz, Ashley Wood, James Jean, Sean Phillips, Brian Bolland, Alex Ross, Teddy Kristiansen, Tim Bradstreet, Travis Charest, Dave Mc Kean, Mignola, Drew Struzan, John Bolton, Scott Hampton, P. Craig Rusell, Frank Miller, Miguelanxo Prado, Dave Johnson, Dave Gibbons and much more, and of course, I admire great friends and amazing artists  Bruno Redondo, Iban Coello and  Sergio Sandoval.

    L: What can we expect from you in the nearest future?Any projects?

    J G.P: The life of an illustrator is always a surprise!, anyway, in this period, I´m concentrated in editorial works.

    L: If you were a superhero, what would your special powers be?

    J G.P: For me the best power would be teleportation:

    “All the day painting, so tired, ehmm, let´s go to Miami Beach! (teleportation now!)”
    “I have to draw a lion, let´go to Africa! (teleportation now!)”
    “I need a break!,  would be a pleasure feel free sensations in Big Canyon, let´s go! (teleportation now!)”
    Yeah!

    Thank you Javier!

    http://javiergpacheco.blogspot.com/

    → Like Leivos on Facebook.

    (Source: leivos)

  • Rery (likes) - EXTRA!, April 2011

    EXTRA!, April 2011: Rery (likes)

    Interview by Vasi Hîrdo

    What is your name and who are you in real life?

    Rery (likes): I am Rery. I was born in Taipei, grew up in Montreal and am now living and working in Paris as a freelance illustrator.

    In what techniques do you usually work, do you make sketches first?

    I use my pen tablet to make illustrations on Illustrator, but have always a sketches book with me so that I can draw down the unexpected ideas. I like the nearly perfect control and the multiple possibilities of the digital art, as much as the spontaneity and the freedom of the hand drawing.

    La pénultième (2010) / Digital collage with Jay Maude’s photograph

    What is your present project and what’s its history? Do you plan to make an exhibition?

    Currently, I’m working with a friend on a website: ARTchipel.com. It’s a collaboration project that wishes to promote artists coming from around the world.

    I’ve only exhibited my works few times in the past. I am preparing to do more in the future, psychologically and in terms of works.

    How it all started? Do you remember your first works?

    I make Hans Hartung’s words mine: “Everything we feel deeply must be expressed.” I am a very visual person and have always felt the need to express my emotion and state of mind through images.

    My early drawings were heavily influenced by manga. With time and various encounters, the evolution comes subtly but naturally. Today, my works are very different from the ones before, but they keep the simple lines and expressiveness of my first drawings.

    ☼.☼ (2011)

    Tell us more about your art blog (rerylikes) and what plans you have for it.

    I started my art blog to share things I like with my living-far-away-twin-sister. With time, this (almost) daily practice builds up a digital memory gathering things that move me and help me in my personal research.

    It is a beautiful surprise that so many people share the same love for art with me. And thanks to this blog, I’ve met virtually many great artists and curators. I will certainly continue to nurture this love and sharing, hopefully with more and more people.

    La lectrice (2011)

    Visit the artist’s website and her art blog.

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  • Interview with Cynthia Lahti - Recognized artist, April 2011

    Interview with ceramic artist Cynthia Lahti - Spotlight- Recognized artist, April 2011

    Subscribe to our monthly newsletter if you want to read more interviews with ceramic artists.

    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces?

    Cynthia Lahti: I am working on several ideas right now: people wearing disguises, busts of elegant women, and male/ female couples. These are all subjects that have always interested me but that I have never fully explored.

    I am also continuing to use some of the broken piece from my discarded sculptures that I have saved. This idea started in 2010 with he creation of the sculpture Vault Alarm that was composed of broken sculptures. In my current exploration of this idea, I am experimenting with combining the broken pieces together to form a new figure. This idea came from realizing that when I destroying unsuccessful sculptures, body pieces that remained were often extremely interesting to me and I could not discard them. I am finally inspired to see how they look combined together and I have been very excited by the results.


    Socks - View her works

    In what technique do you usually work and what materials do you use?

    I am focusing on hand-built ceramic sculptures of human and animal figure(s). I like to use a wide variety of clay bodies, my favorite being porcelain.  I have used all types of firing techniques to achieve the final surface treatment on the pieces. I am most excited but the results I have been getting from cone 10 soda and salt firings and low fire raku.

    What was the starting point in your investigation?

    I start by finding images of figures that intrigue me in older books and magazine, I then do drawing of the images and finally sculptures, inspired by these drawings, are create out of clay.

    My art is influenced by human artifacts from ancient times to the present, as well as by my personal experiences and emotions. Like the varied objects and images I draw on for inspiration - from 1940s knitting catalogs and outsider art, to Native American cedar carvings and Degas’ sculptures of dancers—my artworks force an explanation of reality and compel viewers to connect to a larger human experience. Currently I am focusing on ceramic sculpture based on expressive images of the figure I find in a variety of source materials.

    Read More

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