Els Wenselaers: Racemouse, 2009, 38 x 40 x 38 cm, Ceramics, leather, metal, wood, leather case with painted text on it

Els Wenselaers: Racemouse, 2009, 38 x 40 x 38 cm, Ceramics, leather, metal, wood, leather case with painted text on it

Els Wenselaers: Human Hybrid with Racemouse, 2009, 25 x 80 x 30 cm, Ceramics, white glaze, slibs, leather, rubber, metal

Els Wenselaers: Human Hybrid with Racemouse, 2009, 25 x 80 x 30 cm, Ceramics, white glaze, slibs, leather, rubber, metal

Interview with Takeda Asayo - Japanese textile artist, Keiko Gallery

Interview with Takeda Asayo - Japanese textile artist represented by Keiko Gallery, October 2011

The special feature in partnership with Keiko Gallery includes interviews with 10 Japanese artists represented by Keiko, and many images with their works.

→ The interviews will be published in the first printed issue of Ceramics Now Magazine. Pre-order Issue nr. 1 - Winter 2011-2012 or subscribe for one year.

Ceramics Now Magazine : You are one of the most appreciated textile artists in Japan, with many awards for your purses. When did you start working with textiles?

Takeda Asayo: I started making purses in 1970 and had my first solo exhibition in a gallery in 1983.

Do you remember how much you asked for the first bag you created to be sold?

It was about JPY 12000 (=$150). That purchase made me confident and gave me the power to go forward.

Takeda Asayo Japanese Textile artist - Ceramics Now

Sculpturesque Purse, 2009, Cotton, leather - View her works

More than 30 years ago, you established your own independent studio for the production of fabric sculpture and bags. What can you tell us about the studio, how it evolved in time?

I would like to create the usable sculpture rather than just looking. I believe that this new concept appeals to many people, so I have been able to continue my style until now.


Your works have an amazing and innovative design which distinguish itself. You carefully chose the fabric material, and you try to make your works to be comfortable and complimentary to the human body. Doing all that, you find a balance between functionality and design. How?

Our body of work consists in many curved lines, so I always consider that the shape and lines of my purses can harmonize with our body line. I prefer to improvise rather than using the fixed patterns. That makes my purses comfortable to wear.

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Jorie Johnson (Joi Rae): Olympia Series Jacket 2006, wool, leather. Photo by Kobayashi You.I love making asymmetrical collars and also working the edge of a piece to produce a soft “washi” paper effect rather than a hard cut edge. Here also, the bits of color were laid between the black wool base and the white top layer before the felting process began to help emphasize the collars and jacket edges. My influence came from the Central Asian nomadic herders coats but with a little Joi Rae Textiles twist. Stitched pocket flap and felt rope closure. / Keiko Gallery - Japanese artists

Jorie Johnson (Joi Rae): Olympia Series Jacket 2006, wool, leather. Photo by Kobayashi You.
I love making asymmetrical collars and also working the edge of a piece to produce a soft “washi” paper effect rather than a hard cut edge. Here also, the bits of color were laid between the black wool base and the white top layer before the felting process began to help emphasize the collars and jacket edges. My influence came from the Central Asian nomadic herders coats but with a little Joi Rae Textiles twist. Stitched pocket flap and felt rope closure.
/ Keiko Gallery - Japanese artists