Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

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Issue Two - Ceramics Now Magazine

Ceramics Now Magazine’s Issue Two introduces the work of over 35 international artists, beginning with Ken Eastman, Kimberly Cook, Patricia Sannit, Marianne McGrath, Annie Woodford, Suzanne Stumpf or Ruth Power, and continuing with a special feature on Romanian ceramic artists, and a preview feature for Copenhagen Ceramics. The issue also inaugurates Ceramics Now’s new Review category.

/ Cover: Ken Eastman, Hold your own. Media: Stoneware with painted coloured slips and oxides. Dimensions: 14.9 x 13 x 21.3 inches / 38 x 33 x 54 cm.

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FULL CONTENT
Ken Eastman, Brian Kakas, Patricia Sannit, Steve Belz, Kimberly Cook, Annie Woodford, Jenni Ward, Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso, Liliana Folta, Deborah Britt, Cindy Billingsley, Paula Bellacera, Teresa & Helena Jané, Virginie Besengez, Els Wenselaers, Walter B. Stephen (review by Jill Beute Koverman), Cybele Rowe and Lauren Ari (review by Daniel Fleischmann), Allison Luce (review by James Romaine), Tom Hubbard (review by Roxana Ciobanu), Ceramics Now Exhibition (review by Vasi Hîrdo), Max Cheprack, Suzanne Stumpf, Marianne McGrath, Kathy Pallie, Debra Fleury, Bente Skjøttgaard, Bodil Manz, Arina Ailincăi, Marta Jakobovits, Romana Mateiaş, Aniela Ovadiuc, Oriana Pelladi, Eugenia Pop, Cristina Popescu Russu, Simona Tănăsescu, Bogdan Teodorescu, Anti-Utopias.

Read more about this issue.

  • Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso

    Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso Contemporary Chinese Ceramics

    Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

    “The concept of my recent work is about form, and it grows from my curiosity about space; it investigates the relationship between two objects and it questions how we should make the landscape to react to man-made object. In my work I aim to explore that joyful, interesting, and mysterious relationship between objects and to create compositions with complex configurations though simple and unexpected components.

    It is my intention to trigger the viewer to look closer and rediscover the ordinary, yet unfamiliar relationships that exists everywhere within all objects and human beings. Through sensations, communication and exploration, both objects and humans are able to obtain appropriate space and attention. I hope my work is able to look into this perception of the relationships, but more importantly - to enrich this relationship and establish a sense of place.” Kwok-Pong Tso

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  • Kimberly Cook: Superstition of Security, 33.5” x 23” x 16”, stoneware, glaze, mason stain, gold luster, 2011

  • David D. Gilbaugh

    David D. Gilbaugh Contemporary Ceramics

    David D. Gilbaugh's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

    “Through creating and teaching others how to make “Treepots” and “Tectonic Sculptures,” I have dedicated my artistic efforts in ceramics to exploring life and the irony of renewal through death. Trees are the primary subject of my work and human emergence is its’ theme. Through this creative work I engage the interrelationship between humanity and nature. 

    I focus on trees because I have a natural love of them from my youth. As a child I spent my summers with my brother roaming the woods of northern Illinois, and as an adolescent I spent them backpacking the forests of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Observing the tree excites my creative expression because it demonstrates the promise of renewal in the events of birth, the processes of aging, and the inevitability and promise of new life through death and decay. In this way life continuously takes on evolved and more beautiful forms through both creation and evolution. Both are proven simultaneously in the cycle of life. Evidence of this is shown most brilliantly to me in the life cycle of trees and I speak of it most effectively through my art in the medium of clay.” David Gilbaugh

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  • Kathy Pallie: Fire – Passion. Earthenware, glazes, 20”H x 13”L x 11”D, 2011

  • Kathy Pallie: Water – emotion. Earthenware, glazes, 12”H x 13”L x 5”D, 2011

  • Interview with Connie Norman - Spotlight, November 2011

    Interview with ceramic artist Connie Norman - Spotlight, November 2011

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    → The full interview with Connie Norman is featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue One / Winter 2011-2012.

    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : Text and pattern is seen everywhere on your works; they make a fantastic rhythm and enhance the forms. When did you start to use text on your works?

    Connie Norman: My current style using text started years ago when I was making mixed media sculptures that were mostly clay integrating text. I gave myself the challenge to make something esthetically pleasing. What I wanted to do was -to be able to tell a story with pots. I suddenly had the revelation of incorporating the text onto my pots. But it is very ironic that I use words on my work, because I have always struggled with writing. And I still do! When I was working in sculpture I only used single words, but now I have expanded to phrases. 

    You recently came home from Ethiopia. What did you experience there? Tell us your impressions.

    My journey to Ethiopia started approximately four years ago, when my husband and I started the adoption process for our son Vander. In 2009 our permanent relationship with the country of Ethiopia started, we traveled to Addis Ababa, to pick up our son. As the days, months and years went by; I realized I wanted to give back to the country that gave us our son. I started looking for a way to go back to Ethiopia and volunteer. I went to Ethiopia this past July for three weeks. I worked with three organizations, One Child Campaign, Vision on Africa and Mission Ethiopia.
    Connie Norman working with Tigist, the master potter of Vision on Africa.I worked with women to help restore their dignity who are HIV positive and who have leprosy, and women who are destitute. Through the language of clay we were able to communicate, laugh and be with each other without a common language.
    The women of Mission Ethiopia are HIV positive and suffer from leprosy; these women are considered outcasts and unemployable. Women like these and their children, spend their days searching the garbage dumps for food. Now, these women make pit fired beads, which are fired on the ground in an open fire.Currently they are able to feed their children and themselves.

    I sat with the women much like an old fashioned quilting circle, they showed me how to roll the beads in my palm and decorate each bead. While we were making beads their children ran in, out and played outside with meager toys like old tires, but were always smiling. 
    Vision of Africa is an organization that is helping destitute women in many diverse ways, they provide medical care for mothers and children are educated on contraceptives, sponsorship programs of orphans, and of course they train women to be potters. Ceramics in Ethiopia is a very hands’ on process  I was asked to help the women with their production process, but I felt like I learned more from them, than they learned from me. Tigist, the master potter gently guides the women from mixing the clay they collect from other regions of Ethiopia, to hand building bowls, vases, spice cellars, and coffee pots, and much more. While I was there, Tigist did a pit fire with me. I was amazed at her skill; she laid the green pots near the fire and slowly moved them into the fire ring. Then just like in American raku, she threw the pots in some dried leaves for a post reduction process. 

    Connie Norman in Ethiopia with boys from one of the orphanages in Addis

    "Me in Ethiopia with boys from one of the orphanages in Addis Ababa.  I caught my frist chicken."

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  • Els Wenselaers: Mrs Odeur, 2009, 16 x 33 x 24cm, Ceramics, metal, rubber, glass

  • Els Wenselaers: The Brain Controller, 2009, 25 x 29 x 16 cm, Ceramics, used materials

  • » Buy Issue nr. 1 of Ceramics Now Magazine

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    Arthur Gonzalez’s work is on the cover of the Ceramics Now Magazine Winter 2011-2012 issue, introducing an amazing interview about his work. The issue also features Roxanne Jackson’s work, as well as two partnerships with the Denver Art Museum (Overthrown: Clay Without Limits) and Keiko Gallery (Japanese artists).

    Issue nr. 1 also presents interviews and articles with new and world-renowned ceramic artists: Claire Muckian, Carol Gouthro, Ian F. Thomas, Cynthia Lahti, Carole Epp, Simcha Even-Chen, Liza Riddle, Patrick Colhoun, Mark Goudy, Chang Hyun Bang, Ian Shelly, Shamai Gibsh, Margrieta Jeltema, John Shirley, Jim Kraft, Connie Norman, Blaine Avery, Antonella Cimatti, Maciej Kasperski, Wim Borst, Merete Rasmussen.

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  • Els Wenselaers: Brain controlled vehicle, 2009, 19 x 35 x 26 cm, Ceramic, used materials

  • Kjersti Lunde: Kjuke / Mushroom, 2011 - porcelain (Photo: Klara Sofie Ludvigsen)

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