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marvelous mud

» Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition feature

This month we’re making a special feature for the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition, which is on view June 11 through September 18, 2011 at the Denver Art Museum.

It’s the first feature made by Ceramics Now Magazine, and includes images from the Overthrown exhibition and interviews with 10 of the exhibiting artists, plus with the curator of the exhibition. At the end of July, we will also send a special newsletter. Subscribe here to our monthly newsletter.

NAVIGATION (HOW TO):

About Overthrown - About the Overthrown feature on Ceramics Now Magazine
/Overthrown - Images from the exhibition (in High Quality).
/Overthrown_Interviews - Interviews with 10 of the exhibiting artists.
/nameofthe_artist (ex: /Linda_Sormin) - Images with the works of the artist you’re looking for.

Interviews (many will be published at the end of July):

Gwen F. Chanzit - The curator of the exhibition.

  • Overthrown: John Roloff, The Sea Within the Land/Laramide, Landscape Projection, Seascape Structure 31

  • Overthrown: Brendan Tang, Manga Ormolu ver. 5.0-b, 2009. Ceramic and mixed media. Lent from the collection of Dr. Brian Tschumper, courtesy of Plus Gallery, Denver. Manga Ormolu ver. 5.0-a, 2009. Ceramic, glass, and metal. Lent by the artist and courtesy of Plus Gallery, Denver. Photo by Jeff Wells.

  • Coming in July: Special feature for the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition at the Denver Art Museum

    This July we will make a special feature for the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition at the Denver Art Museum, which is on view June 11 through September 18, 2011.

    It will include images with the exhibited works and many interviews with the participating artists. You will find all the related content in the Overthrown page.

    Also, the interviews will be featured in our special edition newsletter (will be sent at the end of the month). Subscribe here if you haven’t already.

    Read the preview of the interview with Gwen F. Chanzit, the curator of the exhibition.

    The twenty-five artists in Overthrown: Clay Without Limits took on adventurous challenges to make the works in this exhibition. Most were made especially for Overthrown and many are in direct dialogue with our dynamic Daniel Libeskind-designed architecture; they move beyond the pedestal to the wall, the floor, and even the ceiling. A few extend beyond the Anschutz Gallery, across the entire museum complex. They break boundaries that are physical, technological, conceptual, and spatial.

    Working in all scales, from architecturally expansive to almost impossibly small, the artists in Overthrown employ twenty-first-century technology hand-in-hand with standard modeling and molding techniques. They use digital cameras, computers, laser cutters, 3-D printers, and computer-controlled mills along with more traditional tools.

    Some push the forms of functional objects. Others push the limits of fragility. They take risks that draw on material chemistry and maverick kiln techniques. Some of their works include not only clay, but also found objects such as metal, plastic, and abandoned industrial materials. Overthrowing our expectations of ceramic art—its size, its context, its methods, and its meaning—these artists show us new ways of using this versatile and timeless material.

    Artists:

    Katie Caron
    Nathan Craven
    Benjamin DeMott
    Kim Dickey
    Heather Mae Erickson
    Neil Forrest
    John Gill
    Del Harrow
    Marie T. Hermann
    Tsehai Johnson
    Andrew Martin
    Walter McConnell
    Kristen Morgin
    Mia Mulvey
    Jeanne Quinn
    John Roloff
    Annabeth Rosen
    Anders Ruhwald
    Martha Russo
    Paul Sacaridiz
    Linda Sormin
    Julian Stair
    Brendan Tang
    Cheryl Ann Thomas
    Clare Twomey

    Curator: Gwen F. Chanzit, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art and the Herbert Bayer Collection and Archive

    Location: Anschutz Gallery, Level Two, Hamilton Building / The Denver Art Museum

    The Denver Art Museum is located on 13th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock Streets in downtown Denver. Open Tuesday–Thursday and Saturday Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Friday 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving and Christmas. General admission for Colorado residents: $10 adults, $8 seniors and students, $3 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. Admission for non-Colorado residents: $13 for adults, $10 for seniors and students, $5 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. The Cultural Complex Garage is open; enter from 12th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock or check the DAM website for up-to-date parking information. For information in Spanish, call 720-913-0169. For more information, visit http://www.denverartmuseum.org/ or call 720-865-5000.

  • Overthrown: Clay Without Limits

    Overthrown, Clay Without Limits - The Denver Art MuseumOverthrown: Clay Without Limits brings together regional, national and international artists who push the boundaries of clay to create large-scale installations that respond to the dynamic architecture of the Daniel Libeskind-designed Hamilton Building. The majority of the 25 participating artists will create site-specific artworks. Highlights include a large-scale ceramic and found object sculpture by Linda Sormin that utilizes the colossal, slanted wall in the Hamilton Building atrium; an installation of suspended clay flakes, the largest around 300 pounds, by Neil Forrest; a 23-foot chandelier by Jeanne Quinn; and a tiled enclosure with freestanding elements by Anders Ruhwald. Overthrown also includes a sampling of smaller ceramic objects that acknowledges that other means, besides size, can challenge expectations of the material.

    Exhibition curator: Gwen F. Chanzit, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art and the Herbert Bayer Collection and Archive

    Location: Anschutz Gallery, Level Two, Hamilton Building

    Overthrown: Clay Without Limits is organized by the Denver Art Museum. Significant support is provided by Fred and Jana Bartlit and Vicki and Kent Logan. Additional funding is provided by the Adolph Coors Foundation Exhibition Endowment Fund, the citizens who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District, and the generous donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign. Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine, CBS4, and The Denver Post. Special thanks to the Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative Art.

    The exhibition is part of Marvelous Mud: Clay Around The World exhibition, and it’s on view June 11 through September 18, 2011.

    The Denver Art Museum is located on 13th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock Streets in downtown Denver. Open Tuesday–Thursday and Saturday Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Friday 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving and Christmas. General admission for Colorado residents: $10 adults, $8 seniors and students, $3 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. Admission for non-Colorado residents: $13 for adults, $10 for seniors and students, $5 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. The Cultural Complex Garage is open; enter from 12th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock or check the DAM website for up-to-date parking information. For information in Spanish, call 720-913-0169. For more information, visit http://www.denverartmuseum.org/ or call 720-865-5000.

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