Craft Spoken Here / Philadelphia Museum of Art

Craft Spoken Here exhibition at Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, USA

Craft Spoken Here / Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, USA
May 5 - August 12, 2012

Crafts were prominent among the first works of art to enter the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art when it was founded in 1876, and the Museum has continued to collect and exhibit crafts. Today, thanks in large part to the Women’s Committee and gifts from individuals, the Museum is particularly well-known for its holdings of twentieth-and twenty-first-century American, European, and Asian craft.

With Craft Spoken Here, the Museum seizes the opportunity to experiment with its collection and to understand craft in an international context. Some forty contemporary works from 1960 to the present in ceramic, glass, metal, wood, lacquer, paper, and fiber—some by living, acclaimed artists and others by lesser-known creators—are on view. Representing the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe, the works highlight formal qualities that cross cultures, time, and media.

Craft Spoken Here features an array of engaging education programs and interpretive materials, including on-site artist demonstrations and hands-on craftmaking activities for the public.

The exhibition is divided into three sections. Essential Element looks at continuing importance of line—the graphic gesture—as an expressive and compositional element in the work of artists. Rebecca Medel’s The One (1985) uses a network of lines to form a dense cube of knotted cotton and linen threads, dark on its fringes and progressively lighter towards the center, which creates the illusion of a luminous sphere floating in an atmospheric haze. The second section, Shape Shifting, includes works in clay, glass, wood, metal, paper, and fiber materials that have been fashioned into sculptural forms. Motoko Maio’s Kotodama (2008) is a folding screen in silk and linen that can be adjusted to divide a room, provide privacy, or rest decoratively in a corner. The final section is Gesture, which includes works that offer visual and emotional cues, such as the chaotic, seemingly uncontrollable framework of Jessica Jane Julius’s Static (c. 2008), in which hundreds of black glass flameworked threads combine in a sculptural evocation of the artist’s reoccurring dream.

Curator
Elisabeth Agro, The Nancy M. McNeil Associate Curator of American Modern and Contemporary Crafts and Decorative Arts

The exhibition is made possible by The Leonard and Norma Klorfine Foundation Fund for Modern and Contemporary Craft. Additional support is provided by the Windgate Charitable Foundation and the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In-kind support is provided courtesy of Lion Brand Yarn.

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Kwok-Pong ‘Bobby’ Tso: The View From Above Series No.1, Industrial landscape, 2011, White earthenware, cone 04 oxidation, sanded surface, plastic, metal, and wood, H 8, W 18, D 15

Kwok-Pong ‘Bobby’ Tso: The View From Above Series No.1, Industrial landscape, 2011, White earthenware, cone 04 oxidation, sanded surface, plastic, metal, and wood, H 8, W 18, D 15

Kwok-Pong ‘Bobby’ Tso: Delta, Industrial landscape Series, 2010, Earthenware, underglazes, wood, hobby paper, plastic, metal, latex paint, enamel, H 12 1/4, W 15, D 13 ½

Kwok-Pong ‘Bobby’ Tso: Delta, Industrial landscape Series, 2010, Earthenware, underglazes, wood, hobby paper, plastic, metal, latex paint, enamel, H 12 1/4, W 15, D 13 ½

Kwok-Pong ‘Bobby’ Tso: Industrial landscape: The View From Above Series No.3, 2012, White earthenware, cone 04 oxidation, sanded surface, additional detail created by plastic, metal, and wood, H 13, W 20, D 16

Kwok-Pong ‘Bobby’ Tso: Industrial landscape: The View From Above Series No.3, 2012, White earthenware, cone 04 oxidation, sanded surface, additional detail created by plastic, metal, and wood, H 13, W 20, D 16

Overthrown: Brendan Tang, Manga Ormolu ver. 5.0-b, 2009. Ceramic and mixed media. Lent from the collection of Dr. Brian Tschumper, courtesy of Plus Gallery, Denver. Manga Ormolu ver. 5.0-a, 2009. Ceramic, glass, and metal. Lent by the artist and courtesy of Plus Gallery, Denver. Photo by Jeff Wells.

Overthrown: Brendan Tang, Manga Ormolu ver. 5.0-b, 2009. Ceramic and mixed media. Lent from the collection of Dr. Brian Tschumper, courtesy of Plus Gallery, Denver. Manga Ormolu ver. 5.0-a, 2009. Ceramic, glass, and metal. Lent by the artist and courtesy of Plus Gallery, Denver. Photo by Jeff Wells.



Right now, on display at the Nancy Margolis Gallery are Eva Hild’s aluminum outdoor sculptures.

“Hild, known for her white and dark ethereal flowing ceramic forms, has ventured to another material and process. Hild’s new sculpture is made of aluminum, may be installed outdoors, is similar in design to her elegant white and dark sculpture, however the process is quite different.”



“Hild builds the initial model for the sculpture, and the skilled technicians at the foundry prepare the mold from the model. After the casting is completed it is coated with a sealer to protect the surface from erosion. Hild also has made very large scale public sculptures that are installed in Boras, Sweden where she lives and works, and in other locations in Sweden.”



~~ JJ (via)

Right now, on display at the Nancy Margolis Gallery are Eva Hild’s aluminum outdoor sculptures.

“Hild, known for her white and dark ethereal flowing ceramic forms, has ventured to another material and process. Hild’s new sculpture is made of aluminum, may be installed outdoors, is similar in design to her elegant white and dark sculpture, however the process is quite different.”

“Hild builds the initial model for the sculpture, and the skilled technicians at the foundry prepare the mold from the model. After the casting is completed it is coated with a sealer to protect the surface from erosion. Hild also has made very large scale public sculptures that are installed in Boras, Sweden where she lives and works, and in other locations in Sweden.”

~~ JJ (via)