Kira O’Brien

Kira O Brien Ceramics - featured artist on Ceramics Now

Kira O’Brien's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

“My work has a sculptural yet functional element to it and encompasses a sense of traditional ceramic techniques. Within this tradition is the art of storytelling and symbols which evoke certain sentiments and nostalgia but also a sense of the present environment. This environment is psychological and therefore each piece points to emotions within the narrative.

My present work is currently narrated by the symbol of the chair.
How does one define a simple thing like the chair? What makes the chair, a chair? As James Joyce says in A Portrait of a young man, “Is a chair conceived as a work of tragic or comic art?”
No other object forcefully shapes the physical, social and emotional dimensions of our lives. On the chair seats only one person at a time and responds to the body through comfort. It has a communicative function and offers a glimpse into our collective ideas about that sense of comfort and order.
One can imagine the world from a persons’ perspective as it communicates compassion. Just as its absence communicates disrespect, lack of empathy and loss, whether this loss is a physical or emotional one.” Kira O’Brien

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Kira O’Brien: The Sleepers, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 14cm

Kira O’Brien: The Sleepers, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 14cm

Kira O’Brien: The Meeting, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 12x15x26cm

Kira O’Brien: The Meeting, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 12x15x26cm

Kira O’Brien: chair, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 30x13x13cm

Kira O’Brien: chair, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 30x13x13cm

Kira O’Brien: Blue Lady, 2011, Sgraffito, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 40cm

Kira O’Brien: Blue Lady, 2011, Sgraffito, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 40cm

Kira O’Brien: Anonymous, 2011, Sgraffito, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 35cm

Kira O’Brien: Anonymous, 2011, Sgraffito, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 35cm

Kira O’Brien: Absent, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 30x18x15cm

Kira O’Brien: Absent, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 30x18x15cm

Kira O’Brien: The Night, 2011, Wall Platter, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 35cm

Kira O’Brien: The Night, 2011, Wall Platter, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 35cm

Kira O’Brien: Apple, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 20x8x12cm

Kira O’Brien: Apple, 2011, white earthenware, black and colored slips, 1150 transparent glaze, 20x8x12cm

Annie Woodford

Annie Woodford Contemporary Ceramics, featured artist on Ceramics Now Magazine

Annie Woodford's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

Intrigued by the tenuous connection between past, present and future and the shadowy, illusive meaning of time, Annie Woodford makes work that is both haunting and enigmatic. Shifting boundaries between science and metaphysics and an enduring interest in parallel universe theory instill the pieces with a heightened intensity, whilst an obsession with hidden worlds has prompted her investigations into microscopy and the nano universe - making the unseen seen.

Captivated by the natural world and our mysterious, infinite universe - whether seen at macroscopic or microscopic levels - she finds them the source of endless fascination and wonder. Mankind’s place within that universe and the dichotomy between our wish for progress and our proclivity for self-destruction, has become a central theme.

A passion for frozen environments and the message they embrace, not only from the past but also for the future of our planet has resulted in research trips to the Arctic and Iceland and a detailed study of the coldest place on Earth – Antarctica.

The work exhibits qualities that reflect the natural world, elements that highlight its beauty and transience. Fragile, frangible, complex and esoteric, delicately balanced between risk and control, her pieces float and oscillate between absence and presence, hovering silently in a place between.

‘Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere’ Blaise Pascal, mathematician, poet, philosopher.

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Ceramic Impressions by Judy DiBiase / BDA Dental Museum, London, UK

Ceramic Impressions by Judy DiBiase, exhibition at the BDA Dental Museum, London, UK

Ceramic Impressions by Judy DiBiase / BDA Dental Museum, London, UK
February 23 - May 24, 2012

Works in porcelain inspired by the collections of the BDA Dental Museum and its visitors.

London based ceramic artist Judy DiBiase has been working with the museum to capture the visitor’s different reactions to the museum’s collections and the memories the objects provoke. These have then provided part of the inspiration for Judy’s own response, in ceramics, to the museum’s collection which can be seen on show in the museum and around the BDA.

"Objects make us think. We think of the time and place when they were used, their purpose and method of use. They evoke memory, acting as a catalyst for a host of experiences that are revived by interaction.

The BDA Dental Museum houses a fantastic and fascinating array of objects that are connected to my memories. My father, David DiBiase was a leading orthodontist; I grew up surrounded by images of teeth. Plaster impressions in green boxes, diagrams and x-rays of displaced incisors and canines. I remember Dad dictating letters and storing dental notes in brown files. Looking at the museum collection my memories become heightened and vivid.

My practice is concerned with how memories can be drawn out by objects. Memories layer to inform an emotional understanding of ourselves and our environment. I have worked with the Museum collection, recording people’s reactions to objects which are connected by the observer to personal incidents and events. My work is exhibited alongside the collections, so taking it out of a traditional art gallery setting.

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