Cindy Billingsley

Cindy Billingsley Contemporary Ceramic sculptures on Ceramics Now

Cindy Billingsley's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

Art should come from the heart of the artist, it should engage the audience, it should connect with the community, it should start a dialog, a debate. It should get people to look at things in a way they have not thought of, or to see what they have looked at but not really seen. Art has to come deeply from the artist, there has to be raw emotion and honesty in the work if it is to connect with people. An Artist paints and sculpts what they know. These are all the reasons I wanted to do a show about Alzheimer’s disease. To start a dialog, to connect, to get people to understand what it is like to have the disease, it is a part of my life, so it is what I know, what I am around. I took those thoughts and feelings and transformed them into visuals to engage my audience.
I speak through paint and clay. Art is a look inside the artist, what I am feeling is transferred into the clay while I am sculpting, Those feelings have to go somewhere. I wanted to tell a story, I wanted you to feel how it is, the frustrations, humor, the compassion and the heartache of having Alzheimer’s disease and for the ones caring for one with this disease.

William Faulkner said it best ~ The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it it moves again since it is life.

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Cindy Billingsley: Chamber Nautlius, 2005, 15” x 18” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Chamber Nautlius, 2005, 15” x 18” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Giraffes - Out of the ordinary, 2008, 25” x 28” x 22”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Giraffes - Out of the ordinary, 2008, 25” x 28” x 22”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Gorilla, 2008, 22” x 20” 21”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Gorilla, 2008, 22” x 20” 21”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Koala, 2007, 25” x 27”x 15”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Koala, 2007, 25” x 27”x 15”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Transformation, 2011, 25” x 8” x 12”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Transformation, 2011, 25” x 8” x 12”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Tapir, 2007, 15” 15” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Tapir, 2007, 15” 15” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Father and Son, 2008, 25” x 15” 12”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Father and Son, 2008, 25” x 15” 12”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Lemur and baby, 2008, 15” x 8” 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Lemur and baby, 2008, 15” x 8” 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Anteater and baby, 2009, 15” x 28” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Anteater and baby, 2009, 15” x 28” x 9”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

David D. Gilbaugh

David D. Gilbaugh Contemporary Ceramics

David D. Gilbaugh's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

“Through creating and teaching others how to make “Treepots” and “Tectonic Sculptures,” I have dedicated my artistic efforts in ceramics to exploring life and the irony of renewal through death. Trees are the primary subject of my work and human emergence is its’ theme. Through this creative work I engage the interrelationship between humanity and nature. 

I focus on trees because I have a natural love of them from my youth. As a child I spent my summers with my brother roaming the woods of northern Illinois, and as an adolescent I spent them backpacking the forests of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Observing the tree excites my creative expression because it demonstrates the promise of renewal in the events of birth, the processes of aging, and the inevitability and promise of new life through death and decay. In this way life continuously takes on evolved and more beautiful forms through both creation and evolution. Both are proven simultaneously in the cycle of life. Evidence of this is shown most brilliantly to me in the life cycle of trees and I speak of it most effectively through my art in the medium of clay.” David Gilbaugh

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David Gilbaugh: Bearded Ghoul, 2009, sculpted lamp base, 11”(W) x 21”(H), hand-built, B-mix stoneware with grog, cone 10, iron and rutile oxides

David Gilbaugh: Bearded Ghoul, 2009, sculpted lamp base, 11”(W) x 21”(H), hand-built, B-mix stoneware with grog, cone 10, iron and rutile oxides

David Gilbaugh: Siren Lamp Base, 2008, sculpted lamp base, 10”(W) x 22”(H), hand-built slab and coil, B-mix stoneware, cone 10 reduction, black stain

David Gilbaugh: Siren Lamp Base, 2008, sculpted lamp base, 10”(W) x 22”(H), hand-built slab and coil, B-mix stoneware, cone 10 reduction, black stain