Paula Bellacera

Paula Bellacera Ceramics

Paula Bellacera's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

“All my life I have been fascinated with form and color. During my youth I watched my mother dabble in various art media; eventually she settled on ceramics. Inspired by her explorations I struck out on my own. I focused on the two-dimensional plane first with photography, then painting, and finally printmaking. Recently I began attending a community Raku night where I discovered my true joy is interacting with clay and creating three-dimensional forms. The spontaneity and plasticity of the medium makes handbuilding a process of discovery - full of surprises. My approach is a collaboration where the clay and I work together to discover hidden shapes and reveal emotions and personalities through animal forms.

Just as friends and acquaintances have their own distinctive traits and behaviors, each of my sculpted animals has personality and expresses a unique character. When people step into my world (via studio or gallery), they often smile and chuckle as they recognize a bit of themselves, their pets, friends or family members in the postures and expressions of my sculptures. In this work, my intention is to present the best of humanity through our animal friends and to help us laugh and love our differences and ourselves.” Paula Bellacera

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Debra Fleury: Flow, 2011. Red stoneware, porcelain and glaze. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 28 cm x 28 cm x 7 cm

Debra Fleury: Flow, 2011. Red stoneware, porcelain and glaze. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 28 cm x 28 cm x 7 cm

Debra Fleury: Glider, 2010. Porcelain. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 50 cm x 15 cm x 17 cm

Debra Fleury: Glider, 2010. Porcelain. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 50 cm x 15 cm x 17 cm

Cindy Billingsley: Koala, 2007, 25” x 27”x 15”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Koala, 2007, 25” x 27”x 15”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Chimp Portrait, 2008, 15” x10” x 8”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Chimp Portrait, 2008, 15” x10” x 8”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

David Gilbaugh: Sycamore Teappot #1, 2010, sculpted teapot, 6” W X 8”D X 9”H, hand built with dowels, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain over porcelain decorating slip

David Gilbaugh: Sycamore Teappot #1, 2010, sculpted teapot, 6” W X 8”D X 9”H, hand built with dowels, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain over porcelain decorating slip

David Gilbaugh: A Man At Ten, 2008, statuette, 4”(W) x 8”(H), hand-built coil, B-mix stoneware with grog, cone 10 reduction, Babu Porcelain, iron, rutile, and cobalt oxide stains

David Gilbaugh: A Man At Ten, 2008, statuette, 4”(W) x 8”(H), hand-built coil, B-mix stoneware with grog, cone 10 reduction, Babu Porcelain, iron, rutile, and cobalt oxide stains

David Gilbaugh: Racemosa, 2011, sculpted teapot, 4”(W) x 11”(H) x 8”(D), hand-built slab, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stainPermanent collection of the American Museum of Ceramic Arts

David Gilbaugh: Racemosa, 2011, sculpted teapot, 4”(W) x 11”(H) x 8”(D), hand-built slab, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain
Permanent collection of the American Museum of Ceramic Arts