Debra Fleury: Tidal 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 10 cm x 10 cm x  8 cm

Debra Fleury: Tidal 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 10 cm x 10 cm x  8 cm

Debra Fleury: Flow, 2011. Red stoneware, porcelain and glaze. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 28 cm x 28 cm x 7 cm

Debra Fleury: Flow, 2011. Red stoneware, porcelain and glaze. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 28 cm x 28 cm x 7 cm

Debra Fleury: Limpid, 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall or surface installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 11 cm x 11 cm x  5 cm

Debra Fleury: Limpid, 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall or surface installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 11 cm x 11 cm x  5 cm

Debra Fleury: Ice, 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 5 cm x 5 cm x  7 cm

Debra Fleury: Ice, 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 5 cm x 5 cm x  7 cm

Debra Fleury: Glider, 2010. Porcelain. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 50 cm x 15 cm x 17 cm

Debra Fleury: Glider, 2010. Porcelain. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 50 cm x 15 cm x 17 cm

Debra Fleury: Exopool, 2010. Porcelain, glass and glazes. Multiple firings to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere) and cone 6 (neutral atmosphere). Dimensions 18 cm x 11 cm x  15 cm

Debra Fleury: Exopool, 2010. Porcelain, glass and glazes. Multiple firings to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere) and cone 6 (neutral atmosphere). Dimensions 18 cm x 11 cm x  15 cm

Debra Fleury: Colony, 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and Glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 7 cm x 7 cm x  5 cm

Marianne McGrath: Thoughts on Long Drives (gallery shot), 2009, porcelain, earthenware, plywood, steel rod, plaster, dimensions variable

Marianne McGrath: Thoughts on Long Drives (gallery shot), 2009, porcelain, earthenware, plywood, steel rod, plaster, dimensions variable

Suzanne Stumpf

Suzanne Stumpf's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

“One of my interests is in making multi-component, interactive sculptures. Most of these works have innumerable permutations for viewing. Perhaps partially influenced from my background as a professional musician, these flexible sculptures allow for creating variations in the artwork such as might be experienced in the live performance of a musical composition from concert to concert. Some of the works may appear to be “games,” but generally there are no rules for arranging the components.

I work primarily in porcelain because this claybody receives and juxtaposes textures so articulately. Glazes are employed minimally; some works make use only of slips, underglazes, and oxide washes. My building combines altered wheelthrown as well pure handbuilding techniques.” Suzanne Stumpf

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Suzanne Stumpf: Nest with Eggs III, 2011, 10”w x 2.5”h, altered wheelthrown with handbuilt components; porcelain and porcelain paperclay; oxidation fired to cone 10
Both nests and eggs hold important concepts for reflection and meditation for me. Eggs represent new beginnings, promise, mystery, and fragility. Nests signify “home,” with the intention of comfort and protection, and in the case of wildlife, camouflage. As an avid birdwatcher, amateur naturalist, and sculptor, I am intrigued by the variety of nests found in nature for both their architectural inspiration and symbolism. These three works are from a series of nest sculptures I am making.

Suzanne Stumpf: Nest with Eggs III, 2011, 10”w x 2.5”h, altered wheelthrown with handbuilt components; porcelain and porcelain paperclay; oxidation fired to cone 10

Both nests and eggs hold important concepts for reflection and meditation for me. Eggs represent new beginnings, promise, mystery, and fragility. Nests signify “home,” with the intention of comfort and protection, and in the case of wildlife, camouflage. As an avid birdwatcher, amateur naturalist, and sculptor, I am intrigued by the variety of nests found in nature for both their architectural inspiration and symbolism. These three works are from a series of nest sculptures I am making.