Overthrown: Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis, 2010–11. Porcelain,  paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted  tools, steel  and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents,  electrical  cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper,  beeswax.

Overthrown: Martha Russo and Katie Caron, Apoptosis, 2010–11. Porcelain, paper clay, glaze materials, colored pigments, assorted tools, steel and hardware, silicone, LED Lights, compact fluorescents, electrical cables, wires and conductors, utility poles, abaca paper, beeswax.

Overthrown:   Clare Twomey, Collecting the edges. 2011. Red clay dust. Site-specific   project for the Denver Art Museum supported by Jana and Fred Bartlit.   Photo by Jeff Wells. #6

Overthrown: Clare Twomey, Collecting the edges. 2011. Red clay dust. Site-specific project for the Denver Art Museum supported by Jana and Fred Bartlit. Photo by Jeff Wells. #6

Overthrown:   Clare Twomey, Collecting the edges. 2011. Red clay dust. Site-specific   project for the Denver Art Museum supported by Jana and Fred Bartlit.   Photo by Jeff Wells. #3

Overthrown: Clare Twomey, Collecting the edges. 2011. Red clay dust. Site-specific project for the Denver Art Museum supported by Jana and Fred Bartlit. Photo by Jeff Wells. #3

Interview with Cynthia Lahti - Recognized artist, April 2011

Interview with ceramic artist Cynthia Lahti - Spotlight- Recognized artist, April 2011

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Ceramics Now Magazine
: What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces?

Cynthia Lahti: I am working on several ideas right now: people wearing disguises, busts of elegant women, and male/ female couples. These are all subjects that have always interested me but that I have never fully explored.

I am also continuing to use some of the broken piece from my discarded sculptures that I have saved. This idea started in 2010 with he creation of the sculpture Vault Alarm that was composed of broken sculptures. In my current exploration of this idea, I am experimenting with combining the broken pieces together to form a new figure. This idea came from realizing that when I destroying unsuccessful sculptures, body pieces that remained were often extremely interesting to me and I could not discard them. I am finally inspired to see how they look combined together and I have been very excited by the results.


Socks - View her works

In what technique do you usually work and what materials do you use?

I am focusing on hand-built ceramic sculptures of human and animal figure(s). I like to use a wide variety of clay bodies, my favorite being porcelain.  I have used all types of firing techniques to achieve the final surface treatment on the pieces. I am most excited but the results I have been getting from cone 10 soda and salt firings and low fire raku.

What was the starting point in your investigation?

I start by finding images of figures that intrigue me in older books and magazine, I then do drawing of the images and finally sculptures, inspired by these drawings, are create out of clay.

My art is influenced by human artifacts from ancient times to the present, as well as by my personal experiences and emotions. Like the varied objects and images I draw on for inspiration - from 1940s knitting catalogs and outsider art, to Native American cedar carvings and Degas’ sculptures of dancers—my artworks force an explanation of reality and compel viewers to connect to a larger human experience. Currently I am focusing on ceramic sculpture based on expressive images of the figure I find in a variety of source materials.

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