Tim Hawkinson - Mobius Ship, 2011

Tim Hawkinson was born in San Francisco, California, in 1960. A graduate of San Jose State University, he later earned his MFA at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1989. Hawkinson is renowned for creating complex sculptural systems through surprisingly simple means. His installation, “Überorgan”—a stadium-size, fully automated bagpipe—was pieced together from bits of electrical hardware and several miles of inflated plastic sheeting. Hawkinson’s fascination with music and notation can also be seen in “Pentecost,” a work in which the artist tuned cardboard tubes and assembled them in the shape of a giant tree. On this tree, the artist placed twelve life-size robotic replicas of himself, and programmed them to beat out religious hymns at humorously irregular intervals. The source of inspiration for many of Hawkinson’s pieces has been the re-imagining of his own body, and what it means to make a self-portrait of this new or fictionalized body. In 1997, the artist created an exacting, two-inch-tall skeleton of a bird from his own fingernail parings, and later made a feather and egg from his own hair; believable even at a close distance, these works reveal Hawkinson’s attention to detail as well as his obsession with life, death, and the passage of time. Hawkinson has participated in numerous exhibitions in the United States and abroad, including the Venice Biennale (1999); Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (2000); the Power Plant, Toronto (2000); the Whitney Biennial (2002); and the 2003 Corcoran Biennial, Washington, DC. Tim Hawkinson resides in Los Angeles with his wife. (via)

Tim Hawkinson on art21.

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CONCEPTION - Part Two / Canvas Galleries, Belfast

CONCEPTION - Part Two at Canvas Galleries, Belfast with Patrick Colhoun and Darren MacPherson

CONCEPTION - Part Two / Canvas Galleries, Belfast
September 27 - October 11, 2012

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 27, 6.30 - 9.00 pm.

Following on from Conception Part One London in June, Darren MacPherson and Patrick Colhoun introduce the second part of a two part exhibition of work from two very different but complimentary artists. Two mediums, MacPherson’s vibrant, acid coloured figurative paintings alongside Colhoun’s dark, brooding, somewhat disturbing contemporary sculpture.

Part one in June was London, MacPherson’s base; part two is Belfast, Colhoun’s hometown.

Part one, described as ‘Art with balls’ by Cool on Demand Culture blog, showcased the work in a gritty industrial setting in South East London. The second venue will be a contemporary white cube gallery in Belfast, a city really starting to find its feet in the genre of contemporary art.

Two artists, two cities, two cultures, two mediums.

Darren MacPherson has a growing reputation as a contemporary figurative artist whose acrylic and spray paint works are bold and full of colour.

His frequent use of high key colours can be jarring, even startling to a first-time viewer. The negative space in the composition used merely to emphasise the foreground; this is the part of his work that he spends most time on, adding layer upon layer of content. Darren’s colours bounce off the canvas and his chaotic, sometimes erratic, strokes make for abstract suggestions of the male and female form.

Inclusion in prestigious events such as FLAGSTOP in Los Angeles, the inaugural Other Art Fair in London and the 2011 National Open Art Exhibition are cementing MacPherson as an artist with a growing reputation.

Patrick Colhoun is a contemporary sculptor living and working in Belfast. His irreverent approach and ever darker subject matter make for work that is anything but traditional ceramics. His use of other materials such as latex, hosiery and piercings add to the mix.

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Bharti Kher / Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London

Bharti Kher exhibition Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London

Bharti Kher / Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London
September 14 – November 11, 2012

Preview: 13 September 2012, 6.30 – 9 pm.

Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art is delighted to present works by Bharti Kher in her first solo exhibition held in a public art institution in London. The exhibition is composed of a selection of works from the recent past, with an emphasis on the artist’s sculptural works.

Known for her extensive use of everyday, found objects and imaginatively transforming their identity, Kher empowers her often otherworldly creations to present themselves unabashedly as if they were a natural part of our culture and environment. Kher’s work often explores the notion of the self as a multiple, open to interpretation and shape-shifting. Her art practice is intimately intertwined with her life, not only because she borrows motifs and artifacts for her work, but also because she has an inquisitive mind and a strong desire to understand sociological issues. Such characteristics endow Kher’s work with a narrative quality and fascinating interiority of things that frequently contradict her practice of addressing more global and collective concerns. This tension is precisely what leads us more deeply into Kher’s work and world and prompts us to reposition our own relationship to her individual pieces.

Kher is perhaps best known for her elaborate and stunning bindi dot paintings: abstract, swirling constellations of colourful bindis glued to flat surfaces that create unique imagery somewhere between being illusory and hyper-realistic. But in recent years her artistic creations have become increasingly bold and unrestrained, several examples of which are on show in the exhibition. The phenomenal, life-size elephant that is The skin speaks a language not its own, 2006, made of fibreglass and covered with serpent - or sperm-shaped white bindis, bears a symbolism that leaves viewers uncertain about the animal’s condition. The title of the work, always an important component of Kher’s works, suggests that physical appearance and inner values are often in conflict.

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Wouter Dam exhibition / Galerie NeC, Hong Kong

Wouter Dam exhibition at Galerie NeC Hong Kong

Wouter Dam exhibition / Galerie NeC, Hong Kong
28 June - 18 August, 2012

"The ceramic sculptures I make, do steadily develop along a clear line, this last group of sculptures here on show are slightly larger and with more unbroken circles incorporated into the sculpture, in this way slowly revealing more of its origins, the vase and bowl shape.

The sculptures are closed and curled on to itself and in this way, keeping more of it’s secret, enticing you to explore the almost hidden inside of the sculpture.
They are covered with a coloured engobe, the latest colours I have introduced are the soft pink, a light porcelain blue, and a grey tone. All these colours are specifically chosen to enhance the shape and to give a good contrast in between light and shade.

The sculptures are built up of elements made on the potterswheel, assembled when leatherhard, every one of them becoming a unique sculpture, although clearly belonging to the same family of shapes.

The sculptures are like drawing lines in space, making the clay seem weightless. The edges are refined and cut through the air in contrast to the soft voluminous exterior surfaces that bask in the light.” Wouter Dam, 2012

Gallery Hours: Monday to Saturday, 11 am - 8 pm. Sunday 1 pm - 6 pm.

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Tim Rowan: New Works / Cavin-Morris Gallery, New York

Tim Rowan: New Works exhibition at Cavin-Morris Gallery, New York, NY

Tim Rowan: New Works / Cavin-Morris Gallery, New York, NY
April 5 - May 12, 2012

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 5th, 6-8 pm.

The American sculptor Tim Rowan’s personal quietude belies the depth and activity of his process. He allows his work to be his voice but sometimes this leaves much to the perceptions of the viewer. The work often depends on the viewer not only to intellectually grasp it but to intuit it as well. The Japanese aesthetic of Yugen or mysterious essence is an important part of his presentation. This work not only occupies gallery space but it also has a placement in the context of his studio and land. When you see his work in its birthplace you realize you are standing in the presence of one of the world’s great Poets of Place.

Tim Rowan’s work does not refer directly to the history of traditional Western ceramics. Of course aspects of all ceramic sculpture processes are universal but his work does not travel to us out of an evolution of Western form and surface techniques. By this token they barely travel out of Japanese form either, though there are parts of the process that refer to it obliquely; firing technique and flame markings for example. But his cups are not chawan, and his sculpture does not quote Bizen form. His urns are not mizusashi. If there are any references at all to the work of his teacher, Ryuichi Kakurezaki, they come from Rowan’s responding to that work despite the Japanese legacy that work comes from. When you look closely at Tim Rowan’s abstract pieces the implications of his freeform place in history come home to roost. You can compare his colors perhaps, his textures perhaps, his melted ash perhaps, but his forms are his alone. They are not utilitarian objects trying to break free from tradition. They are however, utilitarian to the eye and the soul, used in aesthetic contemplation and the cerebral and ephemeral pleasures therein. He is saying new things in an ancient language.

I am not sure I would label Rowan as anything but a Contemporary Artist. His expansion to found and shaped stone forms extend his ceramic vocabulary. He is a Minimalist but that is more a description of his affect than of any philosophical viewpoint. The tension in his pieces is not minimal. His work covers power with a veneer of control and calm; a dangerous directed power. It seethes. The spikes on his cups or in his bowls, the cracking and splitting of his geode-like forms whether ceramic or metal, reveal mineral turmoil and convey a universe that can be ominous and/or aggressive even in its quietest moments. He creates a geological ethnography with objects that have resonances beyond the membrane of our ordinary aesthetic recognition.

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Andrew Barton: Final Frontier / SODA, Istanbul, Turkey

Andrew Barton: Final Frontier exhibition at SODA Gallery, Istanbul, Turkey

Andrew Barton: Final Frontier / SODA, Istanbul, Turkey
March 1 - April 14, 2012

SODA is pleased to announce “Final Frontier”, the first solo show of internationally renowned sculptor Andrew Barton. The exhibit consists of space helmets from three major religions. The expanse of religion to our final frontier, space. Expressing a dystopian future of possible religious conflict in the heavens.

Andrew Barton was born in 1970 London, England. MFA from The Oslo National Academy of the Arts (KHiO).
Male fertility, non-loving sex, violence and cannibalism were reoccurring themes in Barton`s work from the end of the 90`s. Barton`s work then took a new direction focusing on the torso or body fragment in combination with a foreign object or abstract shape, dealing with bodily transformations and meditative states of being. His current work deals with industrial products from dystopian futures; space helmets designed for religious expansion in space, and bomb suits tailored for the mundane acts of shopping and child`s play in a future society gone bad.

SODA is a contemporary art and design space founded in Istanbul in January 2010. SODA focuses on artists and designers using different materials and medias from various disciplines and supports contemporary art jewellery, which is a globally rising trend. SODA presents artists and designers distinctive in their field and examples of contemporary movements to audiences that are open to innovation and aims to introduce a new perspective to collectors.

Gallery Hours: Monday to Saturday between 11am and 7pm.

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The nature of things / New Art Centre, Roche Court, Wiltshire, UK

The nature of things exhibition / New Art Centre, Roche Court - Jennifer Lee

The nature of things / New Art Centre, Roche Court, Wiltshire, UK
4 February - 15 April 2012

The nature of things is the second in a series of design shows in the Artists’ House curated by Sarah Griffin. In the Artists’ House, the allocation of function in the architecture dictates the layout and content of the exhibition. The monumental and uncanny willow forms by Laura Ellen Bacon dominate the double elevation of the exterior of the house. Her forms identify its scale and architectural character - dramatically organic against the backdrop of modernist rigour.

Hans Stofer takes up residence in the bedroom on the ground floor, where he unpacks his personal life and turns the room into a confessional. The most ephemeral and inconsequential of materials are tenderly remade into jewellery and autobiography, a mix of found objects made meaningful through artistry and intention. This very private space requires the viewer to trespass and scrutinise.

On the first floor, ceramic vessels by Jennifer Lee revel in light and space. Born of meticulous research and experiment, the controlled, poised forms belie their organic hand-built beginnings. The unglazed surfaces speak of a multitude of abstracted references, but it is as function and sculpture in perfect proportion to the human body that they are understood.

Sarah Griffin has described her selection for the exhibition as follows: In her house, Madeleine Bessborough keeps a table for her grandchildren with finds from nature and otherwise. Invariably one will see a bird’s nest, a petrified newt, a dried allium head, curiously shaped flints, a plastic butterfly. The table is found in the Cube, itself a carefully curated space, and the proximity of the specimen table to the art around it is typical of the way one looks at everything at Roche, with heightened awareness flipping between display, art, nature, accident and intent. This way of looking and seeing also informs my selection of artists for the Artists’ House.

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David Gilbaugh: Sycamore Teappot #3, 2011, sculpted teapot, 11”(H) x 8”(D), hand-built slab, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain over porcelain decorating slip

David Gilbaugh: Sycamore Teappot #3, 2011, sculpted teapot, 11”(H) x 8”(D), hand-built slab, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain over porcelain decorating slip

David Gilbaugh: Sycamore Teappot #1, 2010, sculpted teapot, 6” W X 8”D X 9”H, hand built with dowels, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain over porcelain decorating slip

David Gilbaugh: Sycamore Teappot #1, 2010, sculpted teapot, 6” W X 8”D X 9”H, hand built with dowels, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain over porcelain decorating slip

David Gilbaugh: Orange Oak Teapot, 2008, sculpted teapot, 9”(W) x 17”(H), hand-built slab, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain throughout, Winokur Yellow glaze on bark surfaces

David Gilbaugh: Orange Oak Teapot, 2008, sculpted teapot, 9”(W) x 17”(H), hand-built slab, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain throughout, Winokur Yellow glaze on bark surfaces

David Gilbaugh: The Imaginist, 2009, sculpture, 21”(W) x 33”(H) x 23”(D), hand-built coil, B-mix stoneware, cone 8, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain throughout, interior - red engobe.

David Gilbaugh: The Imaginist, 2009, sculpture, 21”(W) x 33”(H) x 23”(D), hand-built coil, B-mix stoneware, cone 8, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain throughout, interior - red engobe.

David Gilbaugh: Family Tree, 2007, sculpture, 6.5”(W) x 11.5”(H), hand-built coil, B-mix stoneware with grog, cone 10 reduction, iron, rutile, chrome and cobalt oxide stains

David Gilbaugh: Family Tree, 2007, sculpture, 6.5”(W) x 11.5”(H), hand-built coil, B-mix stoneware with grog, cone 10 reduction, iron, rutile, chrome and cobalt oxide stains

David Gilbaugh: Racemosa, 2011, sculpted teapot, 4”(W) x 11”(H) x 8”(D), hand-built slab, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stainPermanent collection of the American Museum of Ceramic Arts

David Gilbaugh: Racemosa, 2011, sculpted teapot, 4”(W) x 11”(H) x 8”(D), hand-built slab, B-mix stoneware paper clay with grog, cone 10 reduction, black stain brushed in crevices, water washed iron and rutile stain
Permanent collection of the American Museum of Ceramic Arts

Suzanne Stumpf: Interactive Sculpture No. 9, 2008, 16”h x 8”w x 8”d, wheelthrown porcelain with handbuilt components; black slip and shellac resist; oxidation fired to cone 10Although Interactive Sculpture No. 9 appears at first glance to be some sort of game, there are no rules here. It is intended for the playful pleasure of the viewer to arrange the sticks with their different colored tips entirely to their own whim. (When all the sticks are removed the work is a trompe l’oeil with the raised black dots hiding its holes.)

Suzanne Stumpf: Interactive Sculpture No. 9, 2008, 16”h x 8”w x 8”d, wheelthrown porcelain with handbuilt components; black slip and shellac resist; oxidation fired to cone 10

Although Interactive Sculpture No. 9 appears at first glance to be some sort of game, there are no rules here. It is intended for the playful pleasure of the viewer to arrange the sticks with their different colored tips entirely to their own whim. (When all the sticks are removed the work is a trompe l’oeil with the raised black dots hiding its holes.)