Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Wing Series, 2011White stoneware, slab built, 29” H x 24”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Wing Series, 2011
White stoneware, slab built, 29” H x 24”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #3, 2008White Stoneware, slab built, 38” H x 29”W x 33”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #3, 2008
White Stoneware, slab built, 38” H x 29”W x 33”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Barry Flanagan was one of the most radical sculptors of his generation. Though best known for his statues of bronze hares, his earlier work, in materials as varied as cloth, plaster, and sand, show how he challenged the very idea of what sculpture could be. Fellow artist Peter Randall-Page shares his memories of his close friend. Download this video.

Barry Flanagan: Early Works 1965-1982, Tate Britain

Barry Flanagan: Early Works 1965-1982, Tate Britain
27 September 2011 - 2 January 2012

Barry Flanagan was one of Britain’s most original and inventive artists and a key figure in the development of British and international sculpture. He is best known for the large-scale bronze hare sculptures that he began producing in the early 1980s and that can be seen in many galleries and public spaces around the world. The success of these pieces has tended to obscure the equally important and very different work that characterised his early period. Made from materials as varied as cloth, plaster, sand, hessian and rope, these works highlight a concern with material properties and processes - a concern that is at the heart of his practice.

A contemporary of Gilbert & George, Flanagan studied sculpture at St Martin’s School of Art from 1964 to 1966. The exhibition takes this period as a starting point and reveals the impact of this early work on his later development towards casting in bronze, which he began in 1979. This is the first major retrospective of Flanagan’s work in London since 1983, and by focusing on his early works, shows how this radical and imaginative artist challenged the very nature of sculpture in his time.

Susan Meyer: Shaft, detail, 2010, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures and aluminum, 50” x 14” x 14”

Susan Meyer: Shaft, detail, 2010, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures and aluminum, 50” x 14” x 14”


Modern Art Oxford presents Teacher of Dance, the first major UK exhibition of the Seoul- and Berlin-based artist Haegue Yang. Yang has developed a distinctive practice of colourful and sensorial installations and sculptures that seek to occupy the spaces where public and private meet and contend with one another. Through her work, Yang discloses narratives, individual portraits and her own sentiments, reflecting the balance of research and intuitive enquiry that underlies her practice. She predominantly uses materials drawn from the domestic realm, yet employs an abstract language to free the work from any narratives that influenced her production process. (via)

Haegue Yang at Modern Art Oxford

Modern Art Oxford presents Teacher of Dance, the first major UK exhibition of the Seoul- and Berlin-based artist Haegue Yang. Yang has developed a distinctive practice of colourful and sensorial installations and sculptures that seek to occupy the spaces where public and private meet and contend with one another. Through her work, Yang discloses narratives, individual portraits and her own sentiments, reflecting the balance of research and intuitive enquiry that underlies her practice. She predominantly uses materials drawn from the domestic realm, yet employs an abstract language to free the work from any narratives that influenced her production process. (via)

Haegue Yang at Modern Art Oxford

(Source: artnotartnot)

Dryden Wells

Dryden Wells' profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

“In each stage of the processes of my creating, new ideas and concepts seem to reveal themselves, bringing a new life to my work.   Working devoutly in clay, I continue to be challenged and seduced by the medium.  The manipulation of the material is what excites me, whether I am working big or small, loosely or precisely.

Interior and exterior spaces are primary oppositions that I use in my work both formally and conceptually.  Using animal forms as a subjects for my process and vehicles for my content, I am able to address these spaces literally and metaphorically.  The animal form allows me to juxtapose other distinct opposites such as life and death, positive and negative.  I feel that through this synthesis I am presenting questions and concerns which are not necessarily answered in the work.

Recently, I am interested in creating forms or sculptures through the use of multiples.  The multiples I am using are specifically segments of animals made with both hand-built and mold made forms. By fragmenting and stacking them, I am trying to obscure the initial subject and capture the evidence of a space and motion.  I work and build both intuitively and analytically in an attempt to contrast these formal characteristics and to push my concepts.” Dryden Wells

Dryden Wells, originally from St. Louis, Missouri, first completed a BFA in Ceramics and a BSED (K-12) at Missouri State University in Springfield, MO. In the Fall of 2005, Wells moved to Lubbock, Texas, to pursue an MFA degree in Ceramics at Texas Tech University, which he completed Spring of 2008. Wells, having previously been a resident artist at the Pottery Workshop: An Experimental Sculpture Factory in Jingdezhen, China, during the summers of 2006 and 2007, has recently been hired as the Design Studio Manager of The Pottery Workshop to assist in the maintenance and development of the Design Studio as well as to continue the development of his own work.

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Cynthia Lahti

Cynthia Lahti's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

Read the interview with Cynthia Lahti, Recognized artist - April 2011

“My goal is to create works of art that resonate with honesty and reflect the beauty and chaos of the world. My art is influenced by human artifacts from ancient times to the present, as well as by my personal experiences and emotions. Like the varied objects I draw on for inspiration—from 1940s knitting catalogs and outsider art, to Native American cedar carvings and Degas’ sculptures of dancers—my artworks force an explanation of reality and compel viewers to connect to a larger human experience. I work in various media, including drawing, collage, and sculpture.

Currently I am focusing on ceramic sculpture based on expressive images of the figure I find in a variety of source materials. There are so many figures out there in the world, wearing so many poses and costumes; I find those that resonate and interpret them in clay. Each sculpture expresses an intense inner psychological state, its surface effecting a fluctuating quality, part beautiful, part grotesque.

I grew up in Portland, Oregon and continue to live and work here.” Cynthia Lahti

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