Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

group exhibition

When I Woke / Llantarnam Grange Arts Centre, Cwmbrân, UK

When I Woke exhibition Llantarnam Grange Arts Centre, Cwmbran, Wales

When I Woke / Llantarnam Grange Arts Centre, Cwmbrân, Wales, UK
October 6 - November 18, 2012

When I Woke – an exploration of the human condition curated by Claire Curneen and Lowri Davies.

When Llantarnam Grange Arts Centre invited celebrated ceramicists Claire Curneen and Lowri Davies to curate an exhibition as part of the centre’s “Makers to Creators” series both artists relished the opportunity to expand their artistic horizons and provide a completely different perspective to their practice.

Inspired by Dylan Thomas’ poem ‘When I Woke’, the exhibition is full of questions about life, death and change. Each of the exhibitors examine the gritty questions which surround the human dilemma. The body and the figure are central to these artists and the exhibitors explore issues in relation to beauty, the visceral body, myth, folklore and tradition. The subject matter is complex and in very different ways they strive in search for something hidden or lost.

Artists: Tamsin van Essen, Sam Bakewell, James Page, Lina Peterson, Audrius Janusonis, Sophie Woodrow.

Tamsin van Essen explores the cultural obsessions with perfection and beauty. There is a tactile beauty in the objects surface and form yet they talk about the visceral decaying body which leaves us somewhat unsettled.

The visceral is also evident in Sam Bakewell and James Page’s work. Bakewell uses solid masses of clay to suggest the body, the objects are dense and immediately physical. These objects are not static forms, they are in a state of flux and are bursting with life.

James Page asks us to reassess our perception of our own bodies. His work is a celebration of the physical nature of the human body with an affirmation of our earthly connection.

Lina Peterson is a jeweller that tells a human story. Her work has a sense of the ritual, in some instances drawing inspiration from Roman artifacts. Peterson response to ancient artifacts is to ‘fill the gap’ and to put back what is missing, in turn creating a new and original narrative.

Audrius Janusonis and Sophie Woodrow use traditional figurative modes of practice. They explore a sense of place, often mythical and sometimes untangible. Janusonis is Lithuanian whose work is known across Europe but has never before been shown in  UK. His figures have a strong allegorical message often referencing the texts of Ovid’s Metamorphoses. His understanding of the human form is extraordinary.

Sophie Woodrow entices us in to a strange world where the relationship between animal and human are blurred. Her figures stare out at us revealing some sinister folk story. They are reminisent of staffordshire flatbacks, domestic in scale yet subversive in nature.

Read More

  • Three exhibitions at The Clay Studio, Philadelphia, PA

    Three exhibitions at The Clay Studio, Philadelphia, PA
    October 4-28, 2012

    Peter Morgan exhibition The Clay Studio Philadelphia

    Peter Morgan: All Aboard at Harrison Gallery
    The 2011-2012 Evelyn Shapiro Foundation Fellowship Exhibition

    All Aboard includes work that Morgan made this past year, while serving as the Evelyn Shapiro Foundation Fellow. This fellowship afforded him a monthly living stipend, materials and firing stipend, free studio space, this solo exhibition and a tri-fold publication produced in support. A representational sculptor, Morgan received a BA in fine arts from Roanoke College, Salem, VA, a BFA from the California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, CA and his MFA in 2005 from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred NY. His work builds on a tradition in ceramics that began in the 1960’s and emerged out of California’s Bay Area. The artists working within this tradition created representational sculpture, oftentimes humorous and/or tongue in cheek, irreverent and anti-establishment, their inspiration drawn from the beat movement, Pop Art, and the then burgeoning counter culture revolution. 

    Morgan employs many of the practices of his Funk predecessors using word puns and humor, to create surreal narrative compositions, layered in meaning. His sculptures may grow out of a childhood memory, his love of a specific food item, history or a perplexing current event. With All Aboard, Morgan takes the viewer on a train ride like none other they’ve had. As in all his work, the train cars are skillfully and sensitively sculpted, Morgan’s interest in and love for his subject matter evident and felt. 

    His sculptures are real and unreal, familiar yet foreign. Morgan states, “The work is an investigation and celebration of cultural mythologies. I think of my sculptures as being platonic ideals in physical form. They focus on our ideal understandings and desires of these objects in our minds, yet they often bear very little in common with the actuality of these concerns.” Jeff Guido, Artistic Director

    Blue and White exhibition The Clay Studio Philadelphia
    Blue and White at Reed Smith Gallery

    The field of ceramics is laden with numerous traditions of technique, material, style, and form specific to a given culture and or specific time period. Few traditions moved beyond borders or lasted through time to become significant to multiple cultures. The tradition of Blue & White is one that has; a white clay body serving as ground for blue decoration applied by hand, stenciling, or screen transfer. Islamic tin-glazed tile of the 9th century, pinyin or blue flowers drawn on 14th century Chinese porcelain pots, the narrative hand-painted Delft pots of the 16th century Dutch, to the English and American traditions of Willowware, the process of cobalt blue decoration on fine, translucent, and white porcelain is a deeply rooted tradition, crossing cultures and spanning great lengths of time.

    Read More

  • Contemporary Clay Invitational / j fergeson gallery, Farmville, VA

    Contemporaryc eramics exhibition - Contemporary Clay Invitational exhibition j fergeson gallery, Farmville

    Contemporary Clay Invitational / j fergeson gallery, Farmville, VA
    October 5 - December 15, 2012

    Opening Reception: Saturday, October 13, 5:00 pm.

    The latest show at the j fergeson gallery in Farmville, VA, explores the diverse possibilities of what can be done with clay. This show, the gallery’s largest of the year, features works from 30 national artists. Here one will find both sculptural and functional pieces, but perhaps most interesting is the way the artists have settled somewhere in between.

    The show is an extraordinary collection of ceramic work by artists working at the top of their field. Co-curators Andréa Keys Connell, lead professor in clay at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Adam Paulek, lead professor in clay at Longwood University, chose the artists for their commitment to fine craft, progressive thought, sensitivity to material and humor.

    Artist A. Blair Clemo, inspired by the ornate history of European Decorative Arts, creates vessels that are functional, but also ridiculously opulent, as if ready to serve royalty. John Oliver Lewis presents two sculptures inspired equally by architecture, natural land formations, cartoons, and candy - think Monument Valley out of salt water taffy. And then there’s Darrin Ekern’s “potasaurus”: a sculpture of a T-Rex in a studio throwing a pot.

    Featured artists:
    A. Blair Clemo, Kurt Anderson, Tom Bartel, Jason Hackett, Hiroe Hanazono, Mike Jabbur, Bethany Krull, John Oliver Lewis, Richard Nickel, Nathan Prouty, Debbie Quick, Dave Smith, Mikey Walsh, Trent Berning, Kelly Berning, Jeff Campana, Sam Chung, David Eichelberger, Darrin Ekern, Misty Gamble, Meredith Host Kowalski, Nicole Aquillano, Frank Martin, Dan Molyneux, Chris Picket, Adrian Sandstrom, Amy Santafararo, Shawn Spangler, Kendra Sparks, Adero Willard.

    This variety of work isn’t often seen in small galleries, and the curators are excited to present it to an audience that may be unfamiliar with just how adventurous contemporary clay has become.

    Read More

  • MODERN TALKING, Museum of Art Cluj-Napoca, Romania

    MODERN TALKING group exhibition, Museum of Art Cluj-Napoca, Romania

    MODERN TALKING, Museum of Art Cluj-Napoca, Romania
    February 15 - April 15, 2012

    The Museum of Art in Cluj-Napoca is hosting the group exhibition entitled “Modern Talking”, featuring contemporary artists whose works are challenging the conventions of painting and its legacy. Through the work of the invited artists, the visitor will be able to re-conceptualize the traditional acception of painting, which is no longer restricted to the oil-on-canvas formula, but offers a multitude of other alternatives. Fabric, metal, found objects, conceptual statements, flamboyant actions, installations and sculptures, all of these are putting forward an extended understanding of the medium; today, painting is expanded, painting is overall.

    Artists:
    Sonia Almeida (PT); Mark Barrow (US); Baldur Geir Bragason (IS); Vittorio Brodmann (CH); Ana Cardoso (PT); Aline Cautis (US); Radu Comşa (RO); Ann Craven (US); Francesca DiMattio (US); Ida Ekblad (NO); Enzo Giordano (IT); Heather Guertin (US); Davíð Örn Halldórsson (IS); Ingunn Fjóla Ingþórsdóttir (IS); Jacob Kassay (US); Gilda Mautone (IT); Florin Maxa (RO); Dan Măciucă (RO); Elizabeth Neel (US); Ylva Ogland (SE); Paloma Presents [Urs Zahn & Roman Gysin] (CH); Zak Prekop (US); Jo Robertson (UK); Małgorzata Szymankiewicz (PL); Patricia Treib (US); Daniel Turner (US); Garth Weiser (US).

    Special project by Sarah Ortmeyer (DE).

    Organizers: Nicola Trezzi and Daria D. Pervain, in collaboration with Ewa Gorządek, Helena Kontova, and Giancarlo Politi.

    Read More

  • All work is copyright of respective owner, otherwise © 2014 Ceramics Now. Website powered by Tumblr.