Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

Articles

The Dance of Infinity

Article by Hagai Segev, 2014

“Up until two years ago, my father, Yaakov, had an agricultural mechanization workshop. Every time I visited the workshop, I found myself entranced by the power of the iron boards and the pile of black and rust colored iron pipes of different diameters, waiting to be used”, Simcha Even-Chen reminisces.

“When I saw the call for entries for the contest and exhibition at Kapfenberg, Austria, entitled “At the Moment”, I decided to use these memories of my father’s workshop. This was the birth of “A Moment Before…” a work I created in 2009, which has since led to the growth of a whole body of works”.1

Simcha Even-Chen Contemporary Ceramics

A moment before…, 2009, Mixtures of stoneware and porcelain, 11.5 x 30 x 24 cm.

The memories that awakened this body are the evolution of the artistic research Even-Chen had been immersed in during the period of 2006-2009. This group of sculptures, entitled “Illusion”, was exhibited at The Fifth Israeli Ceramics Biennale at The Eretz Israel Museum (2008), among other places, and even received the Gold Coast International Ceramic Art Award. The article that appeared in the biennale catalogue read: “Simcha Even-Chen creates arrays of objects, reminiscent of game pieces. The pieces and geometric shapes simulate complex mathematical relations, based on scientific principles of simplification, alongside an awareness of the complexity of the game”.2

In her works from the period of 2009-2010, as her research progressed, the cubic shapes and structures gained a softer sculptural presence. They were positioned on solid, dominant foundations, where the first, barely noticeable signs of a light, flowing motion began to appear. In a piece named “Triple Balance” (2010), the massiveness and relatively harsh geometry of the top object is softened somewhat by the gentle presence of the foundation, which seemingly serves as only that, but its connection suggests an integrated statement, alongside a message of contrasts. This piece was featured in important exhibitions in Italy and Korea.3

In the piece entitled “Motion” (2011), all the elements of movement and flow can for the first time, be seen in the object itself, while the pattern printed on the object surface continues to explore the geometric shape, namely, the grid, which stands out against the background of evenly hued material. This piece was awarded first prize in an exhibition in Slovenia.4

Simcha Even-Chen Contemporary Ceramic art

Motion, 2011, Mixtures of stoneware and porcelain, 25 x 46 x 25 cm.

“My decision to add the element of movement to the existing physical balance gave birth to the open, broad, flowing motions and expanded the variety of imaginary shapes”, says Even-Chen. Her intentional break-away from defined shapes gave way to a new abundance of form, organic and free. The well-defined lines of geometric shapes were unleashed, and became the flowing lines that outline the movements of a dance, in which the body of the dancer is pushed to its limit. The flowing lines move in circles, twist, constrict and expand again. They face the material’s ability to carry itself to the limits of its natural properties.

While her earlier works studied the foundations of the material, these works examine its potential to reach infinity. Even-Chen’s work tests the material’s point of collapse, asking which points need to be supported to prevent the structure from breaking down or falling. This constant fear of collapse can be seen even now, when the sculptures are fired and stable. Their fragility is present in each and every moment. Within this fragility lies a hidden power: the almost inconceivable resilience of gentleness.

All of Even-Chen’s works address the tension between that which is planned and that which is not; between the expected and the unexpected. Inside the scientific thought-process, the basis of Even-Chen’s thinking, there is also a search for an emotional balance – an important element in her life, which has now found a clear outlet. But at the same time, these works continue to manifest their scientific foundation by dealing with the existence of movement within the limitations of the material.

Even-Chen’s study of the materials she has elected to work with reveals a search for release from familiar outlines. Her dealing with organic shapes is an expression of her search for freedom within the framework of her beloved material. The conceptual framework, too, leans on that, which is known, or can be derived from accrued knowledge; or on a memory that surfaces from time to time. But this reliance is but a starting point, a jumping board towards new destinations, which may not be as familiar, but are certainly more intriguing.

Simcha Even-Chen Ceramic exhibition at Benyamini Contemporary Ceramics Center Tel Aviv

Balance in Motion is on through July 5, 2014, at the Benyamini Contemporary Ceramics Center, Tel Aviv.

Even-Chen’s sculptures are autonomous bodies that stand independent of narrative or objectification. They have no practical use; one can only gaze upon them and marvel at the tackling of space, sculpting and aesthetics. In this aspect, they are unique in the field of applied ceramics. Their intrinsic presence allows the viewer to disregard the personal and psychological associations and examine them as autonomous bodies, existing in a sculpting space, evoking thoughts of an object’s place in the universe and raising for discussion values that stand apart from the body of their creator, if only for a moment. This possibility offers many different levels of coping with the artistic creation: a sort of Möbius strip that leads the eye and the hand in a seemingly paradoxical trajectory that cannot exist in the real world.

These abstract qualities, the flow of curves in the ceramics, raise associations of the enormous sculptures of minimalist sculptor, Richard Serra. In his colossal, steel structures, Serra managed to formulate a refined minimalistic presence that has a profound effect on viewers who walk in their vicinity. Dwarfed by the presence of these monumental pieces, the viewer is invited to follow their outline and form sequential shapes, as he strolls between them or alongside them. The active walking and touching of the fierce metal bodies make the viewer a participant in the physical experience of sculpting.

Read More

  • Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics / Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh

    Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics at Contemporary Craft

    Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics / Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh
    April 25 - November 1, 2014

    The Transformation series, one of the Society for Contemporary Craft’s signature programs, was established in 1997 as a biennial juried exhibition focusing on traditional craft media–glass, wood, metal, clay, and found materials–in rotation. The exhibition seeks out an international selection of artists redefining their medium to create work that is challenging and thought provoking; inviting us all to reconsider our notion of “craft.”

    This year’s focus is on clay. Clay has been used, decorated, coveted, and collected for thousands of years, yet in the hands of contemporary artists this irresistible medium continues to surprise through innovative techniques, forms, and functions. Visitors are invited to see what happens when makers push the boundaries of time-honored craft materials—right before our eyes, something old is new again.

    In conjunction with each Transformation exhibition, the jurors award the participating artist whose work best displays the tenets of excellence and innovation the Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize. Named in honor of SCC’s founder, the award is accompanied by a $5000 cash prize.

    Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics features the work of all 31 of the Raphael Prize finalists, a selection of internationally recognized and emerging artists. The exhibition highlights outstanding and innovative examples of contemporary works in clay, all of which have been created within the last year. The work of three regional artists—Chuck Johnson of Venango, PA, Erica Nickol of Pittsburgh, PA, and Ian Thomas of Slippery Rock, PA—is included in the exhibition.

    Linda Swanson of Montreal, Quebec has been selected as the winner of the Society for Contemporary Craft’s (SCC) 2013 Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize competition. Two honorable mention honorees, Lauren Gallaspy of Salt Lake City, UT and Lee Somers of Montevallo, AL, and one merit recipient, Lauren Mabry of Philadelphia, PA, were also announced at the exhibition opening on April 25, 2014.

    Swanson’s winning entry, Cypreus Lumen, 2013, is a 20 inch round wall disk made from crystalline glazed porcelain with a painted aluminum rim. The turquoise glaze looks almost liquid with the faintest ripple of movement on the surface. A patch of deep red disrupts the calm in a dynamic swirl of motion. “Processes of change, formation, and dissolution are caught in this crystalline glazed surface,” says Swanson of the piece. “A flow of molten colorants in an optically ambivalent and luminous frozen moment recalls geology as well as biology, and elicits material affinities between the body and the world around us.”

    Linda Swanson Ceramics - 2013 Raphael Prize Winner

    As the 2013 Raphael Prize winner, Swanson shows several other ceramic works in Transformation 9, each exploring the changing nature of matter. A site-specific installation similar to her piece Osmogenesis (recently seen at the Northern Clay Center in Minneapolis, MN) was installed in SCC’s main gallery throughout the run of the exhibition. Combining the slow and steady drip of water onto a clay-covered steel surface, the piece is constantly changing. As the water burrows through the clay, the underlying metal surface is exposed in a collection of bubbling craters. Swanson describes the piece as exploring the “interdependence of organism and environment, as well as organism and organism – in which one species is created, or at least sustained, by and through another.”

    Born in Los Angeles, CA, Swanson received her B.A. in Art History from University of California Santa Barbara, her B.F.A. in Ceramics from California State University, and her M.F.A. in Ceramics from the School of Art and Design at Alfred University, Alfred, NY. Currently, she lives in Montreal, Canada where she is an Assistant Professor at Concordia University. Swanson’s ceramics have been exhibited in SOFA Chicago with the Lacoste Gallery, Elemental at the Northern Clay Center in Minneapolis, and INFESTATION, a public art installation at the Parcs Canada Lachine Canal Historic Site in Montreal. In 2013, Swanson was named an Emerging Artist by NCECA, the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts.

    An honorable mention award was given to Lauren Gallaspy for her piece, Giving Up the Ghost, 2014. The startling 16” tall sculpture combines soft, feminine lines with a mass of ceramics shards and strips. Gallaspy received her M.F.A. in Ceramics from Alfred University and has been named a NCECA Emerging Artist. She describes her work as being “about imbalance—the vulnerability of living things— and the sometimes violent, sometimes pleasurable, almost always complex consequences that occur when bodies and objects in the world come into contact with one another.”

    A second honorable mention award was presented to Lee Sommers for his work, Scape IV, 2014. Having also received his M.F.A. in Ceramics from Alfred University, his work has been exhibited throughout the United States and China. Known for his distinctive ceramic collages, Sommers explains his process as “a coupling of fleeting notions and physical realities. Collage is a key strategy in both the physical and conceptual organization of my work. Drawing from a variety of sources, ongoing acts of sampling, collecting and cataloging, leads to a critical mass of components. Weaving a matrix of relations between these parts, I find compositional epiphanies - parallels to aesthetic experiences etched in my memory.”

    Additionally, the jurors gave a merit award to Lauren Mabry for her piece, Curved Plane, 2013. The artist, a M.F.A. graduate from University of Nebraska-Lincoln, describes her work as “painterly, abstract, ceramic sculpture.”

    Lauren Mabry Ceramics at Transformation 9

    The jury for the 2013 prize was composed of Joshua Green, Executive Director of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts; Jae Won Lee, a Korean American ceramic artist and Associate Professor at Michigan State University; Alexandra Raphael, enamel artist, London, England; Catherine Raphael, metalsmith and storyteller, Pittsburgh, PA; Kate Lydon, Director of Exhibitions at SCC; and Janet McCall, Executive Director at SCC.

    “This prize honors artists who are redefining the boundaries of their media to create work that is challenging and thought-provoking. The strength and recognition of this competition has grown over the past 17 years and continues to challenge our viewers understanding of craft today,” said McCall.

    Read More

  • 2nd International Ceramic Art Symposium “LANDescape” - Ceramic Laboratory: Call for Applications

    2nd International Ceramic Art SYmposium LANDescape Daugavpils

    2nd International Ceramic Art Symposium “LANDescape” - Ceramic Laboratory: Call for Applications
    Submissions deadline: June 15, 2014

    Dates: August 11-25, 2014
    Location: Mark Rothko Art Center, Daugavpils, Latvia

    International Ceramic Art Symposium “LANDescape” 2014 is a joint initiative of Daugavpils Clay Art Center and Daugavpils Rothko Art Center which emerged from both partner organizations’ activities and cooperation aimed at promoting contemporary art, including contemporary ceramic processes in Latvia.

    In the framework of planned ceramic symposium “LANDescape”, drawing inspiration both from Latvian nature and cultural space, as well as personal world, the participants are invited to create unique ceramic art works with their chosen materials and techniques, although there is a conjunctive theme, that indicates „spurting”, „escaping” „getting away”, etc.

    The “LANDescape” symposium is being organized for the second time, and this year’s symposium is assigned with an additional title - Ceramic Laboratory. This year our aim is to create a kind of laboratory, where artists experiment and share their experience with each other in different ceramic firing technologies. While choosing the symposium participants, priority will be given to artists who, alongside the creative work will offer a firing master class and/or public lecture dedicated to the ceramics or ceramic technologies, which will subsequently be published in the catalogue of the symposium.

    Symposium Organizers: Daugavpils Mark Rothko Art Center in collaboration with association „Daugavpils Clay Art Center” Symposium aims:
    1. To create unique contemporary ceramic objects for Latvian art and cultural space, to create a platform for artists to exchange experiences and generate creative idea, as well as to promote contemporary ceramic processes in the society;
    2. To promote high quality contemporary art availability to public, raise public interest in culture, preservation of cultural heritage, to promote the creation of new artworks and their collections.

    Symposium participants: 15 professional ceramists participate in the Symposium. Selection of the participants will be held taking into consideration the materials sent (Application, CV and visual information that are sent, taking into consideration the regulations below).

    Symposium organizers’ liabilities:
    1. Artists’ accommodation costs in Daugavpils (hotel and meals);
    2. Working studios;
    3. Working materials: clay (1000 ºC), chamotte clay (1000-1100 ºC), glaze.
    4. Opportunity to use wood-firing kiln, electric kiln, as well as a chance to explore different types of individual firing;
    5. Publicity (information in mass media, publishing of symposium catalogue);
    6. Recreation possibilities: tour around the city and region, visiting educational arts establishments in Daugavpils;
    7. Opportunity to present a creative work;
    8. Symposium opening exhibition (opening on August 12, 2014);
    9. Symposium final exhibition (opening on August 23, 2014).

    Artist liabilities:
    1. Travel costs to Daugavpils and return home;
    2. Other materials and instruments necessary for work;
    3. Workshop and/or lecture presentation in frame of the symposium;
    4. To donate one art work from symposium opening exhibition to Daugavpils Mark Rothko Art Center (art works should be brought to the symposium opening exhibition);
    5. To donate one art work, which will be created during the symposium, and which will be chosen by specially organized jury, to Daugavpils Clay Art Centre;
    6. During first 5 days after receiving the invitation, an artist needs to confirm his/her participation (until July 10, 2014).

    For further information, download the regulations (.pdf).
    Click here to apply online.

    Read More

  • Byrdcliffe Artist in Residence Program / Woodstock, NY

    Byrdcliffe Artist in Residence Program, Woodstock NY

    Byrdcliffe Artist in Residence Program / Woodstock, NY
    Applications deadline: March 15, 2014

    Residency description
    The Byrdcliffe Artist in Residence program provides artists of exceptional talent with uninterrupted time and creative space to research and create new work. Lasting four weeks (or a possible eight weeks for ceramic artists), residencies provide artists with private studio space within a community of peers and the serene natural setting of the Byrdcliffe Art Colony. Artists are invited to participate in open studios, work-shares, communal dinners and field trips, or may spend their residency working in the creative solitude of a private studio. Byrdcliffe’s residencies are particularly beneficial to those who find it restorative to live in a simple, communal environment in close proximity to natural beauty.

    Surrounded by the Catskill Mountains and just west of the Hudson River, the Byrdcliffe Art Colony is home to over 80 artists each year, fifty of whom are hosted by the Artist in Residence Program. Beyond the AIR program, the Colony is comprised of more than a dozen artist cottages, the Byrdcliffe Theater, the Byrdcliffe Barn, a tennis court and the Mt. Guardian hiking trail, as well as the Kleinert/James Center for the Arts which is located in the center of Woodstock. Byrdcliffe hosts a regular schedule of artist talks, exhibitions, concerts, theater productions and guided hikes, most of which are year-round. Public events allow artists the opportunity to connect with the community at large. At Byrdcliffe creative time is sacrosanct, and artists are given free rein to decide what activities will contribute to their residency experience. Byrdcliffe offers a unique experience in simplicity of living amid the natural beauty of a 250 acre campus of protected fields and woodland. At the same time, Byrdcliffe provides the opportunity to live in a community of creative people of all ages and backgrounds who are dedicated to honoring the creative spirit.

    Eligibility
    The main criterion for acceptance to Byrdcliffe’s AIR program is artistic excellence and a demonstrated commitment to one’s field of endeavor. Byrdcliffe seeks to pull together artists from varying perspectives and demographics, engaging in a broad range of artistic practices. Emerging as well as established artists are invited to apply.

    Ceramics: Please apply using the Visual Artists’ online application! Byrdcliffe accepts artists working in handbuilding and wheelthrowing techniques. To be eligible for the residency, artists must have prior experience in glaze mixing and kiln firing.

    Selection Committee
    Residents are chosen by a selection committee of professionals in the arts. The major criterion for acceptance is proof of serious commitment to one’s field of endeavor. Professional recognition is helpful for admission, but is not essential.

    Panelists in the past have included: Gregory Amenoff, Jake Berthot, Joan Snyder, Portia Munson, Melissa Meyer and Donald Elder and literary panelists included Gail Godwin, Matthew Spireng, Martha Frankel (fiction), Olga Broumas (poetry), Gus Schulenburg, Evangeline Morphos, Rob Handel and Nancy Golladay (BMI Faculty).

    Read More

  • Red Lodge Clay Center Long Term Residency / Red Lodge, Montana, USA

    Red Lodge Clay Center Long Term Ceramics Residency

    Red Lodge Clay Center Long Term Residency / Red Lodge, Montana, USA
    Application Deadline: February 1st, 2014

    The Long-Term Residency (September 1 - July 31) is ideal for committed individuals in transition from post baccalaureate studies to graduate school, as well as those pursuing the development of professional artistic careers. Self-directed ceramic artists searching for the time, space and resources needed to explore new ideas and create new work will enjoy the rural mountainous setting. Accepted residents will be provided with studio space, housing, utilities, and a monthly stipend in exchange for twenty hours of work per week at the Clay Center. Responsibilities will include assisting in the retail operation of the gallery, teaching community clay classes, as well as cleaning and maintenance of the studio and gallery. Residents will be responsible for personal living expenses, as well as all material and firing expenses.
    Application Fee: $40

    The Red Lodge Clay Center welcomes applications from ceramic artists who will thrive working as a team, in a community minded atmosphere. The ceramics studio is located approximately six miles north of Red Lodge, 463 Two Mile Bridge Road. A form of transportation is necessary for the duration of the residency. Resident artists have 24-hour access to the ceramics studio. For more detailed information on material needs and studio equipment please contact the Red Lodge Clay Center.

    Click here to apply online.

    CONTACT
    residencies@redlodgeclaycenter.com

    Red Lodge Clay Center
    123 South Broadway
    Red Lodge, Montana 59068
    United States

    > More articles / View the list of articles, reviews and special features

  • Assistant Professor Ceramics at the Alberta College of Art + Design (ACAD), Calgary, Canada

    Assistant Professor Ceramics at the Alberta College of Art + Design (ACAD), Calgary, Canada
    Applications deadline: February 28, 2014

    Assistant Professor Ceramics, Alberta Collee of Art Design, CalgaryACAD’s School of Craft + Emerging Media welcomes applications for the following Permanent Faculty position commencing in the fall semester of the 2014-2015 academic year: Assistant Professor, Ceramics (Competition # 1314-DE-FP-27).

    The successful candidate will be expected to teach, demonstrate an active research/studio practice, and contribute to the strategic plan of the College through engagement in administrative service.

    Summary of Responsibilities - The successful candidate will:
    - Teach in all levels of the BFA and proposed MFA in Craft Media program, studio and lecture/seminar courses;
    - Contribute actively to curriculum development in the School ofCraft + Emerging Mediaand to the strategic initiatives of ACAD’s Research and Academic Affairs;
    - Maintain research/studio practice and contributions to research and scholarship in the field of contemporary craft, specifically ceramics;
    - Demonstrate a commitment to continuing pedagogical and academic excellence;
    - Provide service to the Faculty and College governance framework, including outreach activities that contribute to the academic life and profile of the College.

    Qualifications - The successful candidate will:
    - Hold a minimum of a Masters level degree or an equivalent level of graduate education.
    - Have a minimum of five (5) years post-secondary teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels (outside of graduate teaching assistantships) in studio, lecture, and seminar class formats.
    - Have a minimum of five (5) years of research/studio practice outside of post secondary education
    - Have a sound knowledge of ceramic technologies, methodologies, including wheel throwing, hand-building, mold-making and casting, clay and glaze technology, and knowledge of kiln firing technologies;
    - Have experience with digital object design and fabrication technologies;
    - Have experience teaching and working in interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary contexts;
    - Have a comprehensive knowledge of Ceramics history, contemporary theory and discourse in ceramics practices;
    - Have a broad knowledge of history, theory and practice as it applies to Craft, Art and Design;
    - Have excellent communication, interpersonal, time management, and organizational skills;
    - Have social and theoretical understandings of technology, art and culture;
    - Have the ability to organize collaboration in studio production or research;
    - Have excellent communication, interpersonal and time management/organizational skills;
    - Be community-minded and team oriented.

    Preference may be given to candidates with:
    - Ceramics studio management experience;
    - An active Studio Pottery practice.

    Submission Instructions
    Please submit applications as per the instructions on our How To Apply webpage. In addition, include: artist statements outlining philosophies and practices regarding teaching and studio practice. Only applications submitted electronically will be considered. Please package all files as a single PDF document and do not submit as a “zip” or “Stuffit” compressed file.

    Click here to submit your application.

    Read More

  • CLASS OF 2013 / The National Centre for Craft & Design, Sleaford, UK

    CLASS OF 2013 / The National Centre for Craft and Design, Sleaford, UK
    November 22, 2013 - January 19, 2014

    Each year,The National Centre for Craft and Design in Sleaford, Lincolnshire, UK selects work by the very best of the current year’s graduates from art colleges and universities all over the UK, and gives them the opportunity of exhibitingat the NCCD.

    This year’s show explores the theme of function in objects. A range of high quality, visually striking artworks created by 18 specially selected graduates are on display. They demonstrate a diverse range of skills from fashion and jewellery to ceramics and automata.

    Class of 2013 will be open to the public until Sunday 19 January 2014 everyday excluding Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Years Day from 10am to 5pm (3pm Christmas Eve).

    Ceramicists exhibiting in Class of 2013:

    Luke Bishop Ceramics

    Luke Bishop, Rongorongo: Forgotten Function 5, 2013, Porcelain and stoneware with latex additions, maximum H46 cm. Photo by Scott Murray.

    Luke Bishop
    HE Diploma in Fine and Applied Arts in Ceramics
    CityLit / London Metropolitan University

    Rongorongo; Forgotten Function is an exploration rooted in the language of function where both memory and meaning are lost. False lids, multiple spouts (some obstructed, some fixed, others detachable), curiously and illogically-placed holes and tubes intentionally disturb the recognized and accepted grammar and syntax of function, causing the viewer and potential user to experience a disruption in the affordance towards the object.

    In much the same way that an object excavated from the archaeological record only reveals to us a portion of its story, the meaning and uses of these vessels can never be completely recovered and known. Because the link between craft and everyday use has been permitted to slowly slip away from our collective experience, we are left with what we can only interpret but never fully explain. Function is forgotten.

    Luke’s work seeks to invite the viewer to wonder at these curious vessels, and to provoke us to awaken to the process of cultural richness being lost. Its creative corollary, however, is that such richness can endure when care is taken to preserve meaning, ritual, skill and knowledge?

    Zoe Clare Ceramics

    Zoe Clare, Invading Forms #4, #5, #6, #7, 2013, Porcelain, 56x61 / 34x48 / 17x30 / 30x60 cm. Photo by Scott Murray.

    Zoe Clare
    BA (Hons) Ceramic Design
    Central Saint Martins - University of Arts London

    Zoe is an artist who works predominantly with ceramic. She creates sculptures that are visually absorbing, rich in layers, texture and integral repetitive patterns.
    Zoe is influenced by the natural world around her and the discoveries made during her travels. The natural world, often overlooked, provides her with rich visual resources, which she then interprets and uses as a vessel to convey commentary and observations.

    The ‘Invading Forms’ series explores the effects and conservational issues of invasive, non-native plants and their effects on the bio diversity of South Africa’s endangered environment. The sculptures are a metaphor for the conservational issues and endangered biodiversity we are facing today.

    The sculptures, created in porcelain, take on the aggressive character of the invasive plants and become an invading form, growing organically and intrusively, absorbing anything and everything that is in its path.
    These structural forms are concerned with internal and external spaces and holds remnants of the extinct plants it has devoured inside for spectators to see. Sections of the invading forms are open, allowing the insides to be examined. Within are surprising textures and glazes depicting the exotic nature of the diminishing South African fauna and flora.

    Jade Crompton Ceramics

    Jade Crompton, Bubble vases, Ceramics, slip cast, semi porcelain, Pieces between 23x24 cm. Photo by John James Clare.

    Jade Crompton
    BA (Hons) Design
    Liverpool Hope University

    Combining traditional plaster mould making techniques with the modern techniques of 3D design, Jade uses prototypes and digital model making to create unique moulds for slip casting.
    Jade enjoys taking natural forms and applying structure and pattern using digital software, giving an organic and manmade appearance to her work. Overall her work is intended to be both aesthetically pleasing and functional.

    Her current work focuses on casting plaster moulds from 3D printed models and layering laser cut pieces of perspex, this process allows Jade to produce more detailed and precise designs. The works are inspired by the layers found in natural formations such as lava, rock and ice.

    Instead of using glazes or coloured slips which Jade finds too unpredictable, she uses airbrushed layers of under glaze which leaves a even matte coverage. She also adds a layer of clear glaze to the inside of her pieces which renders them waterproof.

    Ruth Harrison Ceramics

    Ruth Harrison (Porcelain, 2013, Photos by Scott Murray)
    Green Gradiant Strip / Red Gradiant Strip, 200x95 mm.
    Blue Disk with Orange Inlay / Yellow Disk with Blue Inlay / Green Disk with Red Inlay, 130x95 mm.

    Ruth Harrison
    BA (Hons) Ceramics
    Plymouth College of Arts

    Ruth Harrison uses porcelain to create sculptural forms using repeated elements. She is interested in symmetry and the idea of taking one shape and multiplying it many times over or around a cylinder. Her work evokes the childhood memory of running a hand or stick along a fence.

    Ruth chooses to use porcelain due to its white body when fired to 1260°c. Porcelain also works very well with coloured stain which she uses for some of her collections.
    Ruth draws the attention of the viewer to a section or strip of the finished piece using colour, texture or pattern which is added to the piece as it is being made. Each disk is hand cut using a cookie cutter from 3mm thick slabs of porcelain which are then cut in half, sponged, scored, slipped and attached to a slip-cast cylinder.

    Read More

  • Review: Mungyeong Traditional Tea Bowl Festival

    Article by Shamai Sam Gibsh & Stephanie Young
    Published in Ceramics Now Magazine Issue 2

    A movie set, created in the style of a sixth century village, within forests and farmland, cherry blossom and azaleas, in valleys and mountains centrally located in South Korea, is the stage for this amazing Mungyeong Tea Bowl Festival. The City of Mungyeong and the South Korean government sponsor the festival, now in its eighth year, and focus on reviving Korean Tea ceremony traditions, as well as the ceramic ware made for it.

    Bongam Temple, Mungyeong Traditional Tea Bowl Festival

    Ceramic artists (28) from all over the world were invited this year (2012) to participate in this festival, and to display their tea bowls and demonstrate their techniques, as well as to join local artists in various activities related to the traditional Tea Bowl ceremonies. Our tea bowls were available for show and sale, and some selected tea bowls were entered into a competition and are now part of the Mungyeong Tea Bowl Museum’s permanent display, alongside the local artists collection. The museum also includes a large studio and teaching center and an impressive traditional Korean Noborigama kiln.

    There were many buildings filled with about 50 local masters and potters, selling traditional or modern artistically interpreted Korean wares. There were of course many buildings holding traditional tea ceremonies, for the casual afternoon sip or a more extended, fully traditional affair.

    We watched artists fire a Noborigama kiln as it has been fired for thousands of years. Local clay and raw materials transformed into wares of the same timelessness as it has been done for centuries. The Mungyeong area is the center of tea bowl making in South Korea and there are many very talented masters, each with his own studio and at times a large display room and even a museum.

    One such artist is Oh Soon-Taek, a self taught ceramicist who originally began his creative endeavors as a painter; he learned the nature of the medium “from the world”. Some of the most striking pieces among his collection were the very small, almost miniature tea sets, each executed with perfect craftsmanship. We were fortunate to join Oh Soon-Taek for tea ceremony on a number of occasions, to see the inherent beauty of his work as it fulfilled its function. He masters a variety of glazes and forms in his collection, leaning more to simple aesthetics, so one can admire the form and function of his meditative work, and appreciate his respect to traditional ware, in spite of the adaptation to modern life. Oh Soon-Taek makes his own clay and glazes from the nature around his house, and he built his own kiln. He sells his work only from his house and workshop and has a solo exhibition once every 10 years.

    Han-Bong Cheon - Intangible Cultural Treasure, Noborigama kiln

    Our hosts went to a great effort to bring us to a number of potteries and kiln sites further spread through the countryside. One such visit was to the studio of Han-Bong Cheon. Our busload of international artists came upon a small, slight man of 80, stocking an enormous Noborigama kiln with the ferocity of a teenage apprentice. Han-Bong Cheon, who became an Intangible Cultural Treasure in 1996, and his daughter Kung Hee Cheon have been making tea ware at their home outside of Mungyeong for 64 years. Tea ceremony has been historically conducted by monks in the Buddhist temples, where Han-Bong Cheon learned and mastered it. Han Bong’s mission was to reintroduce to South Korea the know how of the old Koryo tea bowl tradition, that was at its peak production during the 17th century and was lost during the introduction of mass production.

    He is also considered today as the artist who revived the Maksabal - “Bowl for Anything” - made for all purposes. Koreans use Maksabal as a bowl for water, soup and tea, appreciating its endless and enduring value. In addition, in order to perfect it, he traveled to Japan to learn the making of tea wares from Mr. Tokuro from Setto Mino. Han-Bong Cheon’s work masterfully explores the reserved aesthetics of Korean tea ware. His daughter Kung Hee Cheon displayed and sold both hers and her father’s wares at the festival. Her work adds a feminine touch and an additional dimension to the traditional male craft.

    Another, of many, amazing places we visited was the home, studio, and gallery of Professor Tae-Keun Yoo. Professor Yoo, as we call him, teaches ceramics at the local university, and at most times was accompanied by a group of devoted young potters-students.

    Read More

  • Coming in July: Special feature for the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition at the Denver Art Museum

    This July we will make a special feature for the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition at the Denver Art Museum, which is on view June 11 through September 18, 2011.

    It will include images with the exhibited works and many interviews with the participating artists. You will find all the related content in the Overthrown page.

    Also, the interviews will be featured in our special edition newsletter (will be sent at the end of the month). Subscribe here if you haven’t already.

    Read the preview of the interview with Gwen F. Chanzit, the curator of the exhibition.

    The twenty-five artists in Overthrown: Clay Without Limits took on adventurous challenges to make the works in this exhibition. Most were made especially for Overthrown and many are in direct dialogue with our dynamic Daniel Libeskind-designed architecture; they move beyond the pedestal to the wall, the floor, and even the ceiling. A few extend beyond the Anschutz Gallery, across the entire museum complex. They break boundaries that are physical, technological, conceptual, and spatial.

    Working in all scales, from architecturally expansive to almost impossibly small, the artists in Overthrown employ twenty-first-century technology hand-in-hand with standard modeling and molding techniques. They use digital cameras, computers, laser cutters, 3-D printers, and computer-controlled mills along with more traditional tools.

    Some push the forms of functional objects. Others push the limits of fragility. They take risks that draw on material chemistry and maverick kiln techniques. Some of their works include not only clay, but also found objects such as metal, plastic, and abandoned industrial materials. Overthrowing our expectations of ceramic art—its size, its context, its methods, and its meaning—these artists show us new ways of using this versatile and timeless material.

    Artists:

    Katie Caron
    Nathan Craven
    Benjamin DeMott
    Kim Dickey
    Heather Mae Erickson
    Neil Forrest
    John Gill
    Del Harrow
    Marie T. Hermann
    Tsehai Johnson
    Andrew Martin
    Walter McConnell
    Kristen Morgin
    Mia Mulvey
    Jeanne Quinn
    John Roloff
    Annabeth Rosen
    Anders Ruhwald
    Martha Russo
    Paul Sacaridiz
    Linda Sormin
    Julian Stair
    Brendan Tang
    Cheryl Ann Thomas
    Clare Twomey

    Curator: Gwen F. Chanzit, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art and the Herbert Bayer Collection and Archive

    Location: Anschutz Gallery, Level Two, Hamilton Building / The Denver Art Museum

    The Denver Art Museum is located on 13th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock Streets in downtown Denver. Open Tuesday–Thursday and Saturday Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Friday 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving and Christmas. General admission for Colorado residents: $10 adults, $8 seniors and students, $3 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. Admission for non-Colorado residents: $13 for adults, $10 for seniors and students, $5 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. The Cultural Complex Garage is open; enter from 12th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock or check the DAM website for up-to-date parking information. For information in Spanish, call 720-913-0169. For more information, visit http://www.denverartmuseum.org/ or call 720-865-5000.

  • Overthrown: Clay Without Limits

    Overthrown, Clay Without Limits - The Denver Art MuseumOverthrown: Clay Without Limits brings together regional, national and international artists who push the boundaries of clay to create large-scale installations that respond to the dynamic architecture of the Daniel Libeskind-designed Hamilton Building. The majority of the 25 participating artists will create site-specific artworks. Highlights include a large-scale ceramic and found object sculpture by Linda Sormin that utilizes the colossal, slanted wall in the Hamilton Building atrium; an installation of suspended clay flakes, the largest around 300 pounds, by Neil Forrest; a 23-foot chandelier by Jeanne Quinn; and a tiled enclosure with freestanding elements by Anders Ruhwald. Overthrown also includes a sampling of smaller ceramic objects that acknowledges that other means, besides size, can challenge expectations of the material.

    Exhibition curator: Gwen F. Chanzit, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art and the Herbert Bayer Collection and Archive

    Location: Anschutz Gallery, Level Two, Hamilton Building

    Overthrown: Clay Without Limits is organized by the Denver Art Museum. Significant support is provided by Fred and Jana Bartlit and Vicki and Kent Logan. Additional funding is provided by the Adolph Coors Foundation Exhibition Endowment Fund, the citizens who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District, and the generous donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign. Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine, CBS4, and The Denver Post. Special thanks to the Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative Art.

    The exhibition is part of Marvelous Mud: Clay Around The World exhibition, and it’s on view June 11 through September 18, 2011.

    The Denver Art Museum is located on 13th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock Streets in downtown Denver. Open Tuesday–Thursday and Saturday Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Friday 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving and Christmas. General admission for Colorado residents: $10 adults, $8 seniors and students, $3 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. Admission for non-Colorado residents: $13 for adults, $10 for seniors and students, $5 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. The Cultural Complex Garage is open; enter from 12th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock or check the DAM website for up-to-date parking information. For information in Spanish, call 720-913-0169. For more information, visit http://www.denverartmuseum.org/ or call 720-865-5000.

  • Marvelous Mud: Clay Through the Ages - Exhibition, The Denver Art Museum

    The Denver Art Museum (DAM) takes a closer look at the medium of clay in its summer exhibition Marvelous Mud: Clay Around the World. Celebrating the prolific and diverse material, Marvelous Mud reveals how clay has shaped culture, creativity, science and industry over time and around the globe. The museum-wide exhibition explores one major medium and illustrates its diversity and history through fascinating stories that span time and geographic location. Marvelous Mud is on view June 11 through September 18, 2011, and offers a different way for visitors to experience the DAM’s programs and collections.

    Marvelous Mud features seven exhibitions throughout the Hamilton and North buildings, hands-on and live programming with artists and experts and indoor and outdoor creation stations that allows visitors to discover the medium.

    The exhibition kicks off with a weekend of celebration. Saturday and Sunday will feature lively onsite activities. Ceramic artist Bob Smith will perform a demonstration of raku firing on the plaza. This visual pyrotechnic firing process takes pots from the kiln at maximum temperatures. The pots are then put into containers of sawdust that produce a thick black smoke that adds to the finish of the vessel. Families can also explore the Mud Studio hands-on activity area and participate in artmaking projects at new in-gallery Hotspots.

    Marajó: Ancient Ceramics at the Mouth of the Amazon, located in the Martin and McCormick Gallery on level two of the Hamilton Building, focuses on the elaborately decorated red, white and black earthenware ceramics from the people who occupied the Brazilian island of Marajó from A.D. 400 to 1300. Much of the island is flooded each year by rising river waters, so its inhabitants built large artificial mounds to support dwellings, ceremonial spaces and cemeteries. Adorned in an ornate style with modeled, carved and painted human faces and figures, reptiles, snakes and birds, Marajó ceramics were used for feasting, ceremonial life and funerary offerings. Despite their artistic sophistication, ancient Amazonian ceramics are largely unknown to the public. Marajó is the first exhibition devoted to this topic in the United States. Curated by Margaret Young-Sánchez.

    Overthrown: Clay Without Limits, located primarily in the Anschutz Gallery on level two of the Hamilton Building, brings together regional, national and international artists who push the boundaries of clay to create large-scale installations that respond to the dynamic architecture of the Daniel Libeskind-designed Hamilton Building. The majority of the 25 participating artists will create site-specific artworks. Highlights include a large-scale ceramic and found object sculpture by Linda Sormin that utilizes the colossal slanted wall in the Hamilton Building atrium; an installation of clay flakes, each around 300 pounds, by Neil Forrest; a 23-foot chandelier by Jeanne Quinn; and a tiled enclosure with freestanding elements by Anders Ruhwald. Overthrown also includes a sampling of smaller ceramic objects that acknowledges that other means, besides size, can challenge expectations of the material. Curated by Gwen Chanzit.

    Blue and White: A Ceramic Journey, located in the William Sharpless Jackson Jr. Gallery on level five of the North Building, conveys the popularity of blue-and-white pottery throughout the centuries in different parts of the world. The technique of creating blue-and-white ceramics was a great innovation of Chinese ceramic history and they became a vital component of China’s export trade. The exhibit will feature objects from early periods of blue-and-white ceramic production to present day examples.

    Dirty Pictures, located in the Delisa and Anthony Mayer Gallery on level seven of the North Building, shows the varied ways photographers have depicted mud in their work. Whether as media for photographic construction, as the substance of metaphor or as a mark of human interaction with the earth—mud, clay, dirt and soil have made prominent appearances in the work of many photographers in the past 35 years. Featuring pieces by artists including Dieter Appelt, Zeke Berman, Jungjin Lee and Joel Sternfield, this exhibition aims to both examine these differences and draw connections between the varied uses of these materials in contemporary photography.

    Focus: Earth and Fire, located primarily on level four of the Hamilton Building, showcases ceramic work in the DAM’s modern and contemporary art collection, as well as paintings that respond to earth and fire. In recognizing that there are as many ways of responding to earth and fire as there are creative ventures, our presentation takes the widest approach to this theme and celebrates the myriad of artistic responses to rugged mountains, powerful mudslides and volcanoes, blazing forest fires and even the hot sunlight pouring down from billions of miles away. Work by Colorado artist Vance Kirkland will be featured in the third level Chambers and Grant Gallery, showing the artist’s early watercolor scenes from nature, as well as his late paintings that responded to the sublime energy of heat, fire and the great mysteries of space. Curated by Gwen Chanzit.

    Mud to Masterpiece: Mexican Colonial Ceramics, located on level four of the North Building, explores the era of global trade and its effect on traditional Mexican earthenware, Chinese porcelain and Mexican majolica. Between 1521 and 1821, the ancient Mexican ceramic art of unglazed, low-fired earthenware was exported to Spain where it became quite fashionable. In return, Spanish artists introduced the potter’s wheel and high-fired hard glazes to Mexico, producing a pottery known as majolica. Trade brought Chinese porcelain to Mexico and its decorative motifs influenced both native earthenware and Mexican majolica. More than 30 pieces of Chinese porcelain, Mexican earthenware and Mexican majolica will be exhibited alongside Mexican colonial paintings that depict the use of ceramics in daily life. Curated by Donna Pierce.

    Potters of Precision: The Coors Porcelain Company, located on level two of the North Building, displays porcelain labware produced by the Golden, Colo., company. The Coors Porcelain Company, now known as CoorsTek, creates specialized scientific forms—crucibles, beakers, evaporating dishes—that have remained virtually unchanged since their earliest iteration. Beauty and function exist simultaneously in vessels that serve scientists’ precisely stated needs. Curated by Darrin Alfred.

    Marvelous Mud is organized by the Denver Art Museum. Exhibition support is provided by the Adolph Coors Foundation Exhibition Endowment Fund, the citizens who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District and the generous donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign. Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine, CBS4 and The Denver Post.

    The Denver Art Museum is located on 13th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock Streets in downtown Denver. Open Tuesday–Thursday and Saturday Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Friday 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving and Christmas. General admission for Colorado residents: $10 adults, $8 seniors and students, $3 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. Admission for non-Colorado residents: $13 for adults, $10 for seniors and students, $5 for visitors 6-18, free for children 5 and younger. The Cultural Complex Garage is open; enter from 12th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock or check the DAM website for up-to-date parking information. For information in Spanish, call 720-913-0169. For more information, visit http://www.denverartmuseum.org/ or call 720-865-5000.

  • » Don't forget to subscribe to our monthly newsletter

    Our second newsletter will be sent in just one week!

    It will feature interviews with ceramic artists Margrieta Jeltema, Carol Gouthro, Shane Porter, plus a new artist from The Netherlands. Photographer Jonathan Vanderweit from Denver, Colorado will also be interviewed for the newsletter.

    → View our featured ceramic artists list (posts).
    Like our Facebook page if you want to stay in touch with us.

    Subscribe now!

  • All work is copyright of respective owner, otherwise © 2014 Ceramics Now. Website powered by Tumblr.