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artist

Taking Roots II: Haejung Lee / New Taipei City Yingge Ceramics Museum, Taiwan

Taking Roots Haejung Lee Solo Exhibition at Ceramics Park Gallery, New Taipei City Yingge Ceramics Museum

Taking Roots II: Haejung Lee / Ceramics Park Gallery, New Taipei City Yingge Ceramics Museum, Taiwan
February 24 - April 8, 2012

"Everyone, even animals and plants, accustoms to new environments and new circumstances as time goes by. In order to understand and get used to a new environment, one only needs time. My previous work was about figuring out my identity, understanding different cultures and establishing myself in new environments (the transition from Korea to America). I am now in a constant process of adjusting new situations as a female artist, a wife and further more - as a mom. I want to present my Korean cultural background through new objects that illustrate the natural and architectural landscape." Hae-Jung Lee

Korean born Haejung Lee received her first Master of Fine Art concentrating on ceramics at Kyung Hee University in South Korea in 2002 and a second master’s degree in ceramics at Louisiana State University in 2008. She has been an Artist-in-residence at The Banff Centre in Canada and at Guldagergård-International Ceramic Research Center in Denmark in 2003 and 2004. She presents her work internationally and has been awarded several remarkable prizes such as best of show, award of distinction, silver prize as well as others in both Korea and USA. In summer 2009 she participated in the 5th World Ceramic Biannual Show Korea (CEBIKO) and directed the exhibition “Affinity” which also included many American ceramic artists.

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  • Bogdan Teodorescu

    Bogdan Teodorescu Romanian Ceramics

    Bogdan Teodorescu's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

    “It seems like I’m always trapped in a style beyond a heterogeneous appearance of my work. It isn’t bad advertising, but if you really want to feel a connection with my works, you need to be patient and to look closely to more than twenty images. And perhaps contrary to my statement, my style wouldn’t be so difficult understand. Everywhere there is a sort of a struggle between fantasy and at least one kind of realism. I also admit that the manner is as important as the idea itself. Some say that the substance of a style is nowadays just a literary, philosophical concern - mostly when it has something to do with the more popular social involvement. I think that someone’s style doesn’t have to be interconnected with anything social and one can always choose to seek for inspiration in its inner self.

    As far as I can say at this moment, my experience with ceramics has two aspects (or constraints). First is the period of apprenticeship, which numbers the last year of my high-school and the years in the University of Arts and Design in Cluj. The other one is my collaboration with Wagner Porcelains. If high-school was rather a period of independence - ceramics was a very late decision. The academic years were a continuous fight with a conservatory approach and, sometimes more frustrating, with the lack of technical possibilities. With Wagner, the limitations went only in the commercial direction. Despite all of this, I totally agree with (some) constraints, which can provide a wide range of surprising solutions.

    My porcelain works have a high decorative touch, more in the sense of fashion with all its aspects. Collages and technical varieties are also present in my work, replacing the limitation of the material. With Wagner I only work with white porcelain, though adding my pictures. I am not trying to follow any precise trend, nor Romanian or International; I am only constantly paying attention to everything interesting and meaningful around me.” Bogdan Teodorescu

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  • Kimberly Cook

    Kimberly Cook Contemporary Ceramics on Ceramics Now Magazine

    Kimberly Cook's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    “Awkward primitive animal instincts lie unconsciously in our genetic make-up.  Dominance, survival, reproduction, and group instinct feed our propensity to digress into our egos; cruelty, alpha status, fight or flight, sexual exploits, and pack mentality.  In my body of work I create imagery that embodies tension and anxiety, while also reflecting animalistic traits and certain elements of human ritualistic thought and control that intrigue me.  Using clay as my primary sculptural material allows me to explore these thoughts and questions using techniques that actually originated in human ritualistic practices.  Figures, deities, and fetishes were modeled into both animal and human form for magical or religious practices long before clay was used for utilitarian ware.  This harnessing of imagery deemed as powerful has survived for centuries, allowing humans to access manifestations of supernatural forces believed to improve their daily struggles in life. 

    Personally and intuitively driven, my work with imagery of animals is grounded in the exploration of the universal human condition, focusing on aspects of the ceremonial; serving as embodiments for the physical, spiritual, and psychological being. My preoccupation with human existence, alienation, fear and apathy, is what motivates me to express elements of autobiography, ritual, and the significance of life’s struggles.  Working between narrative and abstract, revealing both the perception of power and powerlessness, the figures and symbols that I create are often purposely rendered disfigured and dysfunctional.” Kimberly Cook

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  • Paula Bellacera

    Paula Bellacera Ceramics

    Paula Bellacera's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    “All my life I have been fascinated with form and color. During my youth I watched my mother dabble in various art media; eventually she settled on ceramics. Inspired by her explorations I struck out on my own. I focused on the two-dimensional plane first with photography, then painting, and finally printmaking. Recently I began attending a community Raku night where I discovered my true joy is interacting with clay and creating three-dimensional forms. The spontaneity and plasticity of the medium makes handbuilding a process of discovery - full of surprises. My approach is a collaboration where the clay and I work together to discover hidden shapes and reveal emotions and personalities through animal forms.

    Just as friends and acquaintances have their own distinctive traits and behaviors, each of my sculpted animals has personality and expresses a unique character. When people step into my world (via studio or gallery), they often smile and chuckle as they recognize a bit of themselves, their pets, friends or family members in the postures and expressions of my sculptures. In this work, my intention is to present the best of humanity through our animal friends and to help us laugh and love our differences and ourselves.” Paula Bellacera

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  • Jean-François Fouilhoux / Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France

    Jean-François Fouilhoux, stoneware sculpture exhibition Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France

    Jean-François Fouilhoux, stoneware sculpture / Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France
    17th March - 17th June 2012

    Opening reception: Saturday, March 17th, 5.00pm

    I love clay.
    I’m always moved to see the mark made by my fingers in soil.
    Clay remembers their lightest touch and retains the slightest motion transmitted to it.
    The mildest inflection – or even hesitation – leaves its trace.
    It is a recorder of emotions. Hasn’t a scientist said that given the right tools, one could hear the sounds generated in the studio when a pot is being thrown because they are etched into its surface, like the first recordings of voices on wax cylinders? This highly singular property of clay is all the richer because the firing sets these marks and preserves their traces.
    Like the wall of a cave and pigment, or paper and pencil, clay engages with the hands and the body.
    I write in the soil.
    My pencil? A flexible blade that I bend at will. My medium? A wall of clay.
    I sketch in space by drawing the blade through the wall and slicing into its thickness.
    The line is a continuous one, just as with writing, and the volume takes form blindly, as imagined by the gesture.
    The form is then composed of two interlocking elements, separated by a small gap.
    We could say that each is a mould or an impression of the other, with a space that Marcel Duchamp defined as being ‘infra-thin’. They are born of the same gesture: the trace left by the motion of the flexible blade is all that ultimately interests me.
    I then sacrifice one of the two parts, which I destroy to allow the impression of the gesture to appear.
    Traces of energy, of tension… Like a calligrapher, I have meditated on the gesture before executing it. It is a sort of dance or ritual in which the movement is expansive, dynamic, continuous and without regrets.The goal is freeing up the sensitive impression, after a privileged moment, by emptying its material content and reducing it to a skin,
    then bringing it to life as if suspended in the void… and simply capturing the energy of the gesture expressed in space…
    This is yet another story of fullness and emptiness, which is recurrent in ceramics. It is also the story of celadon – translucent – another symbol for completeness and void: both matter and light.

    Jean-François Fouilhoux

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  • Debra Fleury

    Debra Fleury Contemporary Ceramics

    Debra Fleury's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    “While growing up near the ocean, I spent many hours peering at tiny creatures and looking for clues to their secret lives. This began a lifelong passion for the the minute details, the battered fragments, and the myriad patterns of organic life. The smallest bits of bone or shell would ignite intense curiosity and imaginative leaps; What was this creature? What did it look like? How did it die? Did it have a family, a home, or friends? Did it feel or think? What would it have thought of me? I create sculptural objects in an empathetic attempt to gain insight into the inner life of creatures and I seek to spark curiosity and imaginative leaps in the viewer.

    Clay is critical to exploring these ideas. Touching clay and responding to its organic properties are key aspects of my largely exploratory and intuitive creative process. Risk taking and pushing materials to their limits is also important. I experiment with the forces used to shape clay, glaze, and glass as a process for imagining and exploring the effects of natural forces. I combine clays with glass or other materials to see what they reveal about their individual properties when they are fused together.” Debra Fleury

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  • Cindy Billingsley

    Cindy Billingsley Contemporary Ceramic sculptures on Ceramics Now

    Cindy Billingsley's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    Art should come from the heart of the artist, it should engage the audience, it should connect with the community, it should start a dialog, a debate. It should get people to look at things in a way they have not thought of, or to see what they have looked at but not really seen. Art has to come deeply from the artist, there has to be raw emotion and honesty in the work if it is to connect with people. An Artist paints and sculpts what they know. These are all the reasons I wanted to do a show about Alzheimer’s disease. To start a dialog, to connect, to get people to understand what it is like to have the disease, it is a part of my life, so it is what I know, what I am around. I took those thoughts and feelings and transformed them into visuals to engage my audience.
    I speak through paint and clay. Art is a look inside the artist, what I am feeling is transferred into the clay while I am sculpting, Those feelings have to go somewhere. I wanted to tell a story, I wanted you to feel how it is, the frustrations, humor, the compassion and the heartache of having Alzheimer’s disease and for the ones caring for one with this disease.

    William Faulkner said it best ~ The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it it moves again since it is life.

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  • Teresa & Helena Jané

    Teresa and Helena Jane Contemporary ceramic design

    THJané's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View their works

    “10 Years of art and skill. From the idea to action and from this to the final product is a long and arduous journey for four hands.

    We create and produce contemporary pieces with message.
    Devoutly, seriously, exclusively, dangerously, carefully and - why not say it? - perfectly. Pieces that tell universal or personal stories, sad or happy ones, with horror by the easy effect, the déjà vu or the vain brightness.
    Common denominator is almost always the ceramic and the pursuit of happy marriage between tradition and innovation.
    Playing with fire is a tough one …

    Those who closely follow this trip: Continue with us!
    To those who have just arrived: Welcome!” THJané

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  • Ceramic Artist Residency at Core Clay, Cincinnati, OH, USA

    Ceramic Artist Residency at Core Clay, Cincinnati, OH, USA

    Ceramic Artist Residency at Core Clay, Cincinnati, OH, USA

    We are a ceramic Artist Residency program that is formatted in a work exchange manner. Resident is provided with an apartment directly next door to the studio, RENT FREE in exchange for a certain number of hours of work per week in the studio. Artist in Residence opportunities include monthly clay outings, studio critiques, clay supplies at cost during residency, free attendance at visiting artist workshops, opportunities to participate in sales at Core Clay as well as opportunities for additional income in exchange for labor beyond the original contract hours. And a free large, designated studio space.

    Core Clay is a privately owned clay studio with 40+ artists sharing space. We house a sculpting studio for a mannequin prototype sculptor and a retail space for clay supply. We host workshops with nationally known andlocal artists. Each of these areas interacts with the artists in residence.

    The goal of the Artist in Residence program is to provide an opportunity in an artists community for clay artists at the beginning of their careers to get a start as full time professional artists.

    Artist in Residence Application:
    - A portfolio of 20 shots of work (printed, on disc, or slide, we’re not picky)
    - Recommendations from 3 ceramic artists or instructors
    - A brief statement of goals and objectives to work toward during residency. What do you expect from your experience?
    - Fill out this application
    - Put all these into an envelope and send it to:
    Core Clay, Attn: Laura Davis, 2533 Gilbert Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45206

    Contact
    Laura Davis
    513-961-2728
    laura@coreclay.com

    Above: Lady Clementine, Mixed Media, 2011, by Jamie R. Muenzer, Artist in Residence at Core Clay 2012

  • Interview with Brian Kakas - Artist of the month, January 2012

    Interview with ceramic artist Brian Kakas - Artist of the month, January 2012

    → Subscribe to our monthly newsletter if you want to receive news and interviews with ceramic artists.
    → The full interview with Brian Kakas is featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two.

    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : There is visible consistency in your creation. What was the starting point in your investigation with ceramic art?

    Brian Kakas: The starting for my works comes from the traditional vessel and understanding the primary elements in design. I have taken the elements of the foot, body and lip of a pot and applied them as more structural elements within my sculptural designs. Development of a language within these components has allowed the works to maintain continuity through the progression of forms. The works become more refined as I focus on transitions of lines and volume. Complexity in the structures, are inspired from marine life, geological formations, buildings, bridge design and armor. With the creation of all my works I try to stay true to the inherent properties of the materials. 

    Your works reveal a very rigorous methodology. Tell us more about the process of constructing them. Do you make preliminary drawings?

    I used to draw blueprints for my pottery and sculptures. But the works always seemed to lose something in the translation from 2D to 3D. I think the spontaneity of the sketch and energy never quite translated. Once I began using slump and drapes molds I began to only sketch gestural drawings with ink. This allowed me take an idea (not a concrete design) and began to find new forms through exploring hidden lines within objects while only maintaining the idea of the gesture. I apply the gestural line I am looking for onto the X, Y and Z axis of the object in order to maintain flow and control of the entire 3 dimensional space it occupies. I am working with a modular mold system, which allows me to create an inventory of parts to pick and choose from freely. This system allows me to maintain being in a “state of art” while exploring new forms. The sculptures are hollow and all have an inherent strength as I complete lines whether circular or elliptical, symmetrical or asymmetrical. Then I construct a lip on the vessels using armature, just like ribs in an airplane wing or in a boat hull. The ribs create a template to be covered with slabs, which accentuates the forms I have already created. The tensile strength of this element keeps the hollow forms from warping or moving during the firing process.

    Brian Kakas - Contemporary Ceramic Sculptures

    Architectonics – Hull Improv, side view, 2011. White stoneware, slab built, 38”L x 18”W x 17”H, Cone 04 Oxidation - View his works

    Tell us more about large scale fabrication. Taking the size into consideration, have you confronted with some particular technological problems?

    I found through many accidents, the importance of the foundation you build on.  There were many cracking issues early on in the high arches of the sculptures. I thought it was uneven displacement of weight that could be resolved by building additional supports that were fired with the works. But with continual cracking at the point of the supports I began reviewing the overall movement of the pieces throughout the shrinkage stages, from cone 04 to cone 10 the problems were the same.

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  • Interview with Marianne McGrath - Ceramic Installation, January 2012

    Interview with ceramic artist Marianne McGrath - Ceramic Installation, January 2012

    → Subscribe to our monthly newsletter if you want to receive news and interviews with ceramic artists.
    → The full interview with Marianne McGrath is featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two.

    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : Before starting a career in ceramics you studied Biology. In relation to your line of work, how would you characterize the relationship between Biology and Ceramics?

    Marianne McGrath: I believe my study of biology helped create the artist I am today: one that works by questioning what surrounds me, and by creating objects based on observation in a very systematic manner. Artists, like biologists, work from direct observation and immersion in the environment around them, and are forever attempting to interpret this world.
    Both groups employ creative means to achieve this. I grew up on a farm in Southern California, one my family had farmed for four generations, surrounded by this natural world that was under the direct manipulation of the human hand to serve human needs. I believe I was drawn to study biology in college because growing up immersed in this agrarian landscape and was incredibly interested in the idea that we, as humans, have this ability to define, control, and use the natural world that surrounds us, yet we also have an imperative responsibility as a species to maintain this world.

    In my final semester in college, I took a ceramics class, the first art class I had ever formally taken. I was immediately overwhelmed by the questions I found artists asking, by the responses that they drew from their audience, and the simple fact that they were using dirt, one of the most basic components of the natural world, to create. This type of communication and way of thinking drew me in and I decide to completely change the direction of my life. I found that my voice was much more attuned to express my concerns of the livelihood of the natural world through the means of art than through my study of biology.

    In the studio today, I find myself working in much of the same manner as I used to in the biology lab: trying to find the answer to a particular question. I also recognize my history as a student of biology in my draw to clay’s ability to be manipulated at all levels of its creation, whether its in the mixing and altering of a slip, or in the potential of atmospheric firings. I use this characteristic of clay as the basis of communication in my works.
    Marianne McGrath Contemporary Ceramics
    What I See, What I Saw II, 2011, unfired earthenware, plywood, steel rod, wax, 4’h x 10’l x 20’x
    - View her works

    You use unconventional techniques in very interesting ways, like unfired earthenware and wax. Tell us more about these methods and the creation process.

    The medium of clay itself creates a very heavy material metaphor. Artists, I believe, are drawn to it for it’s malleability, its ability to record the touch of the human hand, and the sense of permanence it retains once fired. Unfired clay, especially at the bone-dry stage, is incredibly fragile and ephemeral-it can be dissolved or broken down immediately. The impermanence that clay retains at this stage struck me as incredibly meaningful, and I thus employed it to convey the meaning that I wished for in my work.

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  • Interview with Deborah Britt - Spotlight, January 2012

    Interview with ceramic artist Deborah Britt - Spotlight, January 2012

    → Subscribe to our monthly newsletter if you want to receive news and interviews with ceramic artists.
    → The full interview with Deborah Britt is featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two.

    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : You are in this field for more than ten years now; when exactly did it all start? Tell us how you discovered the passion for ceramics.

    Deborah Britt: My passion for ceramics came rather late. Having been born and raised on a farm in Northwest Missouri, far away from big city influences, exposure to the arts was minimal. Art classes in my small-town school were non-existent past grade school—with a student body of 60 students in grades 1 through 12, resources were focused on the practical skills and knowledge essential to a farming community.

    My interest in the arts began in college, where I was first exposed to fine arts through an Art Appreciation course. After earning a degree in Business, and subsequently a Masters Degree, I was firmly entrenched in the corporate world. The spark that ignited my interest in art, however, continued to smolder, but it wasn’t until I witnessed a wheel-throwing demonstration at a local art fair that my desire to delve into clay became real. After 13 years in business, I returned to school with a whole-hearted desire to master the art and craft of clay, ultimately earning a BFA degree in Ceramics. I have never looked back.


    Deborah Britt Pottery -Ceramics

    Blue Pitcher Set, 8” x 13”, Wheel-Thrown and Altered, Salt-Fired Porcelain with Slip and Glaze Decoration, Cone Ten, 2011 - View Deborah Britt’s works

    You are mostly creating pottery pieces. How would you explain your attraction for functional ceramics?

    I was initially attracted to the wheel. Learning to throw basic utilitarian forms was a joy to me.  The tactile sensation of wet clay is so seductive! However, there are some ideas that cannot be conveyed by functional pots, thus I also do sculptural work. I like the idea of making work that is approachable both on an intimate and intellectual level.
    Making functional work appeals to the part of me that wants to connect personally with the user. I love the idea that the work will be handled, and I strive to make work that goes beyond the basic utilitarian form. In other words, I strive to make the work “special” for the user, in an effort to elevate the mundane, e.g., drinking a cup of tea, into the conscious enjoyment of the daily ritual, rather than a routine act.

    I love to play with form, so even in my functional work I like to bring in a sculptural sensibility. The functional and sculptural forms play off each other—one idea leads to the next—so for me, the back and forth of sculptural vs. functional is essential.

    —- The full interview will be featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two.


    There is a remarkable touch of sensibility in your decorations. Tell us more about how you decorate and where do you get inspiration from.

    I am intrigued by the fact that we as humans are so connected to the earth, from the food we eat to the ceramic cup we drink from. I am drawn to relatively matte surfaces, perhaps because of their tactile nature or maybe because of their relationship to nature itself.

    I want the clay to look like clay, and have been drawn to the salt firing process because of the ability to let the beauty of the clay body speak for itself as it fuses with salt. The element of surprise that arises from firing to firing with the phenomenon of flashing and variation of salt distribution has always held great interest for me.

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