Arlene Shechet: Meissen Recast / RISD Museum, Providence, USA

Arlene Shechet's Meissen Recast exhibition at RISD Museum

Arlene Shechet: Meissen Recast / RISD Museum, Providence, USA
January 17 – July 6, 2014

In the first U.S. exhibition of her one-of-a-kind Meissen sculptures, Arlene Shechet presents works she produced during a recent artist residency at the world-renowned German porcelain manufacturer. Arlene Shechet: Meissen Recast is a two-part exhibition on view at the RISD Museum from January 17 to July 6, 2014.

It is the utilitarian factory casts behind fine porcelain production, rather than the ornate ceramic confections, that inform Shechet’s “Meissen” series. Her range of sculpture brings to the fore the seams, plate impressions, indentations, inventory numbers, and other evidence of the industrial process that an 18th-century Meissen craftsman would have sought to erase. Almost every sculpture on view in the Museum’s Upper Farago Gallery is derived from one or more of 47 historic Meissen mold patterns, reconceived in unanticipated combinations of forms and scale. Shechet’s complete reinstallation of the Museum’s historic Meissen collection of figurines and tableware in the Porcelain Gallery completes the two-part show—connecting the past and present, fine arts and decorative arts.

“The Museum is excited to present this compelling new work by RISD alumna Arlene Shechet,” says John W. Smith, director of the RISD Museum. “Meissen Recast extends the Museum’s long and groundbreaking tradition of encouraging artists to use the collection—dating from Andy Warhol’s Raid the Icebox (1970) to Spencer Finch’s Painting Air exhibition (2012). By moving some of RISD’s Meissen figures—including the famous Monkey Band—from their normal location in the Porcelain Gallery to the contemporary Upper Farago Gallery and, conversely, inserting her own porcelain sculptures into the cases of the more traditional, wood-paneled room, she heightens our awareness and appreciation for the refined historical pieces and her own more organic, intuitive approach.”

Adjunct RISD Museum curator and exhibition organizer Judith Tannenbaum adds, “Arlene Shechet has become well known for ceramic sculpture that reveals the nature of her materials and working process. By casting fine porcelain in the Meissen factory’s forms designed for plaster, she makes fine porcelain objects out of industrial molds. The surprise is that by looking behind the scenes of this luxury production, which once represented a high-water mark in culture, she has created a body of work that is virtuosic in entirely contemporary terms.”

During her 2012-2013 residency at the Meissen Manufactory, Shechet gained access to all areas of the renowned production facility—working alongside Meissen artisans, learning their techniques, using their tools, and observing the company’s internal traditions. “If there is a common thread in these works, it is my desire to leave a remnant of the memory of the factory. So if a screw is there, I might have cast it along with a fingerprint—I find these inadvertent traces to be beautiful and also thrilling, because they show the original thought that went into the porcelain making and, perhaps, even something of the worker,” the artist explains.

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David Hicks: Nucleus / Cross MacKenzie Gallery, Washington DC

David Hicks: Nucleus at Cross MacKenzie Gallery, Washington DC

David Hicks: Nucleus / Cross MacKenzie Gallery, Washington DC
January 10 - February 28, 2014

Cross MacKenzie Gallery is pleased to present “Nucleus” an exhibition of new ceramic sculpture by the prolific and compelling California based artist, David Hicks. This is his third solo show at our gallery.

“I am still digging in the dirt to understand my attraction to the agricultural,” the artist says of this new body of work. Though Hicks continues in these botanic and organic themes, his compositions have opened up and become less dense – no longer hanging down with the force of gravity from vertical wires. The new work is metaphorically blossoming. His array of gourd-like shapes of various textures, hues and dimensions are now suspended from a metal armature fixed to the wall, projecting outward like sconces, flower-like, hovering in space. 

In her 2013 review of Hicks’ 2011 exhibition, “Farewell” at our gallery for Ceramic Art and Perception, Janet Koplos described Hicks’ sculpture; “the works are wonderfully sensuous abstractions (as all pottery can be) and are especially appealing for both color and texture”.

Every element is unique and unfamiliar, inhabiting a place in one’s imagination between associations: at once a cantaloupe or pear, then a beached bouy, an insect pod, a bird’s nest or an exotic dirt encrusted seed. Koplos describes the density of Hicks’ previous work; “But the numbers, the depth of accumulation and the softly worn surfaces hint that they have been retired and frugally held in reserve. It is a library of objects”. Though the artist still draws from that library, the new presentation is more precious, now demanding examination and appreciation for the individual elements rather than focusing the viewer’s attention on the clustered mass. The ceramic forms are one-by-one lovingly harnessed into fitted brackets, more akin to diamond settings now than the sinkers on fishing lines of the past. Even with the artist’s fresh approach and careful selection, his paring down on the amount of objects in the sculptures, Hicks is far from being a minimalist. His wall pieces continue the artist’s themes of nature’s abundance and excess, the forces of bearing fruit and multiplying.

The sense of planting seeds is even more obvious in the two pedestal pieces in the show that sit tree-like with a central weighted stalk, branching out with the ceramic forms perched on and suspended from the metal limbs. We are tempted with the tactile rawness, to pick the heavy fruit before it drops.

David Hicks received his B.F.A. from California State University, Long Beach, CA. and his M.F.A. from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. His work is in several prominent collections including the World Ceramic Museum, Icheon, Korea, the American Museum of Ceramic Art–AMOCO, Pomona CA, the American Embassy in Figi through the State Department’s, Art in Embassies program and the Arizona State University Art Museum in Tempe, AZ. He lives and works in Visalia CA. with his wife and new baby daughter.

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Gareth Mason: More is more / Jason Jacques Gallery, New York

Gareth Mason More is more at Jason Jacques Gallery, New York

Gareth Mason: More is more / Jason Jacques Gallery, New York
January 22 - February 22, 2014

Opening: Thursday, January 22, from 6-9 pm.

We are very excited to invite you to our newest exhibition with our first contemporary master ceramicist Gareth Mason. Following a show at the American Museum of Ceramic Art and an exhibition at the Korea Cultural Center in London. Gareth will be having his second solo exhibition at Jason Jacques Gallery. We are Publishing a 200 page catalog of Gareth’s work and the first publication of a series of letters between Gareth Mason and Ceramics collector Richard Jacobs which is a discourse of the nature of art and ceramics collecting. We are planning a series of lectures between Gareth Mason and his favorite Collector Richard Jacobs more information in the new year.

Gareth Mason new sculptural vessels are inspired by humanity’s connection to fire “Fire is humanity’s muse. Since the earliest humans pondered the nature of the sun, fire has captivated us with its mysterious force. Hominid fire — progenitor of dreams — spur to our noblest and most terrifying achievements, key to our aspirations and inextricable from the survival of our race, it burns literally and metaphorically in a place distinct from all other stimuli and matter. No wonder then that fire holds such creative potency for the human brain; as we gaze into its depths we ever behold a power of poetic and epic proportions. Of all the arts; silicate, ferric, kinetic, dramatic, sonic, plastic; of whatever place in the assumed hierarchy of creative genres, ceramics offers a unique spotlight on this most potent element. Through ceramics, it is possible to ‘fire’ the imagination and the spirit because ceramic metamorphosis is redolent of human experience. This belief underpins all my ceramic work. The igneous fusion of materials is analogous to human emotion. This is fertile ground for creative exploration and discovery.

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Betül Demir Karakaya & Gökçe Özer: 1+1 / Terakki Foundation Art Gallery, Istanbul

Betul Demir Karakaya and Gokce Ozer 1+1 at Terakki Art Gallery Istanbul

Betül Demir Karakaya & Gökçe Özer: 1+1 / Terakki Foundation Art Gallery, Istanbul
January 9 - February 8, 2014

"Suddenly a voice is heard from 1+1…
One is quiet, whereas two is loud. 1+1 represents something more than a simple mathematical equation and the solution to this equation “2” is more than a number. It is an option against singularity.

The ceramic work of Betül Demir Karakaya and Gökçe Özer show us how different ones can add up to “2”. Özer’s ceramic sculptures portraying small heads on twirling bodies with hearts that have turned into black buttons carry the signs of a quiet but threatening power, while sculptures with open mouths, made using the same technique, create a place to hide from this threat. Whereas Demir’s ceramic bells give the signals of giving up an artist’s competence. With the game,she has extended an invitation to the audience by presenting a way to speak with them. Soil, that has been the common heritage of human kind, accumulates with a voice from two different languages in two female artists’ hands.

Ceramic works of Özer and Demir that have chosen two’s dynamism, instead of the competence of one -that isolates, makes blind and fattens- and two’s dialogue, instead of one’s monologue, will meet its audience at Terakki Art.” Words by Hazal Aksoy

Betül Demir Karakaya was born in 1978 in Izmir-Turkey, and started art education at Stragonov Moscow State University of Industrial and Applied Arts in 1998. Graduated from Hacettepe University Fine Arts Faculty Ceramics Department in 2002. In 2010 she has concluded her MFA at Anadolu University Institute of Fine Arts with the theme “Ceramic Bells Throughout History”. She is writing her PhD thesis at the same institute. She has many art pieces at private and public collections, including MIC Faenza International Ceramic Museum. She works at Karatekin University Fine Arts Faculty Ceramics Department as a lecturer.

Gökçe Özer was born in 1984 in Afyon. In 2002, she graduated from Ankara Anatolian High School of Fine Arts, Department of Painting, and in 2010 she graduated from Anadolu University Faculty of Fine Arts Ceramics Department. She studied as an exchange student between 2009-2010 at Universitat zu Köln. Presently she is working as a research assistant at Anadolu University Faculty of Fine Arts ceramic department and studied MA at the Institute of Fine Arts on ‘Influence of Wabi-sabi Aesthetic on Japanese Ceramic Art’. Currently she is a PhD candidate at Anadolu University Institute of Fine Arts.

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Jos Devriendt: Day & Night / Pierre Marie Giraud, Bruxelles

Jos Devriendt: Day and Night exhibition Pierre Marie Giraud, Bruxelles

Jos Devriendt: Day & Night / Pierre Marie Giraud, Bruxelles
January 17 - February 1, 2014

"Since 20 years I have been working on the archetype of the mushroom. It has been a search for a form that could be a sculpture with two different lives. A mushroom during daytime with an obvious and colourful expression capturing the light, and at night an abstract form giving light.

As a sculptor I want to reshape the form from day to night, solely with light: the daylight, which shines upon the sculpture and the artificial light, which comes from within and erases the material form. After researching the form, I experimented with different colours as a means to alter the meaning of the form. Like abstract painters use colours to give a meaning to their work, I do in a three dimensional way.
 
Artists have been expressing feelings through the sea, nudes or geometric forms.
Why not use mushrooms?
They have a lot of meaning in life.
Basically you can eat them and may be poisoned.
There is the hallucinating effect of some of the exotic species.
The sexual connotation of the mushroom is in many cultures an important element of mythology.
In essence, mushrooms bring me to the big themes of art: life, love and death, and last but not least to humour.”

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By Degrees ceramics exhibition / Unit Gallery, Jockey Club Creative Arts Centre, Hong Kong

By Degrees ceramics exhibition / L5-23 Unit Gallery, Jockey Club Creative Arts Centre, Hong Kong
January 11-26, 2014

Ceramics has come a long way since its’ humble beginnings as crude decorations and simple pottery wares thousands of years ago. It has evolved to become an important medium within the world of the Fine and Decorative Arts whereby its’ previous boundaries are constantly being pushed and our perceptions challenged.

In learning how to make ceramics there are no short cuts however and the techniques and skills still have to be mastered step by step, and by degrees. This exhibition brings together the six students of The Hong Kong Art School after completing the first year of their BA in Fine Art (Ceramics). Using hand building techniques and wheel thrown work they endeavor to explore various different themes within Contemporary Ceramics some of which include minimalism, eternity and social issues. This is their inaugural exhibition together.

Exhibited artists:

Ryan Cheng Ceramics

Ryan Cheng, Weight Never Sleeps, 2013, Stoneware (Black Mountain - partly glazed), 16x9x30 cm.

Ryan Cheng
Clay is a very natural and organic medium to work with. It lends itself well to manipulation on a human scale.  It requires no specialized tools or incredible strength and is a pleasure to work with using just your bare hands. In my work I enjoy exploring the strengths and limits of the clay, and I try to use this ancient material to create objects in context with modernity.

Renita Cheung Ceramics

Renita Cheung, Live as One, 2013, Unglazed Porcelain, Stoneware mixed with Oxides, 36x36x60 cm.

Renita Cheung
Diversity is a natural phenomenon in nature and gives the world variety and beauty. Such a beauty also exists in mankind as we have different characteristics such as color and culture. But for us to live together peacefully without discrimination, war and terrorism requires awareness from all the human races to appreciate and accept differences.

In the work ‘Live as One’, I invite tenants of the earth to appreciate and respect differences between human races in order to sustain peace. Mountains of different characteristics are used to represent people from different culture as well as their hardiness to be moved. But all dreams start with imagination. I hope someday you will join the line.

Janice Ng Ceramics

Janice Ng, Infinity, 2013, Porcelain and Stoneware (unglazed), Size variable.

Janice Ng
I am inspired by ceramic artists such as Eva Hild and Walter Dam and became interested in the flow and movement of forms. With the combination of extrusion technique, I build some angular tubs, and the development starts from free standing distorted tubes to additional force and movements.

The extrusion resembles the birth of living beings, the clay being used would be the origin while the twist and pressure added afterward would symbolize the experiences and crisis the piece had gone through along the growth. Twisted movement is applied since the DNA link of living being in spiral form, it gives signs of the power of life.

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Graciela Olio Ceramics: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series), 2011, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with laser decal on raw sheet before handbuilding, all 30x20x0,8 cm.

Graciela Olio Ceramics: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series), 2010, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, 15x10x12 cm. Photo by Hernán Cédola.

Graciela Olio Ceramics: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series), 2010, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, 15x10x12 cm. Photo by Hernán Cédola.

Graciela Olio: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series), 2011, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, both 15x10x12 cm.

Graciela Olio: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series), 2011, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, 15x15x15 cm.

Red Lodge Clay Center Long Term Residency / Red Lodge, Montana, USA

Red Lodge Clay Center Long Term Ceramics Residency

Red Lodge Clay Center Long Term Residency / Red Lodge, Montana, USA
Application Deadline: February 1st, 2014

The Long-Term Residency (September 1 - July 31) is ideal for committed individuals in transition from post baccalaureate studies to graduate school, as well as those pursuing the development of professional artistic careers. Self-directed ceramic artists searching for the time, space and resources needed to explore new ideas and create new work will enjoy the rural mountainous setting. Accepted residents will be provided with studio space, housing, utilities, and a monthly stipend in exchange for twenty hours of work per week at the Clay Center. Responsibilities will include assisting in the retail operation of the gallery, teaching community clay classes, as well as cleaning and maintenance of the studio and gallery. Residents will be responsible for personal living expenses, as well as all material and firing expenses.
Application Fee: $40

The Red Lodge Clay Center welcomes applications from ceramic artists who will thrive working as a team, in a community minded atmosphere. The ceramics studio is located approximately six miles north of Red Lodge, 463 Two Mile Bridge Road. A form of transportation is necessary for the duration of the residency. Resident artists have 24-hour access to the ceramics studio. For more detailed information on material needs and studio equipment please contact the Red Lodge Clay Center.

Click here to apply online.

CONTACT
residencies@redlodgeclaycenter.com

Red Lodge Clay Center
123 South Broadway
Red Lodge, Montana 59068
United States

> More articles / View the list of articles, reviews and special features

Graciela Olio: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series), 2010, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, 15x15x15 cm. Photo by Hernán Cédola.

Graciela Olio: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series), 2010, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, 15x15x15 cm. Photo by Hernán Cédola.

Graciela Olio: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series, 2010, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, 10x10x12 cm. Photo by Hernán Cédola.

Graciela Olio: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series, 2010, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, 10x10x12 cm. Photo by Hernán Cédola.

Graciela Olio: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series), 2010, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, 10x10x12 cm. Photo by Hernán Cédola.

Graciela Olio: Proyecto Sur, Serie Home (Project South, Home Series), 2010, Porcelain sheet (Keraflex) print with photoceramic (gum bichromate process), Printing directly on raw sheet before handbuilding, 10x10x12 cm. Photo by Hernán Cédola.