Mircea Cantor – Special Event at Transilvania International Film Festival 2012 / Cluj-Napoca, Romania
June 1-10, 2012

The Romanian artist often compared with Marcel Duchamp and scouted by the world’s distinguished galleries and museums, Mircea Cantor, will star in one of TIFF 2012’s special events.

For the first time, a few of his video works will be screened in Romania, outside the space they were initially conceived for – the gallery. The artist will attend the screening, giving the audience in Cluj a chance to meet him and take part in discussions.

„Mircea Cantor is on the gallery of Romanian artists who are far more known and valued abroad than in their home country. (…) The screening of his video short films in a cinema is a special program at TIFF by which we try to fix this abnormality”, says the artistic director of the festival, Mihai Chirilov.

The audience will be able to view at Cluj eight of his video works, already included in the prestigious galleries and museums of the world as part of other exhibitions: 9+1=10? (2003-2005), Dead Time (2003), Departure (2005), Double Heads Matches (2002-2003), Nulle part ailleurs (2000), Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012), The Snow and the Man (2005), Tracking Happiness (2009).

Mircea Cantor creates images that are at once crystalline in their clarity, yet deeply paradoxical. They are concerned with issues of memory, history, oppression, and the futility—and necessity—of hope. While his thematic concerns may reflect his identity as a Romanian-born artist, his work is also accessible and universal. As he has said, refusing to be pigeonholed by identification with one nation, “art is my country.”

Mircea Cantor was born in 1977 in Oradea and, at the moment, lives in Paris. After moving to France in 2000, four years later Cantor won the most important award granted to young French artists – the Paul Ricard Award, one of his works being purchased by the Museum of Modern Art in Paris. In 2011, the Romanian artist received the prestigious Marcel Duchamp Award and this year he will host his own exhibition at Pompidou Centre in Paris.

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The performance of Highly Strung featuring the giant 14 meter puppet took place on the night of October 28th 2011 during the Nati Frinj festival. The puppet took ten people to operate and had animation (largely created by the children at the local primary school) projected onto it from projectors mounted both on the ground and in the head of the puppet itself. Music by Stephen Oakes.

Filmed by, Jacqui Schulz, Dave Jones, Gareth Llewellin and Cindi Drennan.

More making of / behind the scenes stuff at theartofdave.blogspot.com.au/

With so many other forms of entertainment the puppet shows of today may seem like an already dead medium. However, you’d be wrong in thinking this, since Australian filmmaker Dave Jones shows us that there is still a fair amount of life in the ancient form of storytelling with his highly ambitious piece, “Highly Strung.”

Performed on the back of grain silos, “Highly Strung” features an enormous 45-foot tall puppet that took 10 people to operate. The giant work of art was bolstered by projected animation done largely by local school children, giving the production an eerie Tim Burton vibe. This particular performance took place at the Nati Frinj festival in Natimuk, Australia.

Jones said of the animation, “For the mouth we actually mounted a projector inside the puppets head and gaffer taped it to an iPod which we could control wirelessly from the ground 20 meters below.” Though it is just a five minute edit of the whole performance, the clip is captivating, immersing the viewer in a bizarre, but ultimately innocent world of dreams and wonderment. (via the Huffington Post)

Sharjah Art Foundation Open Call: Production Programme 2012

Sharjah Art Foundation Open Call: Production Programme 2012

Sharjah Art Foundation Open Call: Production Programme 2012

Sharjah Art Foundation announces the 2012 Production Programme Open Call for grants to artists working in a range of media. Up to $200,000 is available in this application cycle. Deadline: 24 February 2012.

The Sharjah Art Foundation (SAF) Production Programme broadens the possibilities for the production of art in the MENASA region through a commitment to support innovation and excellence in artistic practice by encouraging risk and experimentation. This commitment places artists at the core of the Foundation’s mission by offering grants and professional support for the realization of projects selected from an open call for proposals.

The past decade has seen an extraordinary rise in artistic activity throughout the Middle East, resulting in an increased visibility for artists both regionally and internationally. Within this context, the Foundation hopes to promote and encourage an environment of public and private patronage for the highest level of artistic endeavour. This programme focuses on supporting artists in their individual attempts to create work on a scale they have perhaps never imagined possible.

Arts practitioners are invited to propose imaginative, ambitious and inspirational projects that will transform our understanding of what art is and how it can be experienced. With this initiative we hope to engage and challenge the artists, our audiences and ourselves aesthetically, intellectually, emotionally, socially, politically or in ways new and unexpected.

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On the eve of a major retrospective at Tate Modern, Gerhard Richter talks about his life and work with Nicholas Serota, Director of Tate. / 11.10.2011

Gerhard Richter: Panorama, Tate Modern
6 October 2011  – 8 January 2012

Spanning nearly five decades, and coinciding with the artist’s 80th birthday, Gerhard Richter: Panorama is a major retrospective exhibition that groups together significant moments of his remarkable career.

Since the 1960s, Gerhard Richter has immersed himself in a rich and varied exploration of painting. Gerhard Richter: Panorama highlights the full extent of the artist’s work, which has encompassed a diverse range of techniques and ideas. It includes realist paintings based on photographs, colourful gestural abstractions such as the squeegee paintings, portraits, subtle landscapes and history paintings.

(Source: vasihirdo)

Midnight City by M83

Directed by Fleur & Manu (Division/Les Télécréateurs)

Midnight City is the first single of the new M83 album, Hurry up, We’re Dreaming.

We are here for our children - Survival International
On every continent, from the green depths of the Amazon basin to the icy  reaches of the Arctic tundra, children raised in tribal communities are  taught the skills and values that have ensured the survival of their  peoples for generations.
In Malaysia, Penan children help to build homes from tree saplings and giant palm leaves; beneath the blue-green surface of the the Andaman Sea, Moken children learn to catch dugong, crab and sea-cucumber with long harpoons; in Mongolia, Tsaatan children are taught the ancient herding skills of their parents by corralling reindeer on the grasslands.Tribal children are the inheritors of their territories, languages and unique ways of seeing the world; human repositories of their ancestors’ knowledge. As they are typically brought up in communities where the solidarity of the group is crucial to survival, children are taught that life is about ‘we’, not ‘I’, and balance with nature, not destruction.Over recent decades, however, many tribal children have witnessed – and experienced – dispossession, disease and despair due to land theft, forced assimilation into mainstream societies and ‘development’ schemes. If their homelands continue to be threatened by destructive external forces; if their values and ways of life are not granted greater respect, the the future of tribal children will be as precarious as their childhoods have often been traumatic.




We are not here for ourselves, said Roy Sesana, a Gana Bushman from Botswana. We are here for our children, and the children of our grandchildren.
I want them to be able to see the stars, but not through industrial smoke, he said. I want them to drink the stream-water without falling ill, and wake to the call of the piha bird, instead of miners’ motor pumps.

Picture © Livia Monami/Survival

We are here for our children - Survival International

On every continent, from the green depths of the Amazon basin to the icy reaches of the Arctic tundra, children raised in tribal communities are taught the skills and values that have ensured the survival of their peoples for generations.

In Malaysia, Penan children help to build homes from tree saplings and giant palm leaves; beneath the blue-green surface of the the Andaman Sea, Moken children learn to catch dugong, crab and sea-cucumber with long harpoons; in Mongolia, Tsaatan children are taught the ancient herding skills of their parents by corralling reindeer on the grasslands.

Tribal children are the inheritors of their territories, languages and unique ways of seeing the world; human repositories of their ancestors’ knowledge. As they are typically brought up in communities where the solidarity of the group is crucial to survival, children are taught that life is about ‘we’, not ‘I’, and balance with nature, not destruction.

Over recent decades, however, many tribal children have witnessed – and experienced – dispossession, disease and despair due to land theft, forced assimilation into mainstream societies and ‘development’ schemes. If their homelands continue to be threatened by destructive external forces; if their values and ways of life are not granted greater respect, the the future of tribal children will be as precarious as their childhoods have often been traumatic.

We are not here for ourselves, said Roy Sesana, a Gana Bushman from Botswana. We are here for our children, and the children of our grandchildren.

I want them to be able to see the stars, but not through industrial smoke, he said. I want them to drink the stream-water without falling ill, and wake to the call of the piha bird, instead of miners’ motor pumps.

Picture © Livia Monami/Survival

Barry Flanagan was one of the most radical sculptors of his generation. Though best known for his statues of bronze hares, his earlier work, in materials as varied as cloth, plaster, and sand, show how he challenged the very idea of what sculpture could be. Fellow artist Peter Randall-Page shares his memories of his close friend. Download this video.

Barry Flanagan: Early Works 1965-1982, Tate Britain

Barry Flanagan: Early Works 1965-1982, Tate Britain
27 September 2011 - 2 January 2012

Barry Flanagan was one of Britain’s most original and inventive artists and a key figure in the development of British and international sculpture. He is best known for the large-scale bronze hare sculptures that he began producing in the early 1980s and that can be seen in many galleries and public spaces around the world. The success of these pieces has tended to obscure the equally important and very different work that characterised his early period. Made from materials as varied as cloth, plaster, sand, hessian and rope, these works highlight a concern with material properties and processes - a concern that is at the heart of his practice.

A contemporary of Gilbert & George, Flanagan studied sculpture at St Martin’s School of Art from 1964 to 1966. The exhibition takes this period as a starting point and reveals the impact of this early work on his later development towards casting in bronze, which he began in 1979. This is the first major retrospective of Flanagan’s work in London since 1983, and by focusing on his early works, shows how this radical and imaginative artist challenged the very nature of sculpture in his time.

Adele - Rolling In The Deep (Jamie xx Shuffle)

UN declares famine in Somalia

UN declares famine in Somalia - Drought Crisis in the Horn of Africa

UN declares famine in Somalia, guardian.co.uk

The UN has officially declared two parts of Somalia to be in famine amid the worst drought in east Africa for 60 years.

Mark Bowden, humanitarian co-ordinator for Somalia, said on Wednesday that famine conditions now existed in the Bakool and Lower Shabelle regions of the country.

He warned: “If we don’t act now, famine will spread to all eight regions of southern Somalia within two months, due to poor harvests and infectious disease outbreaks.

"We still do not have all the resources for food, clean water, shelter and health services to save the lives of hundreds of thousands of Somalis in desperate need."

He added that the lack of resources is alarming. “Every day of delay in assistance is literally a matter of life or death for children and their families in the famine-affected areas.”

UN humanitarian agencies have welcomed the recent statement by al-Shabaab, Islamist insurgents affiliated to al-Qaida, requesting aid in southern Somalia, but said the inability of food agencies to work in the region since early 2010 has prevented the UN from reaching the very hungry – especially children – and has contributed to the current crisis. The Bakool and Lower Shabelle regions are understood to be controlled by al-Shabaab. The UN refugee agency, the UNHCR, said it was seeking further security guarantees from the rebel group that it can deliver greater amounts of assistance in the area to prevent more hungry people from becoming refugees.

The drought in east Africa has left an estimated 11 million people at risk, but Somalia has been the worst hit country as it is already wracked by decades of conflict. The most affected areas of Somalia are in the south, particularly the region of Lower Shabelle, Middle and Lower Juba, Bay, Bakool, Benadir, Gedo and Hiraan, where the UN says an estimated 310,000 now suffer from acute malnutrition.

The Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit (FSNAU) said the crisis represented the most serious food insecurity situation in the world today, in terms of scale and severity.

"Current humanitarian response is inadequate to meet emergency needs," it said. "Assuming current levels of response, evidence suggests that famine across all regions of the south will occur in the coming one to two months. A massive multisectoral response is critical to prevent additional deaths and total livelihood/social collapse and, most immediately, interventions to improve food access and to address health/nutrition issues are needed."

Andrew Mitchell, the UK’s international development secretary, said: “In Somalia, men, women and children are dying of starvation. The fact that a famine has been declared shows just how grave the situation has become.

"It is time for the world to help but sadly the response from many countries has been derisory and dangerously inadequate. Britain is playing its part, with help for more than 2 million people across the Horn of Africa. Now others must do the same."



A famine is measured by rates of hunger, malnutrition and deaths, but the key to it is that it must be widespread.

Technically, a famine is a mortality rate of more than two people per 10,000 per day; acute malnutrition reaching more than 30%; water consumption becoming less than four litres a day; and intake of kilocalories of 1,500 a day compared with the recommended 2,100 a day.

Hundreds of thousands of people have fled Somalia due to the drought and conflict, and refugees are dying of causes related to malnutrition either during the journey or very shortly after arrival at aid camps. On Sunday, the UNHCR began emergency airlift flights in Nairobi to help hundreds of thousands of Somalis who have taken refuge in neighbouring countries.

A giant cargo jet chartered by UNHCR landed in Nairobi with 100 tonnes of tents for the Dadaab refugee camp complex near the Kenya-Somalia border.

The UN says nearly half of the population in Somalia is facing a humanitarian crisis and in urgent need of aid. The number of people in crisis has increased by more than 1 million in the last six months. More than 166,000 Somalis have fled the country since the start of the year, with more than 100,000 of those leaving since May.

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Green Days Workshop Cluj-Napoca, Fabrica de Pensule

Green Days Workshop Cluj-Napoca Fabrica de Pensule/ The Paintbrush Factory 2011

Green Days Workshop Cluj-Napoca (Fabrica de Pensule/ The Paintbrush Factory), July 19th-21st 2011

Fabrica de Pensule invites you to the Green Days workshop in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, an urban exploration in various spaces of the city. The workshop will include bike tours in the city, parks, green spaces, meetings and discussions with artists, arhitects, urbanists, sociologists, with guests from Italy, Belgium and England.

Green Days is an international multidisciplinary project that proposes a reflection on the relations between urban environment and nature and offers the context of larger dabates on the way we can learn from nature and apply nature-inspired models, schemes and concepts in art, urban space and science.

The Green Days workshop will be organized as an urban exploration in different areas of the city – parks (Parcul Feroviarilor, the Central Park), markets (Abator Market, Mihai Viteazu Market), the river banks, Mărăști and Mănăștur neighbourhoods, green spaces like the Botanical Garden, Hoia Forest. The workshop is a process of exploring not only the urban geography, but also an attempt to map different themes connected to urban ecology, green activism and the role that green spaces play in the urban and social tissue. At the end of the urban exploration, there will be a film projection session at Fabrica de Pensule, on the theme of biomimicry, as well as the Future Forecast
workshop, conducted by István Szakáts.

Participation at the workshop is open to anybody who will subscribe by sending an email at corina@fabricadepensule.ro (please mention your name and the part of the workshop that you would like to participate at). The tours in the city will be on bikes; there is a possibility to use the bikes offered for free by the Green Revolution Association, through the national bike-sharing program I’Velo (please mention in the email if you would like to use a bike).

The detailed programme is available on: greendaysproject.tumblr.co​m
Contact: corina@fabricadepensule.ro​, 004 0725 530 105

Green Days Workshop Cluj event on Facebook.

Organizer: Fabrica de Pensule (www.fabricadepensule.ro)
Partners: neoncampobase (IT), AAA - Audiovisual Artists Anonymous (BE), Radar (UK)
Financed by: European Cultural Foundation (www.eurocult.org)
Supported by: Green Revolution Association (www.greenrevolution.ro)

 

‘I will not lose my culture. I will never leave my culture. Even if I am given clothes, I will still be a Mursi.’

This picture is available as a greetings card, with all profits going to Survival’s campaigns.Picture © Joey L
Pictures from Ethiopia’s Omo Valley by award-winning photographer Joey L. A massive hydro-electric dam, Gibe III,  is under construction on the Omo. When completed it will destroy a  fragile environment and the livelihoods of the tribes, which are closely  linked to the river and its annual flood.

‘I will not lose my culture. I will never leave my culture. Even if I am given clothes, I will still be a Mursi.’

This picture is available as a greetings card, with all profits going to Survival’s campaigns.
Picture © Joey L

Pictures from Ethiopia’s Omo Valley by award-winning photographer Joey L. A massive hydro-electric dam, Gibe III, is under construction on the Omo. When completed it will destroy a fragile environment and the livelihoods of the tribes, which are closely linked to the river and its annual flood.