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April 2011

Rery (likes) - EXTRA!, April 2011

EXTRA!, April 2011: Rery (likes)

Interview by Vasi Hîrdo

What is your name and who are you in real life?

Rery (likes): I am Rery. I was born in Taipei, grew up in Montreal and am now living and working in Paris as a freelance illustrator.

In what techniques do you usually work, do you make sketches first?

I use my pen tablet to make illustrations on Illustrator, but have always a sketches book with me so that I can draw down the unexpected ideas. I like the nearly perfect control and the multiple possibilities of the digital art, as much as the spontaneity and the freedom of the hand drawing.

La pénultième (2010) / Digital collage with Jay Maude’s photograph

What is your present project and what’s its history? Do you plan to make an exhibition?

Currently, I’m working with a friend on a website: ARTchipel.com. It’s a collaboration project that wishes to promote artists coming from around the world.

I’ve only exhibited my works few times in the past. I am preparing to do more in the future, psychologically and in terms of works.

How it all started? Do you remember your first works?

I make Hans Hartung’s words mine: “Everything we feel deeply must be expressed.” I am a very visual person and have always felt the need to express my emotion and state of mind through images.

My early drawings were heavily influenced by manga. With time and various encounters, the evolution comes subtly but naturally. Today, my works are very different from the ones before, but they keep the simple lines and expressiveness of my first drawings.

☼.☼ (2011)

Tell us more about your art blog (rerylikes) and what plans you have for it.

I started my art blog to share things I like with my living-far-away-twin-sister. With time, this (almost) daily practice builds up a digital memory gathering things that move me and help me in my personal research.

It is a beautiful surprise that so many people share the same love for art with me. And thanks to this blog, I’ve met virtually many great artists and curators. I will certainly continue to nurture this love and sharing, hopefully with more and more people.

La lectrice (2011)

Visit the artist’s website and her art blog.

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  • Interview with Carole Epp - Artist of the month, April 2011

    Interview with ceramic artist Carole Epp - Artist of the month, April 2011

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    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : In what techniques do you usually work and what materials do you use?

    Carole Epp: Since I create more than one line of work, I’m afraid this will be a long answer! I have for a long time maintained both a sculptural and a functional line of ceramic objects.

    My sculptural work incorporates hand built and slip cast components; found objects, and constructed objects of various materials (most often wood). Through hand building and slip-casting the clay form is developed. I then use underglazes, engobes and China Paints to decorate the work.

    My functional line of objects varies in terms of techniques all the time. I will sometimes throw porcelain, or hand build dark mid temperature clays, or slipcast forms. This is a process for me in which I aim to simply have fun, explore technique, and ideally constantly evolve. I love throwing with porcelain (Southern Ice in particular).  My aesthetic leans towards more crisp bright white objects with a bit of color added through glaze or underglazes. Lately I’ve been developing a body of work that is inspired by my young son. I’ve been stamping and drawing (scraffito) a lot of cute imagery on my work. Surprisingly this work has been incredibly rewarding in that it simply brings joy and smiles to me as I make it, and to those that use it.


    She felt like a joke and was falling a part at the seams, 2011, Mid-fired white stoneware, underglaze, china paint - View her works

    What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces?

    My present project is a series of figurative sculptures that reference kitsch figurines, lowbrow art, DIY culture, and popular/ western/ consumer culture. Drawing from very personal narratives the work is an investigation into the human condition presenting figurative tableaus of death and love, hope and failure, family and social pressures. The aim of my work is always to stimulate conversation, thought and action in a pro-active method. I desire to address issues of political, social, humanitarian concern. Issues are taken from contemporary media, but addressed through my own personal voice.

    I have been working on this type of work for over six years now. There is always new subject matter to develop, more dialogues to be presented and discussed, new imagery that floats into my mind. As life changes, this body of work changes for me.

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  • Interview with Cynthia Lahti - Recognized artist, April 2011

    Interview with ceramic artist Cynthia Lahti - Spotlight- Recognized artist, April 2011

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    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces?

    Cynthia Lahti: I am working on several ideas right now: people wearing disguises, busts of elegant women, and male/ female couples. These are all subjects that have always interested me but that I have never fully explored.

    I am also continuing to use some of the broken piece from my discarded sculptures that I have saved. This idea started in 2010 with he creation of the sculpture Vault Alarm that was composed of broken sculptures. In my current exploration of this idea, I am experimenting with combining the broken pieces together to form a new figure. This idea came from realizing that when I destroying unsuccessful sculptures, body pieces that remained were often extremely interesting to me and I could not discard them. I am finally inspired to see how they look combined together and I have been very excited by the results.


    Socks - View her works

    In what technique do you usually work and what materials do you use?

    I am focusing on hand-built ceramic sculptures of human and animal figure(s). I like to use a wide variety of clay bodies, my favorite being porcelain.  I have used all types of firing techniques to achieve the final surface treatment on the pieces. I am most excited but the results I have been getting from cone 10 soda and salt firings and low fire raku.

    What was the starting point in your investigation?

    I start by finding images of figures that intrigue me in older books and magazine, I then do drawing of the images and finally sculptures, inspired by these drawings, are create out of clay.

    My art is influenced by human artifacts from ancient times to the present, as well as by my personal experiences and emotions. Like the varied objects and images I draw on for inspiration - from 1940s knitting catalogs and outsider art, to Native American cedar carvings and Degas’ sculptures of dancers—my artworks force an explanation of reality and compel viewers to connect to a larger human experience. Currently I am focusing on ceramic sculpture based on expressive images of the figure I find in a variety of source materials.

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  • Interview with Patrick Colhoun - New artist, April 2011

    Interview with ceramic artist Patrick Colhoun - New artist, April 2011

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    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : In what techniques do you usually work and what materials do you use?

    Patrick Colhoun: I am self taught and started throwing on the wheel in the very early days and quickly progressed to handbuilding, to experiment with form and shape. Sometimes I combine the two and start from a thrown vessel and handbuild onto it. I work mostly in black clay. I like the way I can handbuild with it and the darkness of the body suits the finished work in terms of texture and the overall mood of the piece I am trying to convey. The subject of my work can be quite dark and masculine and so this process suits what I am trying to achieve. My palette of glazes is very restricted. I rarely use bright colour, mostly dark and metallic finishes.  


    Chain Mail - View his works

    What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces?

    My current work is centered around the development of a series of partial heads, which are usually looking downwards in a brooding, contemplative way. I have introduced various piercings to the heads. Because people do not expect to see these, they add an element of shock and intrigue to the piece. These pieces are in some ways a series of self portraits both in physical terms but also in terms of the mood they convey, I started making these after the death of a close family member and it meant the making of these pieces became a very therapeutic process. The pieces are handbuilt by coiling and are refined as they dry. 

    Do you remember the starting point, your early works?

    I have only been exhibiting my work for two years and making for slightly more than that. I am completely self taught with no ceramic or art training and a career beforehand. Only when I was made redundant from my job did I start to think about exhibiting my work and the first two years of my career have seen my work be influenced by a number of things that I never expected. My early work was influenced by redundancy and to a degree growing up in Belfast during the Troubles. After that, I liked the reaction I got to slightly darker subject matter and deliberately developed a style that was strong, masculine and slightly controversial. I began to look into other slightly dark influences such as containment, aggression and sexual deviancy. I think that this was my way of expressing the fact that I had worked for other people for nearly twenty years and this was me rebelling slightly, through my ever more controversial subject matter.

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  • Interview with John Shirley - Ceramic Technique, April 2011

    Interview with South African ceramic artist John Shirley - Ceramic Technique - Soluble Salts, April 2011

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    Ceramics Now Magazine
    : In what technique do you usually work and what materials do you use?

    John Shirley: I currently work in a bone china body which I produce from locally available materials. I have always been drawn to translucent bodies and the one I am currently making is more translucent than any I have used previously. Being bone china it is also whiter then any body I have previously used as the bone ash in the body acts as a bleach on any traces of iron in the body. The work is cast in moulds which I make using Paperplaster. This method uses less plaster than conventional mould making methods and results in much lighter moulds which are far easier to handle. The pieces are bisque fired to 1080oC and then sanded to achieve an extremely smooth surface which I decorate with wax resist and solutions of various soluble salts before the final firing to 1250oC in an electric kiln.

    Ceramics Now Magazine: What is the starting point in your investigation (research) with soluble salts?

    I have always been intrigued with soluble salts ever since first seeing the work of Arne Åse. A local ceramic supplier had some cobalt chloride that had been on the shelves for some time and presented it to me. So began the tests with solubles and I am hooked to this day. I have tested a number of the salts in different solutions and in different layers. For some effects I fire between layers to achieve specific effects. Some of the salts are not available locally, and I work mainly with different strengths of Cobalt, Ferric and Nickel Chloride and Potassium Dichromate solutions.

    Salts of Cobalt and chrome on bone china - View his works

    What did you learn from working with different materials?

    I am fascinated by the chemical aspect of the ceramic process, and much of my work has been informed by this. I have previously worked extensively with crystalline glazes and creating reduction effects in electric firings. I think technical challenges are what keep me going and there is always something to investigate. I find that for me it is essential to focus on one thing at a time and at present I am occupied with the effects of layering the salt solutions.

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