Baldwin / Guggisberg, Beyond Glass and 20th Century Venetian Glass - Exhibitions at Ariana Museum, Geneva

Baldwin / Guggisberg, Beyond Glass exhibition - Musee Ariana, Geneva

Baldwin / Guggisberg, Beyond Glass Exhibition - Ariana Museum, Geneva
13 October 2011 - 25 March 2012

The internationally-renowned master glassmakers, Philip Baldwin and Monica Guggisberg have the techniques of glass to develop a fascinating aesthetic of forms and colors sublimated by a mastered articulation of light. The Musee Ariana is devoting a major exhibition to this artistic duo that explires their recent as well as earlier work in order to acknowledge a highly personal poetic universe combining two visions of an inner world.

20th Century Venetian Glass - a private Genevan collection
13 October 2011 - 8 April 2012

This Genevan collection brings together an ensemble of vases, bowls and dishes from the 1920s to the 1990s that illustrated the diversity and the quality of the Venetian glassmaking industry in the 20th century. The majority of the models presented were produces in their hundreds by the Murano glassblowers for companies such as Venini, Cappelin, Barovier, Martinuzzi, Seguso and Barbini. This multiplicity should not disguise the fact that all these pieces are unique.

And a gift from the Friends of the Musée Ariana:
an 18th century Nymphenburg porcelain rocaille pot-pouri vase

Musée Ariana - Musée suisse de la céramique et du verre
Avenue de la Paix 10
CH-1202 Geneva, Switzerland
Tel. +41(0)22 418 54 50
Fax. +41(0)22 418 54 51

ariana@ville-ge.ch
www.ville-ge.ch/ariana

DisGRAZIE by Bertozzi & Casoni, FaMa Gallery, Verona

DisGRAZIE exhibition by Bertozzi & Casoni, FaMa Gallery

DisGRAZIE by Bertozzi & Casoni, FaMa Gallery, Verona
1 October - 12 November 2011

Opening: Friday 30 September, hours 18.00-21.00

On 30th September 2011, from 6pm, FaMa Gallery in Verona holds the opening of the exhibition DisGRAZIE (DisGrace), an original exhibition project by Bertozzi & Casoni, who for the very first time will present a collection of new works investigating the relationship between art and nature and the expressive potential of matter in its multiple plastic and aesthetic meanings.
Through an experimental and conceptual reading of ceramic, a practice which has marked the research of the artists since 1980, the exhibition has two main sections:
The first consists of sods of earth containing different kinds of sedimentation, including waste and human and animal remains. These groups – where what we usually desire to remove has been buried -, are the humus prolifero from which sprout amazingly beautiful floral microcosms. The second section includes compressions of discarded waste recovered from the “rubbish dump” of the contemporary consumer society (tins, cans and scrap metal); from these heaps of waste emerge succulent plants, waterproof and robust enough to survive attack from the waste and to give it new vigour.

For the DisGrazie project at the FaMa Gallery, Bertozzi & Casoni “forge” an evocative and surreal setting in order to reveal the contradictions and chaos of postmodern life, addressing the recurring theme of vanitas with a unique, exuberant exhibition. All with the help of ceramic, a material that is fragile yet everlasting, which the artists manipulate in hybrid and polymorphous expressive ways with the strong desire to promote osmosis between art and life and to immortalise the transience of existence.

Notes on the artists:
Bertozzi & Casoni is a general partnership founded in 1980 in Imola. For thirty years artists have devoted themselves exclusively to ceramic as a possibility for painted sculpture, but in the second half of the 1990s a more conceptual aspect emerged in their work which would stimulate, towards the year 2000, a great turning point: Bertozzi & Casoni abandon the use of majolica to favour the use of ceramic materials of industrial origin. In 2004 they are invited to exhibit at the Tate in Liverpool (A Secret History of Clay) and in 2005 at the XIV Quadriennale in Rome. In 2007 they exhibit at Cà Pesaro, International Gallery of Modern Art in Venice, in 2008 at the Sforza Castle in Milan, in 2009 at the Italian Pavilion of the Venice Biennale, in 2010 at AVA All Visual Arts in London (Vanitas. The transience of Earthly Pleasures), at the Sperone Westwater Gallery in New York (Interval), at the Sperone Gallery in Sent and at the Arnaldo Pomodoro Foundation in Milan (Italian sculpture in the 21st century). In 2011 they exhibit at the Musée des Beaux Arts in Ajaccio (Réflection sur la mort) and are once again invited to the Italian Pavilion of the Venice Biennale.

FaMa Gallery
Corso Cavour 25/27, 37121 Verona
Tel. +39 045 8030985
Fax +39 045 8011410
info@famagallery.com
www.famagallery.com

John Martin: APOCALYPSE exhibition, Opening 21 September at Tate Britain

John Martin (1789–1854) was a key figure in the nineteenth-century art world, renowned for his dramatic scenes of apocalyptic destruction and biblical disaster. While he was hugely popular, he remained something of an outsider, scorned by the art critics of his time.

Organised in partnership with the Laing, Newcastle, this major exhibition will be the first show dedicated to his paintings for over 30 years, and the largest display of his works seen in public since his death. Bringing together his most famous paintings from collections around the world, as well as previously unseen and newly-restored works, the exhibition will reassess this singular figure in art history, and reflect on the enduring influence of his apocalyptic art on painting, cinema and popular spectacle. The show will also examine how Martin’s populism fits into the story of British art, and how his work connects with the culture of today.

Pre-book John Martin tickets at Tate Britain here.

I’m Martin Myrone, the curator of the exhibition at Tate Britain, and I’ve been working on the show with the team here at Tate and our exhibition partners at the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle and the Millennium Galleries, Sheffield for the last 2½ years on planning, researching, selecting and organising this exhibition. You may have seen the great version of the show which appeared at Newcastle and Sheffield earlier this year. The Tate show is even larger, with a total of over 120 works – major paintings, sketches and watercolours, and his mezzotints and engineering plans. This will be the biggest collection of his works ever seen, and a chance to reassess this fascinating and exciting nineteenth-century artist.

NURSE - A show of drawings and sculptures by Cynthia Lahti, PDX Contemporary Art

NURSE - A show of drawings and sculptures by Cynthia Lahti, PDX Contemporary Art

August 30, 2011 - October 1, 2011

“My goal is to create works of art that resonate with honesty and reflect the beauty and chaos of the world. My art is influenced by human artifacts from ancient times to the present, as well as by my personal experiences and emotions. Like the varied objects I draw on for inspiration—from 1940s knitting catalogs and outsider art, to Native American cedar carvings and Degas’ sculptures of dancers—my artworks force an explanation of reality and compel viewers to connect to a larger human experience. I work in various media, including drawing, collage, and sculpture.

Currently I am focusing on ceramic sculpture based on expressive images of the figure I find in a variety of source materials. There are so many figures out there in the world, wearing so many poses and costumes; I find those that resonate and interpret them in clay. Each sculpture expresses an intense inner psychological state, its surface effecting a fluctuating quality, part beautiful, part grotesque.” Cynthia Lahti

Read the interview with Cynthia Lahti, Recognized artist - April 2011

Cynthia Lahti’s profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

PDX Contemporary Art

Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 11 AM - 6 PM
Address: 925 NW Flanders, Portland, Oregon 97209
Tel.: 503.222.0063
Email: info@pdxcontemporaryart.com

Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition feature

This month we’re making a special feature for the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition, which is on view June 11 through September 18, 2011 at the Denver Art Museum.

It’s the first feature made by Ceramics Now Magazine, and includes images from the Overthrown exhibition and interviews with 10 of the exhibiting artists, plus with the curator of the exhibition. At the end of July, we will also send a special newsletter. Subscribe here to our monthly newsletter.

NAVIGATION (HOW TO):

About Overthrown - About the Overthrown feature on Ceramics Now Magazine
/Overthrown - Images from the exhibition (in High Quality).
/Overthrown_Interviews - Interviews with 10 of the exhibiting artists.
/nameofthe_artist (ex: /Linda_Sormin) - Images with the works of the artist you’re looking for.

Interviews (many will be published at the end of July):

Gwen F. Chanzit - The curator of the exhibition.

Overthrown: John Roloff, The Sea Within the Land/Laramide, Landscape Projection, Seascape Structure 31

Overthrown: John Roloff, The Sea Within the Land/Laramide, Landscape Projection, Seascape Structure 31

Overthrown: Jeanne Quinn, You Are The Palace, You Are The Forest, 2011. Porcelain, glaze, lustre, wire, electrical hardware, and paint. Photo by Jeff Wells

Overthrown: Jeanne Quinn, You Are The Palace, You Are The Forest, 2011. Porcelain, glaze, lustre, wire, electrical hardware, and paint. Photo by Jeff Wells

Overthrown: Works by Del Harrow
- Wedgewood Black Hive/Hole, 2011. Slip-cast black porcelain.- Links, 2011. Earthenware, glaze, and platinum luster.- Copper Fade, 2011. Earthenware and glaze.(photo by Jeff Wells)

Overthrown: Works by Del Harrow

- Wedgewood Black Hive/Hole, 2011. Slip-cast black porcelain.
- Links, 2011. Earthenware, glaze, and platinum luster.
- Copper Fade, 2011. Earthenware and glaze.
(photo by Jeff Wells)

Interview with Gwen F. Chanzit - Special feature for The Denver Art Museum, July 2011

Interview with Gwen F. Chanzit, the curator of Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition at The Denver Art Museum, July 2011

This is the first interview we’ve made for the special Overthrown feature. The special feature for The Denver Art Museum covers more interviews with artists exhibiting at the Overthrown: Clay Without Limits, which is on view June 11 through September 18, 2011. Subscribe here to receive the special edition of our newsletter.

Ceramics Now Magazine: How did you find the artists for Overthrown: Clay Without Limits exhibition? Was it hard or you already had their names in mind?

Gwen F. Chanzit: I spent many months researching, talking with artists in the field, and visiting artists in their studios.  I also participated in symposia at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where I was introduced to the work of additional artists.

From well over 100 file folders with research on the work of individual artists, I narrowed my selections by reviewing these regularly, moving the folders into piles that grew into “yes,”  “maybe,” and “no.”  I was particularly interested in showing the breadth of work that ceramic artists are accomplishing today.  Sometimes when I made a studio visit to see one artist, I discovered another artist or two.


Ceramics Now Magazine: What are the criteria on which you selected the artists for this exhibition?

Gwen F. Chanzit: I look for quality, inventiveness, and artists who are pushing the limits to develop new methodologies. 

Working in all scales, from architecturally expansive to almost impossibly small, the artists in Overthrown employ twenty-first-century technology hand-in-hand with standard modeling and molding techniques. They use digital cameras, computers, laser cutters, 3-D printers, and computer-controlled mills along with more traditional tools. Some push the forms of functional objects. Others push the limits of fragility. They take risks that draw on material chemistry and maverick kiln techniques. Some of their works include not only clay, but also found objects such as metal, plastic, and abandoned industrial materials. Overthrowing our expectations of ceramic art —its size, its context, its methods, and its meaning—these artists show us new ways of using this versatile and timeless material.

Ceramics Now Magazine: Did the exhibition space offered many obstacles? How did the artists adapt to the space?

Gwen F. Chanzit: The exhibition space is a dynamic Daniel Libeskind design with angular walls and interesting spaces that are wonderful for exhibiting three-dimensional work. The soaring ceilings provide particularly good opportunities for large scale work. Each artist was encouraged to utilize these exciting spaces—which they did.

Most of the works were made especially for this exhibition, and many are in direct dialogue with the site—they move beyond the pedestal to the wall, the floor, and even the ceiling. A few extend across the entire museum complex. They break boundaries that are physical, technological, conceptual, and spatial.

Ceramics Now Magazine: On what principles do you guide on preparing an exhibition like this, with more than 20 artists participating?

Gwen F. Chanzit: It’s important to show each artist’s work with integrity, to enable the work to have enough space to show itself well.  It was a particular goal for each work in this exhibition to be seen independently—-with the added bonus of long vistas across the gallery from work to work.


Ceramics Now Magazine: Do you have any guidelines for the artists? How long ago did you contact and proposed them to exhibit at the Denver Art Museum?

Gwen F. Chanzit: I encouraged each of the 25 artists to be very ambitious—not to be hindered by cost of materials or limitations of space.  Most artists had just over a year to prepare the work—a very short time in the world of these ceramic installations where challenges of materials and techniques had to be resolved.  In some cases, kilns had to be built..

Ceramics Now Magazine:  Significant support was provided by different foundations and citizens. What is DAM’s relationship with foundations and donors?

As most non-profits, the Denver Art Museum appreciates the significant support received by foundations and donors.

Ceramics Now Magazine:  What part or what limits of this exhibition you find yourself connected to?

I am connected to all parts of the exhibition.

Ceramics Now Magazine: What expectations do you have from this exhibition?

Gwen F. Chanzit: I very much hope this exhibition will overthrow some expectations of what ceramics might be.  It is a versatile and timeless material that is being used in new inventive ways in the 21st century.

——————————————————————-

Gwen Chanzit is curator of modern and contemporary art and the Herbert Bayer Collection and Archive, Denver Art Museum. She has organized many DAM exhibitions including Bonnard, Matisse from the Baltimore Museum of Art, Martha Daniels Grotto, Vance Kirkland: The Late Paintings and Color as Field, as well as numerous exhibitions on Herbert Bayer. Her rotation in the modern and contemporary art galleries for Marvelous Mud is Focus: Earth and Fire.

Among her many publications, Chanzit has authored two books on Herbert Bayer; contributed essays to DAM exhibition catalogs, RADAR: Selections from the Collection of Vicki and Kent Logan and The View From Denver; served as editor and authored essays for the 2009 exhibition catalog, Embrace!; and published an essay in the Austrian exhibition catalog, Ahoi, Herbert: Bayer und die moderne (2009). 

For Marvelous Mud, Chanzit is curating Overthrown: Clay Without Limits, an exhibition in the Anschutz Gallery that features new work by 25 contemporary artists—most of whom work very large scale. She is also preparing a catalog and organizing a related symposium in September 2011.

Chanzit is a frequent lecturer locally, nationally and internationally. She often serves as juror for art competitions and exhibitions and has been a guest curator at the Aspen Institute and the University of Denver. Chanzit holds a Ph.D. in art history and contributes to the future generation of museum professionals as director of the graduate program in museum studies at the University of Denver’s School of Art and Art History.

Visit the Modern and Contemporary Art Collection's web page on the Denver Art Museum website.

  

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→ Read more interviews with ceramic artists and search through our featured artists.

Interview by Vasi Hirdo - Editor of Ceramics Now Magazine

Central Saint Martins degree shows 2011 - MA Design: Ceramics, Furniture, Jewellery

Central Saint Martins degree shows 2011 - University of the Arts, London

15 June 2011 - 16 September 2011

This year, the Central Saint Martins degree shows will be the very last degree shows displayed at the iconic Charing Cross Road, Southampton Row and Back Hill sites before moving to King’s Cross.

The MA Design: Ceramics, Furniture, Jewellery will take place at Southampton Row, London, WC1B 4AP from Monday 20th to Thursday 23rd June, 12-8 pm.

Two interesting projects will be displayed at this show: Fire Emotion Transformation (Alexandra Mazur-Knyazeva) and Experiential Spaces (Kim Norton).

Overthrown: Clay Without Limits

Overthrown, Clay Without Limits - The Denver Art Museum

Overthrown: Clay Without Limits brings together regional, national and international artists who push the boundaries of clay to create large-scale installations that respond to the dynamic architecture of the Daniel Libeskind-designed Hamilton Building. The majority of the 25 participating artists will create site-specific artworks.

Read More

Tribute to George Jeanclos - Clay and bronze / Exhibition - Galerie Capazza, Nançay, France

Tribute to George Jeanclos - Clay and bronze

Georges Jeanclos (1933-1997) is one of France’s great twentieth-century sculptors. His œuvre is rooted in the traumatic events of the Second World War. To escape the round-ups that threatened French Jews, his family was forced to hide in the woods ; Jeanclos, barely ten at the time, had several close brushes with death. When the country was liberated, he saw the corpses of former collaborationists strung up from lampposts ; shortly thereafter, he discovered the skeletal bodies of camp survivors. Decades later, Jeanclos would respond to these seminal events : not by locking himself away in his own experience but by opening up to universality and paying attention to all forms of suffering, past and present ; not by representing horror, but by finding within himself the strength to create beauty.

Jeanclos’ choice medium was clay. He transformed it into thin sheets with which he then shaped human figures. Simultaneously children and adults, men and women, their faces are almost identical. Some are dormeurs resting beneath a coverlet of clay ; others are hidden within urns bearing Hebrew letters drawn from the Kaddish; others are boat travellers bound for the Beyond; still others are kamakuras, meditating bonzes lost in contemplation of the soul’s gardens. To all these, Jeanclos would later add Pietas, amorous Adams and Eves, couples tenderly grazing or stroking one another other. His images reveal both the undeniable weakness of human beings and the invincible strengh of love ; by the simple fact of their existence, they help us to live.

The present show consists of some sixty works in clay and bronze, representing all the periods of Jeanclos’ career. (Tzvetan Todorov)

19 March - 26 June 2011
Galerie Capazza / Nançay / France

Exhibition space: Grenier de Villâtre, 18330 Nançay, France
T.: +33.(0)2.48.51.80.22 / contact@capazza-galerie.com / http://www.galerie-capazza.com/

Capazza Gallery, a superbly restored place of historic interest (from the XVIIth century), connected with the castle of Nançay, is located in the heart of the Sologne, about 90 minutes from Paris and close to the Loire Valley. In exceptional surroundings of 2000 m², you can admire the works of 80 artists with international reputation. These artist represent contemporary art in the most important fields of Fine Arts.

Georges Jeanclos' profile - View his works

Metamorphosis exhibition - The final works (part II)

Artists (in order of appearance): Vasi Hirdo , Adrian Pop , Alexandru Bogdan Pop , Tudor Oltean , Vlad Rus (view part I)

Professor: Adela Gocan

Metamorphosis exhibition - The final works (part I)

Artists (in order of appearance): Cora Pojaru , Raluca Has, Claudiu Pop , Oana Stepan, Bianca Balaie (view part II)

Professor: Adela Gocan