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Faenza ceramics

Ceramic Sculpture during the age of Adolfo Wildt - MIC Faenza, Italy

Ceramic Sculpture during the age of Adolfo Wildt - International Museum of Ceramics Faenza, Italy

Ceramic Sculpture during the age of Adolfo Wildt - The International Museum of Ceramics in Faenza, Italy
29th January – 17th June 2012

Opening ceremony: 28th January at 5.30 p.m.
Event concurring the exhibition devoted to Adolfo Wildt at the Musei di San Domenico in Forlì

The exhibition “Adolfo Wildt. L’anima e le forme tra Michelangelo e Klimt” (28th January – 17th June 2012) curated by Paola Mola, Fernando Mazzocca and Antonio Paolucci, with the scientific coordination by Gianfranco Brunelli, at the Musei di san Domenico in Forlì, highlights the extraordinary creativity of one of the greatest master of the modern sculpture. Wildt (1868 – 1931) was a great artist, self-educated and talented who represented a disputed figure inside the national artistic world: he was venerated from persons who understood his geniality and detested from persons who considered his creations opposing the harmony of the shapes and too linked to the Nordic Decadentism.

The International Museum of Ceramics in Faenza, jointly working with the Fondazione Cassa dei Risparmi di Forlì manager of the event, proposes an exhibition “Ceramic Sculpture during the time of Adolfo Wildt” (28th January – 17th June 2012) curated by Claudia Casali, displayed inside the 20th century collection in order to emphasize the artists who had contacts and relations with Wildt, such as the scholars Fausto Melotti and Lucio Fontana, or others who shared the same extraordinary contemporary artistic experience such as Domenico Rambelli, Galileo Chini, Achille Calzi, Francesco Nonni, Domenico Baccarini, Arturo Martini and Duilio Cambellotti. In the same context the exhibition offers examples of apparent opposite artistic personalities represented by the Futurist movement concretized in the ceramic experience in Faenza (1928-29) and Albisola (from 1929 on).

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  • Antonella Cimatti

    Antonella Cimatti's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    “I believe that the greatest undertaking of the artist is that of professional maintenance. As a matter of fact, along with spontaneous creativity, you indissolubly must add an elevated professional competence regarding technique; through reading and observation, the joy of experimentation, of combining, and of moving forward.

    My design is born from a rereading of past artistic production through a filter of formal personal sensibility directed towards the making of a functional or sculptural object. The forms generated are aesthetically accurate and display a strong sense of the real feminine character, of grace, of elegance and of attention to detail.
    Thus, “Crespines”, objects originally of Faentinian tradition that were used in the grand European courts of the 16th and 17th centuries, have been remade in porcelain paper clay for a new collection which began in 2005.
    It was challenging and exciting to create forms derivative of the past, but reconsidered with completely new techniques and philosophies.

    These pieces have been formed using an incredibly thin decorative weft that ultimately creates their supporting structure: it’s an art of addition, not of subtraction, as was commonly done in the original renaissance crespines, where the perforations were created by piercing and cutting out shapes from the existing closed forms. The procedure anticipates the moulding with a freehand syringe on concave or convex refractory supports and requires a high temperature firing. Sometimes the forms are then mounted on hand-blown glass bases, which have been designed and commissioned in Tuscany. The round shape is prevalent in my work, which can often be found in Italian Renaissance architecture.

    They present themselves in this way, like ample goblets in ceramic filigree, a type of interwoven lace of overlapping spirals in precious porcelain “thread”, an effect absolutely unobtainable without the help of paperclay. Objects of light and vulnerability, which live in illumination and shadow, in tactility, in supreme whiteness and imperceptible vibrations.” Antonella Cimatti

    Antonella Cimatti  was born in Faenza in 1956. One of Carlo Zauli’s pupils at the Istituto d’Arte (State School of Ceramics) in Faenza, she went on to obtain a degree with distinction from the Accademia di Belle Arti (Fine Arts Academy) in Bologna. She has been teaching Design at the Istituto d’Arte (State School of Ceramics) in Faenza since 1979.

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  • Antonella Cimatti: Paperclay “Vilnius”

  • Antonella Cimatti: Optical fibers #2

  • Antonella Cimatti: Optical fibers #1

  • Antonella Cimatti: Paperclay porcelain (detail)

  • Antonella Cimatti: Projection installation (detail) #2

  • Antonella Cimatti: Projection installation (detail)

  • Antonella Cimatti: Lampada 1 (optical fiber)

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