Interview with Mark Goudy - New artist, September 2011

Interview with ceramic artist Mark Goudy - New artist, September 2011

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: Your work with ceramics has been active only in the last three years. What did you do before that? Tell us about your first experience with ceramics.

Mark Goudy: Well, my mother was a potter, starting back in the early 70’s, and so when I was a teenager I was exposed to clay through her work. She had a studio in our basement, with a wheel, kiln, glaze mixing area, etc. I tried throwing on the wheel back then, but I didn’t really connect with the craft aesthetic or the making process during that time. I was more interested in playing music and adventuring outdoors than working with mud.

Somehow thirty years went by before getting my hands back in the clay again. I ended up studying engineering and enjoyed a twenty-year career in the computer industry (designing graphics chips for companies such as Pixar, Silicon Graphics, and nVidia). It wasn’t until a little while after my mother passed away that my wife Liza had the idea of paying homage to her creative spirit by taking a raku class at our local adult school. Pull pieces directly out of a red-hot kiln and drop them into burning sawdust? …sign me up! It was fun performance art, but it was the building process that really drew me in. I started hand-building and designing systems to create forms that reflected my own sensibilities. More classes followed, and within a couple years I left the virtual world of computer engineering and was spending a lot of time in the clay studio. It was refreshing to be working with such a physical material and in a process where every piece created embodies its own unique identity.


Three Vessels - clockwise from left: (m70) 7”w x 3”h; (m81) 10.5”w x 4”h; (m71) 8”w x 3.5”h


You usually work with soluble metal salts, that give impressive shapes and patterns. How do you make the pieces?

I may have been influenced by my experience in computer graphics, where you can render all sorts of interesting objects composed from intersecting curved surfaces, but early on I wanted to get away from the radially symmetric forms that come about from working with the wheel. So I learned about slab construction and ended up making a series of special hump molds (by pouring plaster into stretchy fabric suspended through triangular cutouts in plywood) to shape the clay. These molds enabled me to construct forms out of asymmetric parabolic curved surfaces, which had immediate appeal. My basic process is to shape, and then join these surfaces together to make my rounded vessels. The arcs in these pieces are designed to fit the sweep of my hand as I burnish the surface by rubbing with a smooth stone. For now, I enjoy working in a scale that fits easily into the hands, with forms that feel like waterworn stones.

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Interview with Chang Hyun Bang - New Artist, June-July 2011

Interview with South Korean ceramic artist Chang Hyun Bang - New artist, June-July 2011

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Ceramics Now Magazine
: In what techniques do you usually work and what materials do you use?

Chang Hyun Bang: I usually use two different techniques for my artworks. One is slab-building for the architecture, the other is plaster-casting for the swine. I use stoneware for the architecture, firing at cone 04 while porcelain clay for the swine, firing at cone 6.

What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces?

I have been interested in expressing my personal emotion derived from my own trauma through swine’s body language. Most of all, depression, anxiety, desire, obsession from my daily lives, and subtle emotions indescribable through language have been important sources for my inspiration. My recent works ‘Secret Garden’ represent my personal story hidden in the flowers. The universal meanings of flowers were subverted with my personal narrative in my artworks. But viewers are given a clue through the text to decode my secret story with the flowers.


Demosirorooo, 2009, 50 x 32 x 39, 2009, clay, glaze, decal - View his works

Do you remember your early works, how did it all started?

When I look back on my early works, I seem to be interested in expressing my ‘contradictory desire’ and ‘phenomenological things’ such as the absence and presence of a thing. I usually loved using big words that I couldn’t fully understand. But that kind of questions are very helpful to my recent works.

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Interview with Wim Borst - New artist, May 2011

Interview with Dutch ceramic artist Wim Borst - New artist, May 2011

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Ceramics Now Magazine
: In what techniques do you usually work and what materials do you use?

Wim Borst: My ceramic work is built from clay slabs.
The clay which I am using it is a mixture of two stoneware bodies, Molochite and flax-fiber. I have developed this clay while working for European EKWC Work Center in ‘s-Hertogenbosch in 1998.

At gray/black objects a black body stain is added.
The open texture in the clay is obtained by adding organic material during the firing.


Counterpoint Series 11 - View his works

What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces?

Currently I am working on a new series of objects, tube / pipe structures (see photo), which will be exhibit during this year.

Technique:
I begin a series/theme with a few sketches on paper or small designs in clay.
Slabs leather-hard clay and cutted molded parts from a PVC / wood or plaster mold are mixed up together with clay slip.

Special attention is given to the finishing of leather-hard.

Once bisque fired, the object is wet smoothed with diamond pads and dried.

Glazing: parts of the object are sprayed with glaze or sinterengobe, the glaze fire in an electric oven 12600 C.

Where do you get your inspiration for your pieces and what motivates you to do a good job ?

I am inspired by the abstract geometric forms in sculptural art work and architecture.

The inspiration is based on a systematic approach to design and execution of similar artists such as, among others, Ad Dekkers (NL), Jan Schoonhoven (NL), the architects HPBerlage (NL) and JJPOud (NL), including artists belonging to ‘the Style’ (Dutch art movement (1917-1931).

The objects refer to functional forms, such as vases and bowls, but they are never the starting point. The autonomous objects show how triangles, squares, circles and ovals are split and merged.

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Interview with Patrick Colhoun - New artist, April 2011

Interview with ceramic artist Patrick Colhoun - New artist, April 2011

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Ceramics Now Magazine
: In what techniques do you usually work and what materials do you use?

Patrick Colhoun: I am self taught and started throwing on the wheel in the very early days and quickly progressed to handbuilding, to experiment with form and shape. Sometimes I combine the two and start from a thrown vessel and handbuild onto it. I work mostly in black clay. I like the way I can handbuild with it and the darkness of the body suits the finished work in terms of texture and the overall mood of the piece I am trying to convey. The subject of my work can be quite dark and masculine and so this process suits what I am trying to achieve. My palette of glazes is very restricted. I rarely use bright colour, mostly dark and metallic finishes.  


Chain Mail - View his works

What is your present project, what’s its history and how do you make the pieces?

My current work is centered around the development of a series of partial heads, which are usually looking downwards in a brooding, contemplative way. I have introduced various piercings to the heads. Because people do not expect to see these, they add an element of shock and intrigue to the piece. These pieces are in some ways a series of self portraits both in physical terms but also in terms of the mood they convey, I started making these after the death of a close family member and it meant the making of these pieces became a very therapeutic process. The pieces are handbuilt by coiling and are refined as they dry. 

Do you remember the starting point, your early works?

I have only been exhibiting my work for two years and making for slightly more than that. I am completely self taught with no ceramic or art training and a career beforehand. Only when I was made redundant from my job did I start to think about exhibiting my work and the first two years of my career have seen my work be influenced by a number of things that I never expected. My early work was influenced by redundancy and to a degree growing up in Belfast during the Troubles. After that, I liked the reaction I got to slightly darker subject matter and deliberately developed a style that was strong, masculine and slightly controversial. I began to look into other slightly dark influences such as containment, aggression and sexual deviancy. I think that this was my way of expressing the fact that I had worked for other people for nearly twenty years and this was me rebelling slightly, through my ever more controversial subject matter.

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