Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

Constance McBride: The Lonely Girls, 2013

In this series, works depicting physical aging and a gendered issue surrounding dementia are engaged from a female point of view. Questions surrounding social responsibility are visited through an intimate look at a mother’s dilemma. My focus shifted to my mother after a few years of observing and caring for her while she navigated her days living with Alzheimer’s disease. My mother’s countenance emerges in the work through clay figures over a period of time and through multiplicity. By investigating concrete representations and creating situations that the viewer will identify with, I hope to engage the viewer in a deeper way.

  • Gaku Shakunaga: New Pyramids in Black / Yufuku Gallery, Tokyo

    Gaku Shakunaga exhibition at Yufuku Gallery Tokyo

    Gaku Shakunaga: New Pyramids in Black / Yufuku Gallery, Tokyo
    July 10-19, 2014

    Gaku Shakunaga (b. 1978) creates swirling stoneware pyramids drenched in luscious black glaze accentuated with lacquer. One of the younger ceramists of Yufuku, Shakunaga represents the future of Japanese ceramic sculptors, of artists who are not afraid to create non-functional ceramics that are devoid of function, and are challenging conceptual objects that are modes of expression as well as outlets for the artist’s aesthetics. Having graduated with a degree in sculpture from the leading Tokyo University of Arts, the most prestigious of art universities in Japan, Shakunaga’s new works find the artist combining the forms of his previous Sekiso series with his new-found muse in black.

    Each and every Shakunaga work is comprised of individual clay slabs of varying thickness that are flattened using boards and are stacked upon one another in layers. Each slab is torn from a larger slab of clay using his hands, which leaves a rugged texture to his surfaces. His clay is a mixture of local Toyama clay, porcelain clay, and the Mogusa clay used in Shino ware. After an initial bisque-firing, a black glaze is air-brushed onto the surfaces, and the work is fired again in a gas kiln. In the final stages, Shakunaga sandblasts the surfaces of his works, and then polishes the surfaces and then low-fires the work to create a shimmering bronze-like lustre to his surfaces. Shakunaga’s technique is unique, and is the materialization of his fascination with stacking clay pieces together as if composing architecture.

    The upcoming exhibition will display approx. 15 new works in both black and bronze glaze, and will be the artist’s largest body of new work since his previous exhibition in 2012.

    Gallery hours: Tuesday to Saturday, 11 am - 6 pm. Final day closes at 4 pm.

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  • Rose Cabat at 100: A Retrospective Exhibition of Ceramics at Tucson Museum of Art, Arizona
    February 1 - September 14, 2014

    Collection of the artist. Photos by Carissa Castillo and Rachel Shand.

    More exhibition galleries / List of ceramic art exhibitions

  • The best Art Galleries to visit in Sydney

    With its magnificent Harbour backdrop and glorious weather, Sydney is a fabulous city for spending a day (or several) dropping in and out of art galleries. You can choose between major players, like the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Museum of Contemporary Art, where you’ll be treated to masterpieces and significant temporary exhibitions, and independent laneway affairs, where you’ll get the chance to acquaint yourself with specialised collections and local artists. Here’s a hand picked selection of the best places to go.

    The Art Gallery of New South Wales
    Perched on the edge of the domain and just a stone’s throw from the Harbour, the Art Gallery of New South Wales (or AGNSW) is housed in a gorgeous nineteenth century building, featuring expansive rooms and high ceilings. There are some great hotels in Sydney near it. The permanent collection is impressive, including a wide range of Australian works, plus there’s a constantly evolving program of temporary exhibitions, special events and talks. Between November 2014 and March 2015, for example, the gallery will host Australia’s biggest ever Pop Art showcase, displaying works from lenders all over the world. Featured artists will include Andy Warhol, David Hockney, Roy Lichtenstein and many others. The AGNSW is open seven days a week between 10am till 5pm. Entry to the permanent collection is free, but there’s sometimes an admission fee for temporary exhibitions.

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    The Museum of Contemporary Art
    A fifteen-minute walk from the AGNSW will get you to the Museum of Contemporary Art (or MCA), situated right on Circular Quay. You can see the Harbour Bridge and Opera House from the front steps (and from the top floor bar, should all the art-perusing work up a thirst!). The MCA is the only museum in Australia that’s 100 percent committed to contemporary art. Its permanent collections and visiting shows are sourced from both within Australia and all over the planet. It is open every day between 10am and 5pm. Entry is free, though you might have to pay a small fee for special exhibitions.

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    Karlangu Aboriginal Art Centre
    Before Europeans invaded Australia, the Indigenous population had been making art for at least 60,000 years and perhaps much, much longer. So an artsy visit to Sydney wouldn’t be complete without dropping into the Karlangu Aboriginal Art Centre (129 Pitt St, City). Here, you can wander through one of the best Aboriginal art collections to be found anywhere. The Centre also plays a vital role in the distribution and promotion of Indigenous art by supplying it to various galleries, museums and private buyers both domestically and internationally. It’s open daily between 10am and 5pm.

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    White Rabbit
    One of the world’s largest and most important collections of contemporary Chinese art is held at White Rabbit, which you’ll find hidden away in the inner city suburb of Chippendale, at 30 Balfour Street. Established by Kerr and Judith Neilson, the gallery specialises in art created since the turn of the millennium. In excess of 400 artists are profiled and new additions are being made all the time. Plus, there’s a lovely teahouse, which is the perfect place to take a break after you’ve spent hours browsing. White Rabbit is open between 10am and 5pm, Wednesday through to Sunday.

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    Brett Whiteley Studio
    This was the workplace and home of one of Australia’s most famous artists, Brett Whiteley. He passed away in 1992 and, since 1995, the AGNSW has run the space as an art gallery. Complete with unfinished artworks, book collections, paintbrushes and a graffiti wall, it presents an unusual opportunity for an intimate experience of Whiteley’s life. The studio is located at 2 Raper Street, Surry Hills (not far from White Rabbit) and opening hours are 10am-4pm, Friday to Sunday.

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    * This is a guest post.

  • Month in Review: June 2014

    June 2014 at Ceramics Now - Contemporary ceramics magazine

    Hello friends. Welcome to Month in Review, a summary of the last month of activity here at Ceramics Now.
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    Featured artists
    Jamie Bates Slone: Phenotypes, 2014
    Susan Phillips: Untitled, 2013
    Sarah Purvey: Landscape Series, 2010-2014
    Kevork Cholakian: Artist’s Studio Chairs, 2012-2013
    Eszter Imre: Must-produced, 2012
    Tristan Stamm: Collections, 2014
    Lucy Gresley: Vessels, 2014
    Güliz Korkmaz Tirkeş: Flow Series, 2010-2013
    Brett Freund: Bliss Point, 2013-2014
    Michael Boroniec: Spatial Spirals, 2013
    Seth Czaplewski: Onsite Sculpture, 2013-2014

    Article
    The Dance of Infinity, by Hagai Segev

    Exhibition galleries
    Lucia Pizzani: The Worshipper of the Image at Beers Contemporary, London
    Alexandra Lerman: Immediate Release at Tina Kim Gallery, New York
    Michael Geertsen: Still Life, Still Lives at Jason Jacques Gallery, New York

    Exhibitions
    Sakiyama Takayuki and Fukumoto Fuku / Joan B Mirviss, New York
    Matthew Szösz: Complications / Zane Bennett Gallery, Sante Fe
    Watt’s Up? Ceramics and Light / Bernardaud Foundation, Limoges, France
    Simcha Even-Chen: Balance in Motion / Benyamini Contemporary Ceramics Center, Tel Aviv
    Territorios Conmovidos / Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Latinoamericano MACLA, La Plata, Argentina

    Ceramics Now
    Announcing a new guideline for submissions

  • The Dance of Infinity

    Article by Hagai Segev, 2014

    “Up until two years ago, my father, Yaakov, had an agricultural mechanization workshop. Every time I visited the workshop, I found myself entranced by the power of the iron boards and the pile of black and rust colored iron pipes of different diameters, waiting to be used”, Simcha Even-Chen reminisces.

    “When I saw the call for entries for the contest and exhibition at Kapfenberg, Austria, entitled “At the Moment”, I decided to use these memories of my father’s workshop. This was the birth of “A Moment Before…” a work I created in 2009, which has since led to the growth of a whole body of works”.1

    Simcha Even-Chen Contemporary Ceramics

    A moment before…, 2009, Mixtures of stoneware and porcelain, 11.5 x 30 x 24 cm.

    The memories that awakened this body are the evolution of the artistic research Even-Chen had been immersed in during the period of 2006-2009. This group of sculptures, entitled “Illusion”, was exhibited at The Fifth Israeli Ceramics Biennale at The Eretz Israel Museum (2008), among other places, and even received the Gold Coast International Ceramic Art Award. The article that appeared in the biennale catalogue read: “Simcha Even-Chen creates arrays of objects, reminiscent of game pieces. The pieces and geometric shapes simulate complex mathematical relations, based on scientific principles of simplification, alongside an awareness of the complexity of the game”.2

    In her works from the period of 2009-2010, as her research progressed, the cubic shapes and structures gained a softer sculptural presence. They were positioned on solid, dominant foundations, where the first, barely noticeable signs of a light, flowing motion began to appear. In a piece named “Triple Balance” (2010), the massiveness and relatively harsh geometry of the top object is softened somewhat by the gentle presence of the foundation, which seemingly serves as only that, but its connection suggests an integrated statement, alongside a message of contrasts. This piece was featured in important exhibitions in Italy and Korea.3

    In the piece entitled “Motion” (2011), all the elements of movement and flow can for the first time, be seen in the object itself, while the pattern printed on the object surface continues to explore the geometric shape, namely, the grid, which stands out against the background of evenly hued material. This piece was awarded first prize in an exhibition in Slovenia.4

    Simcha Even-Chen Contemporary Ceramic art

    Motion, 2011, Mixtures of stoneware and porcelain, 25 x 46 x 25 cm.

    “My decision to add the element of movement to the existing physical balance gave birth to the open, broad, flowing motions and expanded the variety of imaginary shapes”, says Even-Chen. Her intentional break-away from defined shapes gave way to a new abundance of form, organic and free. The well-defined lines of geometric shapes were unleashed, and became the flowing lines that outline the movements of a dance, in which the body of the dancer is pushed to its limit. The flowing lines move in circles, twist, constrict and expand again. They face the material’s ability to carry itself to the limits of its natural properties.

    While her earlier works studied the foundations of the material, these works examine its potential to reach infinity. Even-Chen’s work tests the material’s point of collapse, asking which points need to be supported to prevent the structure from breaking down or falling. This constant fear of collapse can be seen even now, when the sculptures are fired and stable. Their fragility is present in each and every moment. Within this fragility lies a hidden power: the almost inconceivable resilience of gentleness.

    All of Even-Chen’s works address the tension between that which is planned and that which is not; between the expected and the unexpected. Inside the scientific thought-process, the basis of Even-Chen’s thinking, there is also a search for an emotional balance – an important element in her life, which has now found a clear outlet. But at the same time, these works continue to manifest their scientific foundation by dealing with the existence of movement within the limitations of the material.

    Even-Chen’s study of the materials she has elected to work with reveals a search for release from familiar outlines. Her dealing with organic shapes is an expression of her search for freedom within the framework of her beloved material. The conceptual framework, too, leans on that, which is known, or can be derived from accrued knowledge; or on a memory that surfaces from time to time. But this reliance is but a starting point, a jumping board towards new destinations, which may not be as familiar, but are certainly more intriguing.

    Simcha Even-Chen Ceramic exhibition at Benyamini Contemporary Ceramics Center Tel Aviv

    Balance in Motion is on through July 5, 2014, at the Benyamini Contemporary Ceramics Center, Tel Aviv.

    Even-Chen’s sculptures are autonomous bodies that stand independent of narrative or objectification. They have no practical use; one can only gaze upon them and marvel at the tackling of space, sculpting and aesthetics. In this aspect, they are unique in the field of applied ceramics. Their intrinsic presence allows the viewer to disregard the personal and psychological associations and examine them as autonomous bodies, existing in a sculpting space, evoking thoughts of an object’s place in the universe and raising for discussion values that stand apart from the body of their creator, if only for a moment. This possibility offers many different levels of coping with the artistic creation: a sort of Möbius strip that leads the eye and the hand in a seemingly paradoxical trajectory that cannot exist in the real world.

    These abstract qualities, the flow of curves in the ceramics, raise associations of the enormous sculptures of minimalist sculptor, Richard Serra. In his colossal, steel structures, Serra managed to formulate a refined minimalistic presence that has a profound effect on viewers who walk in their vicinity. Dwarfed by the presence of these monumental pieces, the viewer is invited to follow their outline and form sequential shapes, as he strolls between them or alongside them. The active walking and touching of the fierce metal bodies make the viewer a participant in the physical experience of sculpting.

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  • Lucia Pizzani: The Worshipper of the Image at Beers Contemporary, London
    June 6 - July 26, 2014

    Artist talk with Lucia Pizzani and Lorena Muñoz-Alonso: Thursday, July 3, from 7 pm.

    Courtesy the artist and Beers Contemporary, London.

    More exhibition galleries / List of ceramic art exhibitions

  • Matthew Szösz: Complications / Zane Bennett Gallery, Sante Fe

    Matthew Szosz Glass exhibition at Zane Bennett Galery

    Matthew Szösz: Complications / Zane Bennett Gallery, Sante Fe
    June 27 - July 19, 2014

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art is pleased to announce Complications, an exhibition of works in glass by Matthew Szösz. The opening is Friday, June 27, at the gallery, from 5-7 pm as part of the Railyard Arts District Last Friday Artwalk.

    Matthew Szösz, born in Providence Rhode Island, resides and practices in northern California. He holds a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts, a Bachelor’s of Industrial Design and a Master of Fine Arts in Glass all from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), and has been awarded grants by prestigious institutions in his field such as the L.C. Tiffany Foundation. Szösz has held numerous artist residencies all over the world including the Danish Royal Academy. Szösz has an extremely impressive resume for an artist of such a young age.

    Szösz’s creative process involves investigation of his chosen materials, resulting in a dance or a dialogue between artist and material. His interest lies in the moment of transformation which is what fuels his impulse to create.

    Szösz’s interest is focused on what glass can do and will do when exposed to a variety of conditions inflicted by the artist, resulting in a state of controlled chaos. Of this, Szösz states "The work produced is left deliberately unmodified as much as possible after the shaping so that the connection of the finished form to the process is emphasized to the viewer, as this relationship illustrates the central thrust of the work, that form is the result of physics, rather than the artist, and that the work itself is creator of its own identity." The invention of new techniques and processes not only keep Szösz interested in his medium, the results inform him and push his process further.

    Matthew Szösz’s latest works consist of several separate bodies of work including Inflatables, Expandables, and Rigging pieces. The Rigging pieces appear as delicate strands of rope fused together into different shapes. The viewer does not, at first realize the works in this series are glass. The minute detail in each of the Rigging works are a wonder to behold. With the Inflatables compressed air is added to fused pieces of glass while still hot, creating forms that are full and at times pillow-like.

    The Expandables are created by pulling glass apart. Inflatables and Expandables compliment each other in their opposition to each other, one feeling more solid while the other appears almost stretched and pulled to its limit, showing strength in its delicate construction. These works clearly prove Szösz’s statement: "Much of my work is an effort to achieve a synergy between opposites- order and chaos, craft and experimentation, the deliberate and the accidental, allowing two opposites to come together and complement and enhance each other."

    Matthew Szosz’s work incorporates science and art. Both the process and the outcome are equally intriguing. His work embodies, as American physician and NASA astronaut, Mae Carol Jemison so eloquently stated: "The difference between science and the arts is not that they are different sides of the same coin, or even different parts of the same continuum, but rather, they are manifestations of the same thing. The arts and sciences are avatars of human creativity."

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  • Jamie Bates Slone: Phenotypes, 2014

    I have developed a process utilizing my knowledge of various casting methods and glaze, chemistry to create forms made entirely glaze. The color and texture is appealing and repulsive at the same time. When viewed through a magnifying glass the surface resembles Scanning Electron Micrographs of cancer cells. The fragile and fleeting appearance of these pieces symbolizes the transient nature of human life. This series of glaze, casted hands represent the genetic passing of disease from generation to generation. It is my fear that my family’s history with cancer is somehow genetic.

  • Sakiyama Takayuki and Fukumoto Fuku / Joan B Mirviss, New York

    Sakiyama Takayuki and Fukumoto Fuku / Joan B Mirviss, New York
    June 10 - August 22, 2014

    Sakiyama Takayuki Ceramics exhibition at Joan B Mirviss

    Sakiyama Takayuki: Tidal Forms

    Sakiyama Takayuki (b. 1958) continues to expound on his series: Chōtō - Listening to the Waves. Focusing now on the power of the ocean, the artist created these highly sculptural ceramic works to evoke the sublime nature of the waves and currents.

    Sakiyama continues to mine the rugged coastline and beaches of his home on the Izu Peninsula for inspiration. The surfaces of his strikingly unique centrifugal forms give the appearance of having been made from sand. A special glaze that he developed highlights the intricate designs, which the artist achieves by carving the clay.  Moving and receding across the surface, the texture also echoes raked Zen Gardens. These substantial double-walled vessels maintain true to their functional origins while conveying a highly sculptural quality.

    Sakiyama’s place is firmly established in the canon of modern Japanese ceramics. Several of the artist’s vessels were recently featured in publications and exhibitions at major U.S. museums including: Through the Seasons: Japanese Art in Nature, Stone Hill Center, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA; Fired Earth, Woven Bamboo: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics and Bamboo Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and The Betsy and Robert Feinberg Collection: Japanese Ceramics for the Twenty-first Century, Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

    Additionally, the artist’s work can currently be seen in Evolution of Chinese Ceramics and Their Global Influence, a rotating installation on the Great Hall Balcony of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

    Fukumoto Fuku Ceramics exhibition at Joan B Mirviss

    Fukumoto Fuku: Lunar Forms

    A leading participant in the second generation of female ceramists to change the landscape of contemporary Japanese clay, Fukumoto Fuku (b. 1973) draws inspiration from the heavens: the moon, sun, and stars, and has achieved great recognition for her ethereal porcelain sculpture.

    Thinly walled, each wheel-thrown form is delicately positioned within another slightly larger vessel and fixed into position during the final firing by the melded glaze. Renowned for her throwing ability, Fukumoto is able to create forms that appear fragile and light that are in fact, though thinly walled, both strong and vibrant. The soft radiant white of the unglazed porcelain is highlighted by brightly colored, shiny glazes in varying tones of blue ranging from teal to powder blue that cover one surface of each of the stacked elements.

    Fukumoto uses the medium as her guide through the artistic process. Her forms arise from a reaction to the behavior of the clay during the throwing process. She stresses how this aspect of improvisation is the cornerstone of her methodology:

    “While working, I am keen to let my eyes find new discoveries, which turn the process itself into an adventure of ongoing experimentation. The image is born from within the process with every turn of the wheel, and I must always react and remain attentive to the clay’s shape and its changing condition. The form and image arise gradually, from one step of the process to another, and give birth to new creation.”

    Born into a family of textile artists, Fukumoto received her MFA from Kyoto City University of Arts, where she studied under celebrated ceramic sculptor Akiyama Yō. Her works were featured in the seminal exhibition Soaring Voices-Contemporary Japanese Women Ceramic Artists, which traveled extensively to museums both in the U.S. and abroad from 2007-2012. Currently, her work is on display in Evolution of Chinese Ceramics and Their Influence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  In addition to being actively sought after by private collectors, her works have also been acquired by American museums.

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  • Susan Phillips: Untitled, 2013
    Porcelain

  • Watt’s Up? Ceramics and Light / Bernardaud Foundation, Limoges, France

    Watt’s Up? Ceramics and Light / Bernardaud Foundation, Limoges, France
    June 13 - November 29, 2014

    Watt’s Up? explores the relationship between ceramics and light by presenting some thirty works of art from all over the world, all created in recent years. Oddly enough, this relationship seems to inspire artists more than designers, trained to create objects such as lamps. Perhaps that’s because light transcends objects and gives us a whole new take on the world. Light affects our vision by modifying our perception of space and movement. In addition, there is a symbolic, poetic and mysterious element to it. As the French author Jean Giono once put it, very clever mysteries hide in the light. If light and ceramics go hand in hand, it’s mainly courtesy of porcelain’s unique properties of translucency, which can give light – produced by a candle or a tungsten filament – a soft, poetic aura and elicit a feeling of wonder. Ceramics offers a broad palette of sensations to play with. Faience is heavy, glossy and sensual in its interaction with light. Pottery absorbs lux units and asserts its own material plasticity to counter the intangible nature of light. Porcelain is lightweight and translucent, and the matte aspect of unglazed biscuit forms a striking contrast with the gloss of the glaze. Watt’s Up? is an unprecedented investigation of the latest innovations and know-how, both sensorial and intellectual in scope. As the topic was complex and broke new ground, it took nearly two years of research to bring these thirty or so works together. These works are by fifteen artists exhibiting for the first time in France. They are the result of technical prowess – manual and technical – as well as fresh creative thinking. None of them represent any particular school of thought, creative trend or artistic movement. Each work is an explosion of creativity, born of the artist’s reflections and inspiring a sense of wonder. This exhibition sheds new light on the art of ceramics.

    Curated by Cédric Morisset
    A double major in art history and cultural management, Cédric Morisset started out in contemporary art and gravitated towards design. He then moved into curating art shows, starting in 2003 at the invitation of the international design biennial in Lisbon and continuing in this line of work for several exhibitions presented in France and other countries, including French Reference (Shanghai and Canton, 2008), Icons of Design (Sao Paulo, 2009) and Nouvelle Vague (Milan, 2011 and 2013). Cédric Morisset contributes articles on design to AD magazine and the daily newspaper Le Figaro on a regular basis. From 2010 to 2012, he served as head curator for the annual AD Interieurs exhibition held by AD magazine. Since 2013, Cédric Morisset has headed the design department at the PIASA auction house in Paris.

    Exhibiting artists

    Frances and Dominic Bromley Ceramics

    Frances & Dominic Bromley, Shoal 1672, 2008, Natural unglazed English fine bone china © Mark Wood Photography

    Frances & Dominic Bromley
    Since Frances & Dominic Bromley started their design studio Scabetti in 1999, their work in ceramics has earned considerable critical acclaim in the UK and across the world. Their designs are light, precise and elegant, and realised in fine bone china in their studio in Leek, North Staffordshire. Their first venture into light sculpture in 2004, was inspired by moths being attracted to candle light. Drawn to the Light, was composed of sculpted curved elements made out of bone china which appeared to be floating around the central light source. During London’s Design Festival in 2007, the couple presented Shoal, a suspended light sculpture suggesting a school of fish with more than 1500 bone china elements. These pieces paved the way for a series of bespoke commissions, which are now a Scabetti specialty. One commission for the International Maritime Organisation had 3,434 stylised bone china anchors arranged in a 5m tall sculpture and is on permanent display at their London Headquarters. Frances & Dominic Bromley have created Ascension especially for the Watt’s Up exhibition and their imagination has reached new heights. This new installation, made of English fine bone china, features hundreds of human forms that seem to be rising through the air towards the light. The creative talent of this design duo has added poetry to technical expertise.

    Frances Bromley (b. 1969) and Dominic Bromley (b. 1971) majored in Industrial Design at Brunel University, London. They live and work in Leek, near Stoke-on-Trent, England.

    Jeremy Cole Ceramics

    Jeremy Cole, Cymbidium chandelier, 2012, Porcelain © Lindsay Keats

    Jeremy Cole
    The master artisan from New Zealand has been highly sought-after by the luxury sector since 2005. His remarkable porcelain lighting fixtures are inspired by the plant kingdom (e.g. flax, aloe vera, a chyrsalis or orchids). In his studio on the other side of the world, he creates beautifully crafted masterpieces that end up in Bulgari or Harry Winston show windows or at Four Seasons hotels. His unique lamps feature spectacular, poetic forms that imitate Nature; his magical lighting can make them look stylish, disturbing or amusing. And the porcelain orchids in his hanging lamp Cymbidium Orchid actually look dead until the light is turned on, making them come vibrantly alive.

    Born in 1973 Jeremy Cole is a self-taught artists. He lives and works in Wellington, New Zealand.

    Coup de foudre: Goedel Vermandere and Jan Arickx Ceramics

    Coup de foudre: Goedel Vermandere & Jan Arickx, La Vierge, 2010, Porcelain © Peter Verplancke

    Coup de foudre: Goedel Vermandere & Jan Arickx
    Goedel Vermandere used to teach school but became a ceramic artist in the mid 2000s. In 2004, she met an event planner named Jan and it was love at first sight… including at the professional level. As a design team, they went on to create light sculptures from cast porcelain that were remarkable for their sensuous quality and their harmony. The pair also works in steel, copper, stainless steel, paper and tree bark. They are always experimenting with new techniques to illuminate porcelain’s transparence more effectively, express a feeling of warmth and fulfillment, and open up new horizons.” Their creations – whether a hanging lamp forming a horizontal line in space, a standing lamp like a totem pole or a suspended lamp as round as a full moon – are striking for their simplicity and originality. One reason is that each of their pieces, which are fired gradually, starting at a low temperature and building up to 1260°C, is fashioned from hundreds of translucent porcelain petals and gives off a soft, romantic light. This talented twosome knows how to use technical skill to create poetry.

    Goedel Vermandere (b. 1969) is a school teacher trained in ceramics at Syntra-West, Bruges. Jan Arickx (b. 1959) is an event planner. They live and work in Courtrai, Belgium.

    Pucci de Rossi Ceramics

    Pucci de Rossi, Cartona, 2007, Porcelain © Made

    Pucci de Rossi
    Born in Verona, Italy, the artist and designer Pucci de Rossi moved to Paris in 1979. In step with the Memphis Art Movement, launched in Italy in 1981, he influenced the European art and design scene of the 1980s and 1990s. Throughout his career, he developed the wildly poetic side of his nature, not to mention his unbridled imagination. Constantly seeking to reinvent and reinterpret, he liked to use ordinary materials like lead or cardboard to create elegant, highly imaginative objects, and to turn preconceived ideas upside down. Poking fun at the “art or design” controversy, which is still raging, the artist gave everyday objects an ironic narrative treatment that rendered them precious. In the last decade, De Rossi exhibited at art galleries in Paris, such as Catberro, Downtown (François Laffanour) and Anne de Villepoix. Not only did his work impress collectors, but creations bearing his signature made their way into the collections of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. His designs were produced by the editor Made who suggested In 2001 to release limited editions of his one-off objects. Among the latter were Dondola (rocking chair with book shelf, 2004) and his Cartona lamp (2005), which is presented in this exhibition and pays tribute – whether intentionally or not – to Arte Povera. Using fine porcelain to imitate humble cardboard, this creation flirts with contrasts and brings a little whimsy to everyday life.

    Pucci de Rossi, 1947-2013

    Bernadette Doolan Ceramics

    Bernadette Doolan, Nostalgia, 2008, Porcelain © Rory Nolan

    Bernadette Doolan
    For more than fifteen years, the Irish artist Bernadette Doolan has been creating works marked by their intimacy. She sets out to capture and express emotions in porcelain and bronze as well as in her paintings. “My work focuses on life, from the cradle to the grave and everything in between… on our dreams, desires and fears” she explains. The work presented in this show is an assemblage of illuminated box panels using engraved porcelain, which looks different depending on whether the lights are on or off. The artist is interested in our memories and in the motifs, landscapes and impressions stored in our subconscious. “I use objects that are meaningful in a personal way, such as the lace from a First Communion dress, to print on the porcelain surface,” comments Bernadette Doolan. “Sometimes, I even use plastic bubble-wrap, because I love the sound that the bubbles make when they pop!” When the panels are illuminated, the pattern communicates the emotions inherent in the private experience to the viewer.

    Born in 1973 Bernadette Doolan is a self-taught artist. She lives and works in Wexford, Ireland.

    Volker Haug Ceramics

    Volker Haug, Rudolf, 2012, Porcelain © Paul Allister

    Volker Haug
    Based in Melbourne, Australia, the German-born designer Volker Haug designs one-off artisanal lighting creations. He got the idea for his clever Rudolf pendant from the double adaptors to be found on plastic lights in Berlin. The designer amused himself dreaming up all sorts of combinations. After a trip to Milan and a conversation with Ingo Maurer, a master of lighting design, Volker Haug returned to Australia determined to use porcelain for his Antler line. Rudolf revisits traditional chandelier design by assembling porcelain modules in every direction, combining industrial style with porcelain craftsmanship; modularity with unity.

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