Interview with Brian Kakas - Artist of the month, January 2012

Interview with ceramic artist Brian Kakas - Artist of the month, January 2012

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→ The full interview with Brian Kakas is featured in Ceramics Now Magazine - Issue Two.

Ceramics Now Magazine
: There is visible consistency in your creation. What was the starting point in your investigation with ceramic art?

Brian Kakas: The starting for my works comes from the traditional vessel and understanding the primary elements in design. I have taken the elements of the foot, body and lip of a pot and applied them as more structural elements within my sculptural designs. Development of a language within these components has allowed the works to maintain continuity through the progression of forms. The works become more refined as I focus on transitions of lines and volume. Complexity in the structures, are inspired from marine life, geological formations, buildings, bridge design and armor. With the creation of all my works I try to stay true to the inherent properties of the materials. 

Your works reveal a very rigorous methodology. Tell us more about the process of constructing them. Do you make preliminary drawings?

I used to draw blueprints for my pottery and sculptures. But the works always seemed to lose something in the translation from 2D to 3D. I think the spontaneity of the sketch and energy never quite translated. Once I began using slump and drapes molds I began to only sketch gestural drawings with ink. This allowed me take an idea (not a concrete design) and began to find new forms through exploring hidden lines within objects while only maintaining the idea of the gesture. I apply the gestural line I am looking for onto the X, Y and Z axis of the object in order to maintain flow and control of the entire 3 dimensional space it occupies. I am working with a modular mold system, which allows me to create an inventory of parts to pick and choose from freely. This system allows me to maintain being in a “state of art” while exploring new forms. The sculptures are hollow and all have an inherent strength as I complete lines whether circular or elliptical, symmetrical or asymmetrical. Then I construct a lip on the vessels using armature, just like ribs in an airplane wing or in a boat hull. The ribs create a template to be covered with slabs, which accentuates the forms I have already created. The tensile strength of this element keeps the hollow forms from warping or moving during the firing process.

Brian Kakas - Contemporary Ceramic Sculptures

Architectonics – Hull Improv, side view, 2011. White stoneware, slab built, 38”L x 18”W x 17”H, Cone 04 Oxidation - View his works

Tell us more about large scale fabrication. Taking the size into consideration, have you confronted with some particular technological problems?

I found through many accidents, the importance of the foundation you build on.  There were many cracking issues early on in the high arches of the sculptures. I thought it was uneven displacement of weight that could be resolved by building additional supports that were fired with the works. But with continual cracking at the point of the supports I began reviewing the overall movement of the pieces throughout the shrinkage stages, from cone 04 to cone 10 the problems were the same.

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Brian Kakas

Brian Kakas Contemporary ceramic artist

Brian Kakas' profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

Appropriate means of creatively adapting to continual changes have been expressed though practices of art, architecture, science and technology. In this new body of ceramic works, entitled “Tectonic Perceptions”, the intentions are incorporating methodologies and theories from the mentioned practices to create a “new nature” in structural design for ceramic objects. The pieces seek to celebrate the versatility of clay with an aim of fostering new realizations of architectural space. Travels throughout Asia and an array of rich cultural experiences in China have brought about new realizations within the artist’s mind and perceptions of cultural identity, history and space.

These relationships have allowed the artist to explore relationships between the strong elements of tradition and modern identities rapidly evolving around the world. Explorations of these interrelationships and the intentions of the maker and his material have led to the new structural ceramic designs. Through his aspired process of invention, it is the artist’s intent to find a natural form by staying true to chosen materials and their inherent properties. The artist is in pursuit of finding and establishing a formal vocabulary that allows sculptural vessels to exhibit qualities of both unique and handcrafted objects of traditional cultures with that of machine made and mass-produced objects of our contemporary society.

Brian Kakas is an Assistant Professor of Ceramics at Northern Michigan University. He received his MFA in ceramics from The University of Notre Dame in 2007.

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Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions - Hull Series, side view, 2011. White stoneware, slab built, 31” H x 21”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions - Hull Series, side view, 2011. White stoneware, slab built, 31” H x 21”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #10, 2010. White stoneware, slab built, 24”H x18”W x 19”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #10, 2010. White stoneware, slab built, 24”H x18”W x 19”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #9, alternative view, 2010. White stoneware, slab built, 31”H x23”W x 33”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #9, alternative view, 2010. White stoneware, slab built, 31”H x23”W x 33”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #7, 2010. White stoneware, slab built,  33”H x 26”W x 28”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #7, 2010. White stoneware, slab built,  33”H x 26”W x 28”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Wing Series, 2011White stoneware, slab built, 29” H x 24”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Wing Series, 2011
White stoneware, slab built, 29” H x 24”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #5, 2008White Stoneware, slab built, 43” H x 28”W x 35”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #5, 2008
White Stoneware, slab built, 43” H x 28”W x 35”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #4, 2008White Stoneware, slab built, 44” H x 34”W x 37”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #4, 2008
White Stoneware, slab built, 44” H x 34”W x 37”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #3, 2008White Stoneware, slab built, 38” H x 29”W x 33”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #3, 2008
White Stoneware, slab built, 38” H x 29”W x 33”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Nautilus Series, Detail image, 2011White stoneware, slab built, 32” H x 23”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Nautilus Series, Detail image, 2011
White stoneware, slab built, 32” H x 23”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Nautilus Series, 2011White stoneware, slab built, 32” H x 23”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Nautilus Series, 2011
White stoneware, slab built, 32” H x 23”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #6, 2010White stoneware, slab built, 29”H x 26”W x 24”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #6, 2010
White stoneware, slab built, 29”H x 26”W x 24”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #4, 2010White stoneware, slab built, 32”H x 25”W x 23”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #4, 2010
White stoneware, slab built, 32”H x 25”W x 23”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Architectonics – Wing, wall mount, 2011White stoneware, slab built, 35”L x 22”W x 15”H, Cone 04 Oxidation

Brian Kakas: Architectonics – Wing, wall mount, 2011
White stoneware, slab built, 35”L x 22”W x 15”H, Cone 04 Oxidation