Els Wenselaers: Human Hybrid with Racemouse, 2009, 25 x 80 x 30 cm, Ceramics, white glaze, slibs, leather, rubber, metal

Els Wenselaers: Human Hybrid with Racemouse, 2009, 25 x 80 x 30 cm, Ceramics, white glaze, slibs, leather, rubber, metal

Buy Issue nr. 1 of Ceramics Now Magazine

Ceramics Now Magazine is the newest contemporary ceramic art publication in the world. We present exclusive interviews with world-renowned artists, high quality images with their works, and news from the ceramics field. With over 2000 works and 50 published interviews, the magazine is in top 3 most trusted online publications of contemporary ceramics.

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Arthur Gonzalez’s work is on the cover of the Ceramics Now Magazine Winter 2011-2012 issue, introducing an amazing interview about his work. The issue also features Roxanne Jackson’s work, as well as two partnerships with the Denver Art Museum (Overthrown: Clay Without Limits) and Keiko Gallery (Japanese artists).

Issue nr. 1 also presents interviews and articles with new and world-renowned ceramic artists: Claire Muckian, Carol Gouthro, Ian F. Thomas, Cynthia Lahti, Carole Epp, Simcha Even-Chen, Liza Riddle, Patrick Colhoun, Mark Goudy, Chang Hyun Bang, Ian Shelly, Shamai Gibsh, Margrieta Jeltema, John Shirley, Jim Kraft, Connie Norman, Blaine Avery, Antonella Cimatti, Maciej Kasperski, Wim Borst, Merete Rasmussen.

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Kjersti Lunde

Kjersti Lunde Norwegian Ceramics

Kjersti Lunde's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

“Every day we are surrounded by objects of different character. Objects we either know from before or new things we’ve never seen. Created by nature or shaped by human hands. We distinguish between the known and unknown, and make new discoveries. What is known from before we often find in our home environment and community, and the more unknown objects we find when traveling or in new surroundings. I approach the objects in the exposition with different artistic strategies, and a transformation process that examines functional, sculptural and cultural issues.

In the selection of an object to work with, I look for what exudes a certain history and experience. By my hand, the objects are then transformed into new stories, and re-created objects. The original objects emerge as raw materials, in which their parts are recreated into wholes, with a desire to capture the time between past and present. The intention is to add something new and different to an object’s inherent character. Together these objects link together as small elements in a storytelling collection, and reveal a hidden story.” Kjersti Lunde

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Kjersti Lunde: The Altered Object = New Manipulated Presence, 2008 - Installation, porcelain and stoneware (Photo: Bjarte Bjørkum, Khib)

Kjersti Lunde: The Altered Object = New Manipulated Presence, 2008 - Installation, porcelain and stoneware (Photo: Bjarte Bjørkum, Khib)

Brian Kakas

Brian Kakas Contemporary ceramic artist

Brian Kakas' profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

Appropriate means of creatively adapting to continual changes have been expressed though practices of art, architecture, science and technology. In this new body of ceramic works, entitled “Tectonic Perceptions”, the intentions are incorporating methodologies and theories from the mentioned practices to create a “new nature” in structural design for ceramic objects. The pieces seek to celebrate the versatility of clay with an aim of fostering new realizations of architectural space. Travels throughout Asia and an array of rich cultural experiences in China have brought about new realizations within the artist’s mind and perceptions of cultural identity, history and space.

These relationships have allowed the artist to explore relationships between the strong elements of tradition and modern identities rapidly evolving around the world. Explorations of these interrelationships and the intentions of the maker and his material have led to the new structural ceramic designs. Through his aspired process of invention, it is the artist’s intent to find a natural form by staying true to chosen materials and their inherent properties. The artist is in pursuit of finding and establishing a formal vocabulary that allows sculptural vessels to exhibit qualities of both unique and handcrafted objects of traditional cultures with that of machine made and mass-produced objects of our contemporary society.

Brian Kakas is an Assistant Professor of Ceramics at Northern Michigan University. He received his MFA in ceramics from The University of Notre Dame in 2007.

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Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #9, alternative view, 2010. White stoneware, slab built, 31”H x23”W x 33”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #9, alternative view, 2010. White stoneware, slab built, 31”H x23”W x 33”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #4, 2008White Stoneware, slab built, 44” H x 34”W x 37”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #4, 2008
White Stoneware, slab built, 44” H x 34”W x 37”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #4, 2010White stoneware, slab built, 32”H x 25”W x 23”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions #4, 2010
White stoneware, slab built, 32”H x 25”W x 23”L, Cone 9 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Architectonics – Nautilus Improv 2, alternative side view, 2011White stoneware, slab built, 26”L x 23”W x 33”H, Cone 04 Oxidation

Brian Kakas: Architectonics – Nautilus Improv 2, alternative side view, 2011
White stoneware, slab built, 26”L x 23”W x 33”H, Cone 04 Oxidation

Brian Kakas: Architectonics – Improv 2, 2011White stoneware, slab built, 21”L x 13”W x 8”H, Cone 04 Oxidation

Brian Kakas: Architectonics – Improv 2, 2011
White stoneware, slab built, 21”L x 13”W x 8”H, Cone 04 Oxidation