Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

Exhibitions

Fragile! In Transit / Traveling exhibition around Europe

Fragile! In Transit project, Traveling exhibition around Europe

Fragile! In Transit / Traveling exhibition around Europe
2012-2013

Next stop: Milkwood Gallery, Cardiff, Wales
41 Lochaber Street, Roath, Cardiff CF24 3LS

Dates: March 14-25, 2013
Opening Reception: March 22, from 6 pm.

Fragile! In Transit is the initial project of the Project Network 3 (three) collective, a group of 9 ceramic artists from across Europe. Throughout the course of one year, the artists are sending 9 pieces of work on a journey by post to each of their countries of residence. Fragile! In Transit engages with and responds directly to the notion of place, identity and culture. All the work is designed to fit into a prescribed box of similar format and together forms an exhibition centering on the balance between reality, fiction and perception of place. The project has already travelled to Ireland, Denmark and England. Upcoming destinations include Finland and Italy.

Artists: Elodie Alexandre - France/India, Roberta Giussani - Italy, Joseph Hopkinson - Wales, Katja Kotikoski - Finland, Claire Muckian - Northern Ireland, Eglė Pakšytė - Lithuania, Jill Shaddock - England, Helene Søs Schjødts - Denmark, Katie Spragg - England.

The group met at a six week symposium for recent ceramic graduates at Guldagergaard International Ceramic Centre in Denmark last year.

Follow the exhibition on its journey at www.facebook.com/FragileInTransit

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  • Made By Hand project & Darien Johnson / The Clay Studio, Philadelphia, USA

    Made By Hand project & Darien Johnson exhibition at The Clay Studio, Philadelphia

    Made By Hand project & Darien Johnson exhibition / The Clay Studio, Philadelphia, USA
    17 August - September 30, 2012

    Over the next few months, The Clay Studio will produce a multi part project, titled MADE BY HAND, exploring the relevance of handmade tableware in the 21st century. Two exhibitions are produced in support of this:

    Derek Au
    Derek Au, is American born of Chinese descent. Educated in the USA he currently lives in Jingdezhen China known for its rich history in ceramic art. Au’s work is a mixture of Eastern and Western cultures, true for the entire field of American Ceramics, and a mix of historic ceramic tradition and contemporary design. His work is inspired by origami, Song Dynasty Qingbai ware and tinware using the forms and methods of its production so prevalent in Jingdezhen. His materials of choice, a porcelain clay body covered by a celadon glaze, are rooted in centuries old tradition, the perfect foil for his minimal and contemporary forms.

    Post At Rest
    Pots at Rest engages eight ceramists as curators and exhibiting artists: Kari Radasch, Elizabeth Robinson, Lorna Meaden, Ingrid Bathe, Brian Jones, Munemitsu Taguchi, Matthew Hyleck, and Joseph Pintz. All are nationally recognized mid-career makers of tableware selected for the strength of his/her work: the conceptual content, formal qualities and his/her personal aesthetic. As a group they represent a broad range of material use, varied form and the primary processes of making and surfacing. All bring with them an extensive knowledge of the field, professional contacts, and buyers for their work. Each Artist/Curator was assigned a piece of equipment or furniture, typical to most kitchens, where pots when not in use, live or rest. Each selected functional wares for these spaces made by ceramicists from across North America whose work they admire and respect and share their reasons why they believe handmade tableware remains relevant in the 21st century.

    An exhibition featuring works by Darien Johnson will be on view at the Banovitz Space:

    "How does absorbing information through digital media define a person’s notion of reality? Current technologies facilitate the instantaneous acquisition, manipulation, and subsequent redistribution of perceptual experiences. This recording and transfer of ideas enables people to have a shallow understanding of something without having truly experienced it. How does this affect our interpretation of “real?”

    Stemming from an awareness of continually altered states of perceptual consciousness, my work represents the entanglement of human cognition and digital processing. By acquiring and manipulating visual information, I act as the human element while directly engaging in this process I question. The digital compositions are then china painted onto the porcelain forms, which I create as manifestations of the seemingly fluid movement of human cognition.” Darien Johnson

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  • CHANGE Exhibition / Ceramic Centre Furnace Pagliero, Castellamonte, Italy

    CHANGE Contemporary Ceramic Art exhibition at the Ceramic Centre Furnace Pagliero, Castellamonte, Italy

    CHANGE Exhibition / Ceramic Centre Furnace Pagliero, Castellamonte, Italy
    28 July - 7 October, 2012

    Change, an innovative title that wants to send a strong message about the communicative potential of ceramics in contemporary art world. The objective is clear: it is Castellamonte, the city of stoves, together with the furnace Pagliero, the oldest factory in the suburb wisely restored by owner Daniel Chechi, now a center avant-garde cultural production and to send a new message on the potential and the language of contemporary ceramics. A spirit of continuity with the past, but also breaking, where twelve artists invited to exhibit created specific works of great communicative power, which are fully included in the Olympus of contemporary art.

    Artists: Silvia Calcagno, Terry Davies, Mariano Fuga, Gian Genta, Rita Miranda, Simone Negri, Brenno Fish, Jasmine Pignatelli, Franco Rampi, Paola Staccioli
    Curator: Silvia Campese

    The artists, selected as the most important names in art pottery, have identified a specific site within the architectural splendor of the furnace, creating the appropriate specific interventions designed for the site.

    A separate section is devoted to the potter Savona Sandro Lorenzini, the author appreciated not only in Europe, which has made almost all the works shown in the Furnace Pagliero, invited by Daniele Chechi as an “artist in residence”.

    The show joins “The metaphysical dream” by Giorgio de Chirico and Lisa Sotilis and “Figures of fire” by Bernard Aubertin, Elio Torrieri, Lilian Rita Callegari, and Umberto Mastroianni. A complex work, supported by the critical point of view by the Director of the International Museum of Applied Arts Today MIAAO, Enzo Biffi Gentili.

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  • Summer Exhibition 2012 / Erskine Hall & Coe Gallery, London

    Summer exhibition 2012 at Erskine Hall & Coe Gallery, London

    Summer Exhibition 2012 / Erskine Hall & Coe Gallery, London, UK
    25 July - 30 August, 2012

    Artists: Sebastian Blackie, Claudi Casanovas, Peter Collingwood, Tanya Gomez, Matthew Harris, Deirdre Hawthorne, Steven Heinemann, Shozo Michikawa, Gustavo Pérez, Tim Rowan, Anna Vannotti

    Erskine, Hall & Coe specialise in 20th Century and Contemporary ceramics. The gallery is in central Mayfair, off Bond Street, at 15 Royal Arcade.

    The gallery carries an extensive stock of ceramics, often including works by, Lucie Rie and Hans Coper, Jennifer Lee, Gwyn Hanssen Pigott, Shozo Michikawa and Sara Flynn. Its ten annual exhibitions feature the work of British and international artists, in some cases exploring the interplay between ceramics, sculptures and paintings.

    Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday: 10 am - 6 pm, Saturday: 10 am - 6 pm (during exhibitions only).

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  • Wouter Dam exhibition / Galerie NeC, Hong Kong

    Wouter Dam exhibition at Galerie NeC Hong Kong

    Wouter Dam exhibition / Galerie NeC, Hong Kong
    28 June - 18 August, 2012

    "The ceramic sculptures I make, do steadily develop along a clear line, this last group of sculptures here on show are slightly larger and with more unbroken circles incorporated into the sculpture, in this way slowly revealing more of its origins, the vase and bowl shape.

    The sculptures are closed and curled on to itself and in this way, keeping more of it’s secret, enticing you to explore the almost hidden inside of the sculpture.
    They are covered with a coloured engobe, the latest colours I have introduced are the soft pink, a light porcelain blue, and a grey tone. All these colours are specifically chosen to enhance the shape and to give a good contrast in between light and shade.

    The sculptures are built up of elements made on the potterswheel, assembled when leatherhard, every one of them becoming a unique sculpture, although clearly belonging to the same family of shapes.

    The sculptures are like drawing lines in space, making the clay seem weightless. The edges are refined and cut through the air in contrast to the soft voluminous exterior surfaces that bask in the light.” Wouter Dam, 2012

    Gallery Hours: Monday to Saturday, 11 am - 8 pm. Sunday 1 pm - 6 pm.

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  • Pisgah Forest and Nonconnah: The Potteries of Walter B. Stephen / McKissick Museum

    Pisgah Forest and Nonconnah: The Potteries of Walter B. Stephen exhibition / McKissick Museum

    Pisgah Forest and Nonconnah: The Potteries of Walter B. Stephen / University of South Carolina McKissick Museum, Columbia, SC, USA
    May 26 – July 27, 2012

    Some of the most imaginative and beautiful ceramics of the 20th century will be on display in an exhibition of Walter B. Stephen’s pottery May 26 – July 27 at the University of South Carolina’s McKissick Museum.

    Titled “Pisgah Forest and Nonconnah: The Potteries of Walter B. Stephen,” the exhibition will feature 76 rare examples of Stephen’s works, from the first pots that he fired near Nonconnah Creek in Tennessee to crystalline vessels produced at Pisgah Forest near Asheville.

    Stephen, born in 1876 in Clinton, Iowa, was heavily influenced by his mother, but he  soon began exploring and developing his own creative talents. In 1904, he established the Nonconnah Pottery in Tennessee, where he and his mother produced “paste on paste” cameo wares similar to Wedgwood’s Jasperwares. In 1913, he moved to the Asheville area, where he produced a variety of pottery until his death in1961.

    The early Nonconnah pieces are dominated by matte-green glazes with floral designs. The later works made at the Pisgah Forest Pottery range from small, brightly glazed teapots and cups to monumental baptismal fonts. Cameo depictions of the American West include covered wagons, Indians hunting Buffalo and portraits of Bill Cody. Stephen also used imagery of the South such as mountain cabins, fiddlers and Gen. Robert E. Lee. His forms and glazes, particularly the crystalline glaze, were inspired by Asian ceramics.

    Two events are planned in connection with the exhibition:

    On June 21, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. the museum will host a reception, a gallery talk and a book signing featuring Rodney Leftwich, author of “Pisgah Forest and Nonconnah: The Potteries of Walter B. Stephen.”

    From 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Friday, June 22, McKissick will host a symposium, “The Art of Collecting Southern Pottery.”  Leftwich, Karen Swager of Brunk Auctions, crystalline potter Frank Neef, Winton Eugene and Rosa Eugene of Pottery by Eugene, and Barbara S. Perry, who writes about  American ceramics, will participate.

    The symposium is $40 for museum members and $50 for non-members.

    Museum Hours: Monday-Friday: 8:30 am - 5 pm. Saturday: 11 am - 3 pm. Closed Sundays and all University and State holidays.
    Open to the public free of charge.

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  • Ehren Tool: Production or Destruction / Craft and Folk Art Museum, Los Angeles

    Ehren Tool: Production or Destruction exhibition Craft and Folk Art Museum, Los Angeles

    Ehren Tool: Production or Destruction / Craft and Folk Art Museum, Los Angeles, USA
    May 27 – September 9, 2012

    Former Marine and ceramist Ehren Tool exhibits war awareness work at CAFAM.

    Opening reception: Saturday, May 26, 6 – 9 pm.

    “The best way to destroy your enemy is to make him your friend.” – Abraham Lincoln

    Coinciding with Memorial Day, the Craft and Folk Art Museum (CAFAM) presents Ehren Tool: Production or Destruction, a solo exhibition of ceramist and former Marine, Ehren Tool. Emblazoned with the haunting imagery of armed conflict, Tool creates handmade ceramic cups as a medium to address war and the violent rhetoric and imagery used to perpetuate it. The exhibition will feature 1,000 handcrafted cups, video, installation, photographs, and printed materials.

    Twenty years after his service in the first Gulf War, Tool’s firsthand contact with the reality of war is manifest in the thousands of cups he dutifully produces. The cups will be exhibited at CAFAM in “units” based on military formations of “squads” (13), “platoons” (55), and “companies” (225), serving as a visual reminder of each Marine within a military unit. Each cup is uniquely crafted, decorated with ceramic decals of soldiers’ photos, propaganda, war porn, and sculptural reliefs shaped like bombs, guns, or medals.

    Recent events such as the Occupy movements and the incendiary language of current election campaigns figure strongly in his new work, as well as veteran suicides and stories of U.S. Marines desecrating bodies of the deceased. Other imagery alludes to the culpability of video games, toys, and pornography in desensitizing the public to the emotional toll of war.

    Tool insists that his art is not anti-war, and prefers to characterize it as “war awareness” work. “It is not my intention to teach or preach. It is not possible to communicate the pain, waste, or intensity of war. My work deals with the uneasy collision, and collusion, between military and civilian cultures,” he says.

    By putting people in contact with the imagery of war through an everyday household item, he hopes to make people think more often about war and it’s consequences in a meaningful way. “Letter to President Obama” (2009) is among the several letters he wrote to national and corporate heads urging them to consider the outcome of supporting continued war efforts. He also sent a cup to each of these leaders, which elicited responses from politicians such as Karl Rove.

    Though the cups are functional drinking vessels, they are also memory objects that contain unspoken stories about fallen soldiers and wounded survivors. The installation “393” (2004) is a striking display of 393 shattered cups that represent the number of U.S. combat casualties during the first year of the second Gulf War. In the video “1.5 Second War Memorial,” a different cup is shot to pieces every 1.5 seconds, each signifying a soldier or civilian who has died in a war.

    Tool will be on-site at CAFAM for an artist residency between June 1 and June 15, where he will set up a ceramic studio in the courtyard to encourage public conversations and share his work in progress. He will be giving away all the cups he makes at CAFAM.

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  • Oh la la - Majolica… a Pottery Slam, by Peder Rasmussen and Michael Geertsen / Copenhagen Ceramics

    Oh la la - Majolica & a Pottery Slam, by Peder Rasmussen and Michael Geertsen at Copenhagen Ceramics

    Oh la la - Majolica … a Pottery Slam, by Peder Rasmussen and Michael Geertsen / Copenhagen Ceramics, Denmark
    May 24 - June 16, 2012

    Artists talk: Saturday, 26 May at 2 pm.

    With their common educational background in the now almost vanished pottery tradition, Danish ceramists Michael Geertsen and Peder Rasmussen are challenging themselves and each other in an exhibition-tour-de-force within a classic ceramics discipline, the Majolica – tradition. Not only have they produced their individual works – but occasionally they have left the decorating of their own pieces to the other.

    Michael Geertsen and Peder Rasmussen both belong to the small group of  contemporary ceramists, who also apprenticed as potters  – in their certificates termed as free-hand-throwers.
    As young they found themselves in a world of age-old crafts and were thus among the last links in a very long chain.

    Speaking of this, they say: ’We both share great love of classic pottery; of the idea of the vessel and the ceramic figure as artistic medium, even in a world being ever more technological, as far from our starting point as can be imagined. Does this show in our work?  Is there any reminiscence  of something archetypical still present in our otherwise highly contemporary expression? In our own opinion, yes!  We actually insist that our education within a tradition-bound craft has imbued us
    with a deep respect for  professionalism. It has also provided us with a reservoir of references – possibilities for ’professional quoting’. Anything goes. With the apprenticeship-certificate as baggage, we know that there are lots of unoccupied seats within the space of tradition’.

    This time both ceramists work with Majolica, the age-old technique of white-glazed and decorated earthenware, known especially from the Italian renaissance. From the great artists of the Della Robbia dynasty or the Deruta-workshops. Hispano-Mauresque faience, too, has been in their view with its ornamentation, lustres and other metallic effects. The technique itself tempts with a richness of colour unequalled in other techniques, thus offering possibilities for new stories, stylistic approaches and quotes.

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  • Craft Spoken Here / Philadelphia Museum of Art

    Craft Spoken Here exhibition at Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, USA

    Craft Spoken Here / Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, USA
    May 5 - August 12, 2012

    Crafts were prominent among the first works of art to enter the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art when it was founded in 1876, and the Museum has continued to collect and exhibit crafts. Today, thanks in large part to the Women’s Committee and gifts from individuals, the Museum is particularly well-known for its holdings of twentieth-and twenty-first-century American, European, and Asian craft.

    With Craft Spoken Here, the Museum seizes the opportunity to experiment with its collection and to understand craft in an international context. Some forty contemporary works from 1960 to the present in ceramic, glass, metal, wood, lacquer, paper, and fiber—some by living, acclaimed artists and others by lesser-known creators—are on view. Representing the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe, the works highlight formal qualities that cross cultures, time, and media.

    Craft Spoken Here features an array of engaging education programs and interpretive materials, including on-site artist demonstrations and hands-on craftmaking activities for the public.

    The exhibition is divided into three sections. Essential Element looks at continuing importance of line—the graphic gesture—as an expressive and compositional element in the work of artists. Rebecca Medel’s The One (1985) uses a network of lines to form a dense cube of knotted cotton and linen threads, dark on its fringes and progressively lighter towards the center, which creates the illusion of a luminous sphere floating in an atmospheric haze. The second section, Shape Shifting, includes works in clay, glass, wood, metal, paper, and fiber materials that have been fashioned into sculptural forms. Motoko Maio’s Kotodama (2008) is a folding screen in silk and linen that can be adjusted to divide a room, provide privacy, or rest decoratively in a corner. The final section is Gesture, which includes works that offer visual and emotional cues, such as the chaotic, seemingly uncontrollable framework of Jessica Jane Julius’s Static (c. 2008), in which hundreds of black glass flameworked threads combine in a sculptural evocation of the artist’s reoccurring dream.

    Curator
    Elisabeth Agro, The Nancy M. McNeil Associate Curator of American Modern and Contemporary Crafts and Decorative Arts

    The exhibition is made possible by The Leonard and Norma Klorfine Foundation Fund for Modern and Contemporary Craft. Additional support is provided by the Windgate Charitable Foundation and the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In-kind support is provided courtesy of Lion Brand Yarn.

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  • Langenthal retrospective / Musée Ariana, Geneva, Switzerland

    The Langenthal porcelain manufactory. From industrial design to Sunday china, Musee Ariana, Geneva

    Langenthal retrospective / Musée Ariana, Geneva, Switzerland
    May 23 - November 25, 2012

    Opening reception: Wednesday, May 22 at 6.30 pm.

    #1
    The Langenthal porcelain manufactory. From industrial design to Sunday china

    The fascinating history of the only 20th century Swiss porcelain factory began in 1906 in the Bernese town of Langenthal. Deeply rooted in the Swiss identity, the porcelain manufactory Langenthal SA – affectionately known by its workers as the “Porzi” – became noted for its cutting-edge technology, the diversity of its products as well as the quality of its porcelain. The artistic output followed the dominant aesthetic currents of the century while still preserving its local character. From Art Nouveau and Art Deco to the deliciously “vintage” designs of the 1950s and 1960s, from pseudo-rustic to avant-garde propositions, from collaborations with artists and designers to the influence of the artistic directors of the manufactory, the history of Langenthal is closely linked to the evolution of taste.

    This collaboration with the Langenthal manufactory has been an opportunity to update the rich archives : hand-painted design books, catalogues of forms and motifs, publicity leaflets and brochures, archive photos. Loans from public and private institutions enrich and complete the important collection of the Musée Ariana (over 1000 pieces). All the conditions have been met to allow a portrait to be drawn of 20th century industrial porcelain in Switzerland.

    The History of A Courageous Project
    When some notables of the Bernese town of Langenthal decided to found a porcelain manufactory in July 1906, they were armed with a good dose of courage and staunch enthusiasm. Indeed, after a century without any porcelain manufacture in Switzerland, there were no raw materials and, more particularly, no specialized local workforce available. They had to start completely from scratch in order to rewrite Switzerland into the porcelain history books.

    After a chaotic start, production became more organized and the manufactory began displaying its goods in specialized exhibitions and fairs with encouraging success. The outbreak of the First World War curbed this momentum. In 1937, in order to reduce its dependence on imported coal, the manufactory constructed the first 24-hour electric tunnel kiln. This technological breakthrough allowed the company to increase and diversify its production.
    After the Second World War, the manufactory enjoyed a heyday. The remarkable quality of the Swiss-made products enabled it to fight off the competitors. In 1964, the firm recorded the highest number of employees in its history, with 950 workers.

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  • David Claerbout. the time that remains / Parasol unit, London

    David Claerbout. the time that remains exhibition Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London

    David Claerbout. the time that remains / Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London
    May 30 – August 10, 2012

    Preview: 30 May 2012, 6.30 – 9 pm.

    On 30 May 2012, Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art will preview a solo exhibition dedicated to the filmic works of the Belgian artist David Claerbout. The exhibition features works spanning Claerbout’s practice from 2000 to the present. The time that remains will be the artist’s first solo exhibition in a London public gallery.

    Claerbout situates his striking work between the complex worlds of digital photography and film, investigating this intermediate area in concise and thought-provoking installations. Claerbout’s films often depict everyday activities or events, which once digitally manipulated negate the linear passage of time. His work questions the viewer’s conventional ideas of time and narrative processes.

    Filmed in a house designed by contemporary architect Rem Koolhaas and using the same episode shot at ten-minute intervals from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Bordeaux Piece, 2004, lasts nearly fourteen hours. Three actors repeat flat dialogue and use dramatic gestures. They seem to be the protagonists of the work, but as time goes by the narrative slowly collapses into the movement of the sun and the changing light of day. A different sense of time is created and the protagonist is now the natural world. This work contains Claerbout’s first use of dialogue.

    The Algiers’ Sections of a Happy Moment, 2008, is set on a small soccer pitch on a roof of the Algiers casbah. Young men, surrounded by a group of elderly people, pause in their game as one of the players feeds a flock of eager seagulls. The succession of images in this ‘happy moment’ provides a reflection on what Claerbout terms ‘the suspicious gaze’. The artist uses the passage of time as a tool for moderating that suspicious gaze, and more generally as a means of reconsidering what we see.

    Set within the rigorous architecture of Skywood House, near Denham in the UK, Sunrise, 2009, takes the viewer into near-total darkness. The film depicts a nocturnal scene inside the villa, where a maid goes about her usual routine while the inhabitants sleep. The camera follows her through the course of her work and finally films her as she cycles home along a country road under the rising sun, accompanied by an imposing piece of music by Rachmaninov.

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  • Anat Shiftan: Stilled Life / Vessels Gallery, Boston, USA

    Anat Shiftan: Stilled Life exhibition at Vessels Gallery, Boston

    Anat Shiftan: Stilled Life / Vessels Gallery, Boston, USA
    May 4 – May 27, 2012

    Vessels Gallery is pleased to present Stilled Life, a solo exhibition of the new ceramic work of Anat Shiftan. Born in Israel, and with a degree from Hebrew University in English Literature and Philosophy, Shiftan received her MFA in Ceramics from the Cranbrook Academy of Art and Design. In 2003, the artist joined the faculty at the State University of New York at New Paltz, School of Fine and Performing Arts, where she finds teaching essential to her creative process. She has participated in group exhibitions both nationally and internationally and was featured in the 3rd, 4th and 5th Biennale for Israeli Ceramicsas well as in the 4th Annual Jingdezhen Contemporary International Ceramics Exhibition, in Jingdezhen, China.

    Shiftan is philosophically absorbed by nature and itsre-creation in art. She writes, “Looking at nature is a springboard for my artistic expression…” She is drawn in by the beauty of nature, the fluctuation between its symmetry and imbalance, its order and disarray. More importantly, however, she has become fascinated by the “packaging” of this nature as an art object throughout history. Shiftan is captivated by the human engagement with nature,by man’s desire to artistically capture what has been seen, andfinally by the process of doing it. This conversion from outside to inside, is just as much part of the subject matter as the clay itself.The artist works primarily in porcelain, and her pieces are markedly delicate and alluring, sometimes with sharp edges and coarse surfaces which may invite the viewer to look but not to touch.

    Stilled Life continues Shiftan’s exploration of this dual role: nature in its own setting and nature domesticated. In her own words: “I contemplate the role of nature in artistic history, and I wonder if it is at all accessible to us today as a reality.”

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