Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

Exhibitions

In relief: German Op-Art Ceramics, 1955-75 / University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson

German Relief Porzellan Exhibition, University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson

In relief: German Op-Art Ceramics, 1955-75 / University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson
September 28, 2012 – January 27, 2013

Opening Reception: October 4, 5-7 pm.

A first-ever exhibition of a mid-century movement of German ceramics, known as relief-porzellan, debuts at the University of Arizona Museum of Art. Entitled: In Relief: German Op-Art Ceramics, 1955-75” the exhibition opens on September 28 and runs through January 27, 2013. Both the exhibition and reception are open to the public.

Lawrence Gipe, UA Associate Professor of Studio Art, has been collecting mid-century German ceramics known as relief-porzellan for a number of years. Little was known about these beautiful objects until Gipe undertook to discover the history of their production. This exhibition presents his fascinating research, bringing to light the stories behind the factories and individual artists who created the objects.

"Several years ago, I became aware of this unique genre of German ceramics," says Gipe. "These mass-produced objects were made in "biscuit" porcelain – a matte-white or black finish that leaves the shape unglazed and naked, unadorned in its starkness."

Between the years of 1955-1980, more than a dozen companies were producing the Relief-Porzellan ceramics, mostly vases. Artisans, working in small Bavarian towns, created hundreds of designs, both geometric and organic. Some of the ceramic objects were stamped on the bottoms with the name of the designer and the trademark of the company that produced them. Gipe’s visit to an archive in Selb, Germany, the venerable Rosenthal and Co., offered a trove of journals and files, revealing artists and providing attributions to previously anonymous pieces.

Research for the UAMA exhibition, In Relief: German Op-Art Ceramics, was made possible by a grant from the International Affairs Department at the University of Arizona. The University of Arizona Museum of Art includes more than 6,000 artworks in its permanent collection created by artists from the 14th through the 21st centuries. UAMA is one of only twelve museums in Arizona accredited by the American Association of Museums (AAM) and one of only 750 museums of the 16,000 museums nationwide with this highest award for excellence in the museum field.

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  • Bertozzi & Casoni: Regeneration / All Visual Arts, London

    Bertozzi Casoni Regeneration exhibition, All Visual Arts, London

    Bertozzi & Casoni: Regeneration / All Visual Arts, London
    October 13 - November 10, 2012

    Private view: October 12, 7-9 pm.

    All Visual Arts are proud to present Regeneration, a unique installation from Italian artists Bertozzi & Casoni. The artists are acclaimed for their delicate depictions of a culture in decay, deftly rendered in fragile ceramic clay. Their latest work Regeneration queries the hierarchy of aesthetics, revealing the beauty in the neglected and discarded ephemera of our seamless culture. The pieces compel the viewer to confront the visceral decay of contemporary society, to expose the cracks between the artifice of the world we are presented with and to explore what lies within these fissures. With this imaginative approach to their practice, Bertozzi and Casoni align the traditional with the experimental, and allow us to construct our own narrative around their evocative scenes.

    Bertozzi and Casoni manipulate the indistinction between the real and the simulacrum in their work, an obsession for detail which evokes the Decadent taste for imitation and crafted artifice as superior to the natural. In fabricating these visually and emotionally compelling still-lifes, the artists engage the viewer in deeper themes of impermanence and mortality. Through rendering the abject and overlooked in such exquisite detail, Bertozzi and Casoni signal the return of the repressed, the avoidance of our own mortality. In one piece in which the memento mori is explicitly rendered, an ox skull is dominated by a vivid monitor lizard, symbolic of both death and rebirth in its habitat across Asia and Australia. In the antonymously titled DisGRACE, vibrant blooms sprout from the polluted detritus of a decadent and avaricious society, a scene of nature triumphing over the excesses of hyper-capitalism.

    Regeneration contemplates the possibility of change through rebirth, rediscovery and reappropriation, manipulating earth into elegant and fragile structures. In one piece, a cluster of butterflies flock to raise the severed head of a deer from an ornamental platter, recalling the Renaissance representations of John the Baptist or Holofernes. In a similar echo of classical scenes, and dominating the Regeneration is the serene image of a silverback gorilla resting in the Buddhist lotus position on a bed of discarded mattresses. A roe deer lies prone across its body, while wrens and goldcrests commune around the pair. The piece is an evocation of symbolic power, from the visceral confrontation of our Darwinian descendent dying out in front of our eyes, to the shift between the viewer and sculpture, object and subject as we find ourselves caught in the compassionate gaze of the animals. Our own mortality is inscribed in the tableaux where urban structures, religion and the animal world collide to reveal the grace in disgrace which Bertozzi and Casoni seek to capture.

    It seems appropriate that the duo push their material to its limits and question the possibility of representation in their work at every turn. Their liberal accumulation and compilation of cultural references is evident in the playful amalgamation of objects in a work where a swordfish’s head juts from a guitar case; the shapes tessellating the natural with the cultural. Their curiosity and playful approach to objects creates a process of continual experimentation and discovery, freeing themselves from convention and the stereotypes of the ornamental and domestic associated with the ceramic medium, and producing unexpected moments of pathos and humour through their synthesis of past and present, nature and artifice. The artists subvert the established rules about the perception of applied arts through inverting the symbolic power of their traditional medium, exceeding the inherent conservativism of ceramics to sculpt fantastic and grotesque scenes that liberate both the artist and viewer’s imagination.

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  • Reviving the light: Zsolnay Ceramic Design / ILIAD, New York

    Reviving the light: Zsolnay Contemporary Ceramics, ILIAD, New York
    Zsolnay Contemporary Ceramics, ILIAD, New York - Work by Zsuzsa Fuzesi

    Reviving the light: Zsolnay Ceramic Design / ILIAD, New York
    October 17 - November 30, 2012

    Opening reception: Wednesday, October 17, from 6 - 8 pm

    Works by Eva Zeisel, Julia Kunin, Zsuzsa Füzesi, Viktor Erdei, Sándor Dobány, Edina Andrási.
    Curators: Julia Kunin and Andrea Megyes

    Balassi Institute New York and ILIAD are proud to present the exhibition Reviving the Light: New Zsolnay Eosin Ceramics, featuring contemporary designs by a select group of Hungarian and American artists prepared at the Zsolnay porcelain factory in Pécs, Hungary. The exhibition opens on October 17, 2012 at ILIAD and will be on view until November 30. The Zsolnay Porcelain Manufacturing Company, founded in the 1850’s, has been known to produce the finest in Hungarian ceramics, particularly during its “golden age” in the Art Nouveau and Secession periods at the turn of the 19th and early part of the 20th century. To revive old traditions lost during the Second World War and the Soviet occupation, six artists participated at a workshop held at the Siklós Ceramics Arts Center in southern Hungary in summer 2011. The aim of the workshop was to produce objects that would highlight Zsolnay’s traditional role in producing high-end ceramics and demonstrate the compatibility of techniques like eosin glaze with contemporary art and design. An express goal of the symposium: the presentation of those works in a special showing in New York City.The exhibition testifies to the unique reservoir of traditional techniques safeguarded at Zsolnay while showcasing the innovative potential for contemporary design highlighted by these iridescent and luminous glazes. Of special interest are a series of vases by Eva Zeisel, which she contributed to the Siklós symposium in 2011. These were originally designed for Royal Stafford, and now enriched with iridescent glazes. Re-contextualizing some of her late-career trademark designs, on view will be examples of select forms designed by her in 1983 when she was invited to collaborate with the Zsolnay factory. These designs for eosin-glaze pieces were first executed in 1998 in a limited number.

    Artists include Viktor Erdei, a young designer at the  Zsolnay factory, whose works re-imagine Art Nouveau in their invocations of natural forms. Sándor Dobány is an expert in architectural ceramic design, and creates fantastical porcelain objects painted with surreal imagery. Zsuzsa Füzesi’s Whimsical Vessels series in eosin glaze investigate the geometries of structure and matter, and Edina Andrási’s experimental deconstructions of historical Zsolnay vases create objects that are both evocative of and radically different from their original sources.

    Finally, New York-based artist Julia Kunin’s recent pieces explore concepts of excess, growth, and decay, often bringing to mind memento mori. The works incorporate iridescent glazes, which change constantly with the light, creating psychedelic surfaces on the baroque forms. Apart from her contribution as artist, Kunin both proposed the show to New York City partners and co-curated the exhibition.

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  • Liliana Folta exhibition / Amazing Things Art Center, Framingham, MA

    Liliana Folta exhibition, Amazing Things Art Center, Framingham

    Liliana Folta exhibition / Amazing Things Art Center, Framingham, MA
    September 27 - October 28, 2012

    Opening reception and Artist talk: October 4, 7-9 pm.

    Liliana Folta is a Latin American multidisciplinary artist. Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, she lives and works in Boston, Massachusetts.

    "The potential ability of the imagination has an important impact in our lives. Minds have visual images that we collect through our lives.

    These inner-images that represent my works are examinations of my existence. However, in this bank of memories I cherish every possible emotion; happiness, growing pains, family loss, first love, motherhood, sexuality, multicultural experiences, frustration, society’s rules and most importantly the celebration of life.

    As an artist I like to work with different mediums especially acrylic paintings and ceramic sculptures. For the past few years I have been experimenting with mixed media installation. The freedom of expanding my work in another dimension makes me feel more connected with the viewers.

    The process of my work mostly is very spontaneous; the rest comes along with what my subconscious has been saving in my bank of memories, throughout my life and the happening of the moment.”

    Exhibition in collaboration with Mike Vickers (Light effects) and Gustavo Jiménez (Experimental sounds).
    Curator: Olga Shmuylovich.

    Liliana Fonta’s works are in several private and public collections in the United States, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Australia, Spain, Poland, Museum of Contemporary Ceramics - Dominican Republic, Ku Art Center - Beijing.

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  • Aneta Regel Deleu exhibition / Puls Contemporary Ceramics, Brussels

    Aneta Regel Deleu exhibition Puls Contemporary Ceramics Gallery Brussels

    Aneta Regel Deleu exhibition / Puls Contemporary Ceramics, Brussels
    September 8 - October 6, 2012

    Prize winning Polish-born artist Aneta Regel Deleu is a rapidly rising star on the European ceramic art horizon. She is an honors graduate of the Gdansk, Poland Fine Art Academy and London’s University of Westminster and Royal College of Art. This is her first exhibition at Puls Contemporary Ceramics Gallery.

    "The main focus of my ceramic forms is the exploration of materials and their combinations. I am particularly interested combining the rough natural qualities of materials such as rock with malleable materials such as clay. The resulting juxtaposition of the natural and human-made creates a dramatic friction and tension. This reinforces the transformation and sense of movement that objects undergo during the passage from one state to another throughout the making process."

    Aneta Regel’s work seeks no functional path other than that of the communicative and expository power of art itself. Like certain of her mid-20th century pioneering artistic antecedents, she utterly rejects the label of potter. Simply because her medium is clay, fire and occasionally glaze, that does not make it craft. The designation of ceramist or ceramic artist—or better yet, ceramic sculptor—is both more expansive and accurate.

    The human figure is not her vehicle of expression. Rather it is the trees, rocks, fields, and river-beds first encountered in her native northern Poland and later in her travels. Her formal language is abstract, creating a sort of equivalent to the natural world rather than attempting to describe it. Hers is a landscape, or more precisely, aspects of a landscape that create images through which she seeks to convey her vision of a reality we may already have encountered or indeed might yet encounter.

    Regel is a romantic seeking to capture the forms, energies and rhythms of the forests and natural phenomena that have surrounded her. She has repeatedly been confronted by native rock, split and ground into powder by the power of glacial ice.

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  • MOUNTED / Red Lodge Clay Center, Red Lodge, MT

    MOUNTED exhibition Red Lodge Clay Center, Montana, Roxanne Jackson Ceramics

    MOUNTED / Red Lodge Clay Center, Red Lodge, MT
    October 5-28, 2012

    Opening Reception: Friday, October 5, from 5-7 pm.

    This October, Red Lodge Clay Center will present MOUNTED. An exhibit featuring the works of Lindsay Pichaske, Adelaide Paul, Ryan Blackwell, Thaddeus Erdahl, Amy Santoferraro, Christine Golden, Undine Brod and Roxanne Jackson. Topical to many regions is the ritual of hunting season and the provision of food. Just beyond the border of a ritual born of need are taxidermy arts, which can serve as an analogy for Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. The aforementioned survivalist skill sets are about harnessing natural elements. Decorative or trophy mounting came after our basic needs as humans were met. The work featured in this exhibit will, hopefully, explore the realm beyond basic needs and delve into hazards of modernity with frivolous, dark, and poignant mounts.

    The exhibition will be posted online, Monday, October 7 by 10 am at the Red Lodge Clay Center’s website.

    Gallery Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10 am - 6 pm. Sunday,  12 - 4 pm.

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  • CONCEPTION - Part Two / Canvas Galleries, Belfast

    CONCEPTION - Part Two at Canvas Galleries, Belfast with Patrick Colhoun and Darren MacPherson

    CONCEPTION - Part Two / Canvas Galleries, Belfast
    September 27 - October 11, 2012

    Opening Reception: Thursday, September 27, 6.30 - 9.00 pm.

    Following on from Conception Part One London in June, Darren MacPherson and Patrick Colhoun introduce the second part of a two part exhibition of work from two very different but complimentary artists. Two mediums, MacPherson’s vibrant, acid coloured figurative paintings alongside Colhoun’s dark, brooding, somewhat disturbing contemporary sculpture.

    Part one in June was London, MacPherson’s base; part two is Belfast, Colhoun’s hometown.

    Part one, described as ‘Art with balls’ by Cool on Demand Culture blog, showcased the work in a gritty industrial setting in South East London. The second venue will be a contemporary white cube gallery in Belfast, a city really starting to find its feet in the genre of contemporary art.

    Two artists, two cities, two cultures, two mediums.

    Darren MacPherson has a growing reputation as a contemporary figurative artist whose acrylic and spray paint works are bold and full of colour.

    His frequent use of high key colours can be jarring, even startling to a first-time viewer. The negative space in the composition used merely to emphasise the foreground; this is the part of his work that he spends most time on, adding layer upon layer of content. Darren’s colours bounce off the canvas and his chaotic, sometimes erratic, strokes make for abstract suggestions of the male and female form.

    Inclusion in prestigious events such as FLAGSTOP in Los Angeles, the inaugural Other Art Fair in London and the 2011 National Open Art Exhibition are cementing MacPherson as an artist with a growing reputation.

    Patrick Colhoun is a contemporary sculptor living and working in Belfast. His irreverent approach and ever darker subject matter make for work that is anything but traditional ceramics. His use of other materials such as latex, hosiery and piercings add to the mix.

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  • ScanCeram 2012 - Scandinavian Ceramics Conference / Hjørring, Denmark

    ScanCeram, Scandinavian Contemporary Ceramics Conference 2012, Hjørring, Denmark

    ScanCeram: Scandinavian Ceramics Conference 2012 / Hjørring, Denmark
    September 20-23, 2012

    Join the annual Scandinavian Ceramics Conference in Hjørring, Denmark, for panels, lectures, exhibitions and demonstrations by outstanding ceramic artists and professionals from Scandinavia and around the world. Registration is available online.

    Presenters: Karin Andersson, Stefan Andersson, Polly Beach, Clive Bowen, Nato Eristavi, Ann-Louise Gustafsson, Susanne Hangaard, Hbyba Harrabi, Janne Hieck, Ayumi Horie, Ane Fabricius, Anna Johansdottir, Henning Jørgensen, James Kasper, Michael Maguire, Susan Maguire, Gregory Hamilton Miller, Sheri O’Connor, Steve Mattison, Catherine Orrantia, Anders Ruhwald, Markus Rusch, Bernt Petersen, Waleed Qaisi.

    THEMES
    ▬ Ceramic Artist Residencies: Centers and Programs
    What kind of opportunities are there for ceramic artists to work in new contexts around the world? How do we find these programs, and what can we access there? How do these ceramic work centers and institutions develop, how are they funded, and who do they provide resources for? How do artists apply for a residency, and what kind of projects get accepted? How can an artist residency fit with your career, whether you’re a student, young professlonal, or world renowned artist.
    Mette Blum Marcher (DK), Steve Mattington (Hungary/Wales)

    ▬ Earthenware and slip
    Earthenware clay is one of the most common minerals on earth, and can be found in almost every country in the world. In combination with other clay slip materials, and metal oxides, it makes up one of the most common material ranges of the ceramic pallet. During the conference, we’ll have presentations about English Slip Ware, Slip trailing in England and Japan, and different slip applications to Earthenware ranges. In addition, we’ll be discussing new developments in low temperature glazes that do and don’t contain lead, borate, and other low temperature fluxes, exploring the fit and fitness of these various glaze options.
    Clive Bowen (UK), Waleed Qaisi (Iraq/Qatar)

    ▬ Trends in Scandinavian Ceramics
    What’s happening now in Scandinavian Ceramics? Who are the emerging and expanding voices in the ceramic field, and what are they working on, and burning for? Where did they study, and how did they get moving in our field? Are you one of them? Would you like a place to tell about your work at ScanCeram? We’ve made one for you! If you’re a student or faculty in Ceramics, we’ve got special opportunities this year for you to present about your work, your school, or your institution. Together with the Vendsyssel Art Museum, we’ve also arranged our first museum level exhibition of NY NORDIC KERAMIK September 11th to October 21st, 2012, with an opening reception and gallery talks Friday, September 21st by involved artists, curators, and organizers.
    Ane-Fabricius Christiansen (DK), Ann-Louise Gustafsson (SE), Susanne Hangaard (DK)

    ▬ Ceramic Institutions: Education
    What kind of ceramic education institutions exist in the world today? In Germany, the Ceramic School in Landshut offers programs in apprenticeship, journeymen, and masters level ceramics, while still being engaged with studio art practices, an extension of a guild system. How does this compare with ceramic educations in the USA, which focus on Bachelor and MFA programs, or Australian ones, or those in for example, Georgia? Which of these educations are relevant for what career paths? What skills do they develop, what communities do they participate in and develop? How do these institutions collaborate with each other more broadly nationally and internationally?
    Michael Maquire (USA), Nato Eristavi (Georgia), Sheri O’Connor (USA)

    ▬ Internet and Online Marketing
    Should you be selling your work on Etsy? Do you have a commercial Facebook Site? Who do you follow on Twitter? And how do you get these activities to result in actual sales of your work? These, and many other important techniques for marketing your work and yourself online, are an important focus of this years conference. With experienced professionals presenting and leading the discussion, we’ll work up guidelines and suggestions for current activities, and try to anticipate future directions to move in. Beyond that, what are the minimal basic activities that we need to invest in to have a presence online, that is time and economically efficient.
    Ayumi Horie (USA), Stefan Andersson (SE), Polly Beach (USA)

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  • Clémence van Lunen exhibition / Galerie NeC, Hong Kong

    Clémence van Lunen contemporary ceramics exhibition Galerie NeC, Hong Kong - Ceramics Now Magazine

    Clémence van Lunen exhibition / Galerie NeC, Hong Kong
    October 5 - November 18, 2012

    Opening: Thursday, October 4, from 6 pm.

    "Sculpture, polyglot, curious and on the alert, fascinated by the countries which she has discovered, cultures and languages which she practises and likes, Clémence Van Lunen is a renaissance woman. She develops multiple works which could be defined as high curiosity in the same sense we sometimes describe ancient amateurs cabinet, but in her case it is in an eclectic and knowledgable way. The art critic and exhibition curator Frédéric Bodet wrote about her work, "rare forms are expressed with an indecisive act, dedicated to the enjoyment as much as to the dismay that she constantly tries to disturb us, her sculptures evoke a sort of sympathy which makes you stop and hesitate."
    Her invitation to Sèvres in 2007 - that allowed me to get to know her better - stood out as an evidence, as a necessary stage for her after her travels a round the world and her research in ceramics.

    On her return from one of her regular travels to China, she proposed at Cité de la céramique a universe of porcelain dragons (she chose on purpose the most symbolic animal of China), with the determination to produce them all herself with an never before used experimental mixture of porcelain pastas from our mill.

    Compositions of a series of porcelain elements turned, deformed then wrapped up, gathered in an experimental way and delicately assembled, the monumental sculptures required the traditional techniques of production but, however, adapted in a personal and creative way. She then imagined an centre piece , consisting of several elements of biscuit which was built up of a small «archipelago» on a table, like so many islands with strange plants; it was an invitation to a new journey!

    Her experience at la Cité de la céramique illustrates perfectly its capacity to create a gateway, to imagine formal round trips, cultural and aesthetic juxtapositions, which are her trademark and her talent.”

    David Caméo, Director of Sèvres, Cité de la Ceramique France

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  • Arina Ailincai: IN-SCRIPTED BODY / Art on the Avenue Gallery, Philadelphia

    Arina Ailincai IN-SCRIPTED BODY exhibition Art on the Avenue Gallery, Philadelphia - Contemporary romanian ceramics

    Arina Ailincăi: IN-SCRIPTED BODY / Art on the Avenue Gallery, Philadelphia, PA
    September 14 - October 7, 2012

    Opening Reception: Friday, September 14, 5:30 - 8:30 pm.

    Art on the Avenue Gallery, at 3808 Lancaster Avenue, is pleased to present Arina Ailincăi: IN-SCRIPTED BODY, a solo sculpture exhibition featuring recent works in clay of this noteworthy international artist.

    Arina Ailincăi is a truly international artist. Raised and educated in Romania, she began her artistic career in Eastern Europe. In the 1980s she crossed the Atlantic and settled in Canada, where she was soon acknowledged as one of its most talented artists working in clay. At that time she also exhibited and lectured in the United States. Over the last several years, she has been invited to work, exhibit and lecture at major ceramic art centers and international events throughout Europe, including Denmark, Estonia, Latvia, France, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, Hungary, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. Most recently she has held residencies in China, Taiwan, Japan and South Korea.

    Arina Ailincăi’s art focuses on the human figure, with the body cast using real bodies - often her own. The closeresemblance of the ceramic sculpture to the actual body is only a starting point for her deeper exploration of the universal human condition as an embodied self. Ailincai’s sculptures in clay are philosophically and metaphorically charged. The markings on the outer surface and the mysterious inscriptions in the hollow interior of the body transform the replica of a particular individual into an archetypal human vessel, holding the traces of inner life, time, place and history.

    "My desire is to “write” a three dimensional poem to both the fragile physical body and the intangible world of our inner existence. I translate this desire into ceramic sculpture through the use of faithfully replicated, life-size clay body-casts and fragments. I press the clay into the plaster mold to create ”the shell," a hollowed out body shape: an empty vessel containing the inner self, with its personal and universal history. The scripts imprinted on the interior walls of the shell, acquire symbolic and metaphoric dimensions, becoming a palimpsest of the entire human existence.  While most of my works are made in clay, I make use of other materials and techniques, often combining drawing and photography in my installations. I want to synthesize two-dimensional and three-dimensional vocabularies into a visual language charged with meaning, which directs the viewers to sense their location, both within and without.” Arina Ailincăi

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  • Contemporary Clay Invitational / j fergeson gallery, Farmville, VA

    Contemporaryc eramics exhibition - Contemporary Clay Invitational exhibition j fergeson gallery, Farmville

    Contemporary Clay Invitational / j fergeson gallery, Farmville, VA
    October 5 - December 15, 2012

    Opening Reception: Saturday, October 13, 5:00 pm.

    The latest show at the j fergeson gallery in Farmville, VA, explores the diverse possibilities of what can be done with clay. This show, the gallery’s largest of the year, features works from 30 national artists. Here one will find both sculptural and functional pieces, but perhaps most interesting is the way the artists have settled somewhere in between.

    The show is an extraordinary collection of ceramic work by artists working at the top of their field. Co-curators Andréa Keys Connell, lead professor in clay at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Adam Paulek, lead professor in clay at Longwood University, chose the artists for their commitment to fine craft, progressive thought, sensitivity to material and humor.

    Artist A. Blair Clemo, inspired by the ornate history of European Decorative Arts, creates vessels that are functional, but also ridiculously opulent, as if ready to serve royalty. John Oliver Lewis presents two sculptures inspired equally by architecture, natural land formations, cartoons, and candy - think Monument Valley out of salt water taffy. And then there’s Darrin Ekern’s “potasaurus”: a sculpture of a T-Rex in a studio throwing a pot.

    Featured artists:
    A. Blair Clemo, Kurt Anderson, Tom Bartel, Jason Hackett, Hiroe Hanazono, Mike Jabbur, Bethany Krull, John Oliver Lewis, Richard Nickel, Nathan Prouty, Debbie Quick, Dave Smith, Mikey Walsh, Trent Berning, Kelly Berning, Jeff Campana, Sam Chung, David Eichelberger, Darrin Ekern, Misty Gamble, Meredith Host Kowalski, Nicole Aquillano, Frank Martin, Dan Molyneux, Chris Picket, Adrian Sandstrom, Amy Santafararo, Shawn Spangler, Kendra Sparks, Adero Willard.

    This variety of work isn’t often seen in small galleries, and the curators are excited to present it to an audience that may be unfamiliar with just how adventurous contemporary clay has become.

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  • Ruth Duckworth exhibition / Erskine Hall & Coe, London

    Ruth Duckworth exhibition Erskine Hall & Coe Gallery, London

    Ruth Duckworth exhibition / Erskine Hall & Coe, London
    September 5 - October 4, 2012

    Erskine, Hall & Coe are pleased to announce the exhibition of the celebrated contemporary sculptor, Ruth Duckworth.

    The exhibition includes 22 artworks in bronze, porcelain and stoneware. The earliest dates from 1965 but the majority of pieces are from the period of late 1980s through to work completed in the final year of Duckworth’s life. The gallery has been working closely with Thea Burger, who represents the Duckworth Estate.

    Writing in her essay to accompany the exhibition Thea Burger states:
    “Duckworth was a modernist sculptor who loved form. She was not about colour, but was about the subtle shape of her pieces. Her forms are typically created in porcelain, stoneware, or bronze. Much admired, she has art works in most of the world’s most prestigious museums, including the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Los Angeles Country Museum, the Victoria and Albert, the Stedelijk Museum, and the Tokyo Museum of Art.”

    In Ruth Duckworth, Modernist Sculptor written by Jo Lauria and Tony Birks, Duckworth talks of her process of creating a sculpture: Ruth Duckworth Porcelain.

    “Play is the essence of creativity. Creative play and gut reaction, instinct. When I work on a piece, I play. I have a whole huge section of the studio where I have an inventory of sculptural forms, simple, abstract, non-specific shapes that I find beautiful and enjoy making. Then I start building these shapes together. And when I find myself smiling, I say “hello!” I think I’ve got something. The process is intuitive, not intellectual. You have to learn to be spontaneous and trust yourself.”

    Download the catalogue of the exhibition or view the catalogue online.

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