Marie Torbensdatter Hermann exhibition / Galerie Nec, Paris

Marie Torbensdatter Hermann exhibition Galerie Nec, Paris

Marie Torbensdatter Hermann exhibition / Galerie Nec, Paris
October 26 - November 24, 2012

"The work reflects on some kind of strange family of domestic objects, they are bound together by a form of action, something undefinable but with a hint of a purpose. As if they are there for one very specific reason, each with a small specific individual function, but on their own they are un-significant, it is as a group how they become useful and self-sufficient. It is in the choice of grouping certain objects with each other and in the spacing of them, that they come into existence. I also see a big part of my practice as an arranger. Someone arranges objects and creates small details, small shots taken from a lager scenario. As if we have the time line in constant flux, I make the decision on where to cut out one image and create that as a memory of what ones was, before it moved on to become something else." Marie T. Hermann

“Looking around Marie T. Hermann’s most recent exhibition of work, we may well have a similar feeling: that we are in the presence of pots that don’t quite need us. They are just fine on their own, thank you. Poised atop their handmade clay shelves, microcosms like the implacably calm still life paintings of Morandi, or set out in a neat ring on the gallery floor, these ceramic sculptures have a quiet assurance, an ease that belies the difficulty of their own making.

You almost have to remind yourself that it’s by no means easy to create this sense of completeness. The usual way of doing it is to make objects that are resolutely alien to everyday experience: the abstract geometries of De Stijl, the weird and hermetic object-poems of the Surrealists, the industrial quality of Minimalist sculpture, or the unearthly light and space created by artist James Turrell. While Hermann’s work is influenced by all of these art historical references, she appeals to something more humble and humane than any of them. As is true of most potters, even those working in the manner of installation artists, daily use is constantly at issue for her – either as a haunting presence or a conspicuous absence. The inclusion of two plates, one sunk into its shelf and the other just emerging, gratifies our expectations on this score, even as the closing off of vases at the mouth refuses it.

While her commitment to achieving a unified aesthetic impression is total, it seems to me that her greatest interest as an artist comes at the level of the detail. Yes, she knows she must (according to some modernist logic) ‘earn’ the right to create an interesting shape, like a sharp break in the profile of a vase, or a gentle curve in the rim of a plate. For her, these subtle touches have to make sense within an overriding context.

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Overthrown: Works by Marie T. Hermann
- You are my weather #A, #B, 2011. Stoneware fired in oxidation. Courtesy of Matin Gallery, Culver City. - Liminal #1, #2, 2011. Stoneware and thread. Courtesy of Matin Gallery, Culver City.- Liminal # 3, 2011. Stoneware fired in oxidation. Courtesy of Matin Gallery, Culver City.(photo by Jeff Wells)

Overthrown: Works by Marie T. Hermann

- You are my weather #A, #B, 2011. Stoneware fired in oxidation. Courtesy of Matin Gallery, Culver City.
- Liminal #1, #2, 2011. Stoneware and thread. Courtesy of Matin Gallery, Culver City.
- Liminal # 3, 2011. Stoneware fired in oxidation. Courtesy of Matin Gallery, Culver City.
(photo by Jeff Wells)