Christine Golden: When We Are Kids, 2012-2013

This series focuses on specific issues we learn about when we are children, and how we react to these same issues as we age based on the way we were taught. Some of the issues I have explored within this series are gender roles, sexuality, and women’s rights.

Children are like sponges and what we learn or are exposed to will effect our ideas as adults, sometimes in rejection of but usually in adherence to the ideals we were taught. The children I sculpt are often pensive or somber and confront the viewer with their gaze. Their expressions are captured in a psychological portrait that solemnly expresses the enormity of their journey ahead.

Christine Golden: You, Me, This and That, 2011-2014

This series encompasses several different types of relationships and varies from piece to piece. Some of the sculptures in this series focus on the relationship between people and the environment. For example, our general disconnect with nature, excessive consumption, and the earths’ retaliation. Other sculptures focus on the relationships we can form with objects or an accumulation of material goods. This can, but does not always relate back to our connection to the environment.

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Beverly Mayeri / Duane Reed Gallery, Saint Louis

Beverly Mayeri at Duane Reed Gallery, Saint Louis

Beverly Mayeri / Duane Reed Gallery, Saint Louis
April 11 - May 10, 2014

Beverly Mayeri is a studio artist living in the Bay Area with over 30 years experience as an established ceramic sculptor. She earned a BA from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MA in sculpture at San Francisco State University.

Mayeri works with refined and elegant heads and figures often using meticulously patterned details that allude to the inner life of emotions, thoughts and human frailties. The pieces are painted in washes of acrylic paint. Mayeri’s figures “evoke a richly complicated human presence,”and often “bridge the psychological, the political and the sensuous within one hybrid form.”

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Cindy Billingsley: On the prowl cheetahs, 2009, 15” x 22” x 22”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: On the prowl cheetahs, 2009, 15” x 22” x 22”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Koala, 2007, 25” x 27”x 15”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Cindy Billingsley: Koala, 2007, 25” x 27”x 15”, raku clay, hand built solid, hollowed for firing, low fired, cold finish acrylic and wax

Susan Meyer: Together, 2008, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, wood, video and sound, dimensions variable

Susan Meyer: Together, 2008, Laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, wood, video and sound, dimensions variable

Chris Riccardo

Chris Riccardo's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

Chris Riccardo received his BFA in sculpture from the College of Fine Arts at Boston University.

In 1995, Chris opened his own commercial bronze casting foundry, RDK Studios in West Palm Beach, FL. A few years later, he began teaching figurative sculpture at the Armory Art Center. Shortly after he decided to sell his foundry and concentrate on his work and teaching. In 2007, Chris was named the Director of the Sculpture Department and Foundry Manager. He set up a small foundry at the Armory and began teaching the fine art of bronze casting.

For a number of year his work dealt with the figure in bronze.  Recently, he has started to work less in bronze and more in clay. His figures are one of a kind, fired clay with underglazes. For years his color palette was that of the limited bronze patina finishes. Working in clay has opened up new doors to his work with the unlimited color palette available with glazes.
He is currently represented by the Mindy Solomon gallery in St. Petersburg, FL.

“They point and laugh, tease and ridicule all the while unaware of the consequences.
As important as play is to our development as adults, what effect does play have on those who cannot participate in the traditional sense of the word?
Consequences comments on the epidemic of childhood obesity in our country and how the disease affects our children’s ability to play, leading to low-self esteem, inability to interact and work with others and possible future psychological abnormalities.
It is these abnormalities that have been the focus of my recent work, starting with my series entitled: Mugz: American Heroes. The pieces in Mugz are taken from police blotter mug shots and the accused crimes are woven into their portraits. Consequences takes this idea one step further and explores the idea of how these people end up in front of the authority’s camera.” Chris Riccardo

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